Reputation
Next tag badge:
318/400 score
68/80 answers
Badges
18 160 371
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~2.7m people reached

Apr
13
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
That's only true for programs that don't take appreciable time. There are lots of programs that take appreciable time and they're not all edge cases. Even in the 300ms case Jeff uses in that example, that 300ms (which is a ~30% worse time) is 30% fewer servers you need to buy for your web tier, or 30% more users you can handle before you need to upgrade. Jeff's article is just saying that you need to consider readability in addition to performance when making these decisions. Keep in mind, the same blog also has this post: blog.codinghorror.com/everything-is-fast-for-small-n
Apr
13
comment What is causing NotSupportedException (“The given path's format is not supported”) while using a valid path?
@LibinTK I pasted your example into Visual Studio, saved it as a text file, and opened it up in a text editor. There's a U+202A LEFT-TO-RIGHT EMBEDDING character in between the " and the G.
Apr
13
comment Is this movl instruction necessary?
That is, gets may look like *(arg++) = readChar() or similar, right?
Apr
13
answered How can two process share a single dll in .net?
Apr
10
comment how to find the “true” entropy of std::random_device?
@Raphael A cryptographically secure PRNG is still cryptographically secure. But it's not nondeterministic. As I mentioned, it eventually ends up in RtlGenRandom.
Apr
10
awarded  Revival
Apr
10
revised how to find the “true” entropy of std::random_device?
added 435 characters in body
Apr
10
comment how to find the “true” entropy of std::random_device?
@vsoftco: Yeah, if you don't trust the platform, you can't rely on it. It's up to the implementer to provide the random source. Even hardware answers like rdrand leave you trusting the hardware to be actually random.
Apr
10
comment how to find the “true” entropy of std::random_device?
@vsoftco: Then random_device, which is specified as an implementation defined source of randomness, is not for you :)
Apr
10
revised how to find the “true” entropy of std::random_device?
added 417 characters in body
Apr
10
answered how to find the “true” entropy of std::random_device?
Apr
9
comment Why exception must be declared?
Note that noexcept also means that if the function actually does let an exception escape, go directly to terminate, go directly to terminate, do not pass Go, do not collect $200.
Apr
9
awarded  Populist
Apr
9
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
If your program is I/O bound, sure. But there are a hell of a lot of non-IO bound programs in the world. When I started on the app I'm currently working on it took 10 minutes to process a 960MB input. Now it takes 2 minutes. And none of that improvement was from algorithmic changes.
Apr
8
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
@Yuval: For the same reason I don't build every program ever twice to see if SortedDictionary is faster than Dictionary in the mutable case; I'm looking for the "reasonable default to reach for in most cases".
Apr
8
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
@Yuval: It's not an implementation detail any more than Dictionary being a hash table is an implementation detail. The value would be that the sorted-by-T version may be faster in typical use cases than the sorted-by-GetHashCode version in the same way Dictionary is typically faster than SortedDictionary.
Apr
8
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
@Yuval: Because ImmutableDictionary is sorted. It's just sorted by the numeric value of GetHashCode rather than by an intrinsic sort provided by the key type.
Apr
8
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
I have never worked on a program where the program took any reasonable amount of time where changing core data structures didn't have significant performance impacts.
Apr
8
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
@YuvalItzchakov: ImmutableDictionary and ImmutableSortedDictionary (which are both AVL trees)
Apr
8
comment Should one prefer ImmutableDictionary, or ImmutableSortedDictionary?
1. Well, I'm more interested in practical behavior; ImmutableArray is much faster to iterate than ImmutableList, for example; but has the same complexity. 2. Of course ImmutableDictionary falls back to linear behavior in the event GetHashCode values are the same...