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I'm a Microsoft Software Development Engineer on the Trustworthy Computing Team. I've worked at several security related places previously, including Malware Bytes and PreEmptive Solutions.

On StackOverflow I mostly answer related questions, though I occasionally forray into and a couple of others.

I am the author of pevFind, a component of the ComboFix malware removal tool, and volunteer at BleepingComputer.com as a malware response instructor. My Twitter account is @MalwareMinigun.


Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: Yes. Even if you use the same compiler on the same platform with settings, the actual numbers could be different.
Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: Your question was not "how do I declare something as aligned in C?" it was "Can I create a C++ object in C on the stack?" The answer to the first one was standardized in C99. The answer to the second is "you can't". I assumed that _Alignas was not an acceptable answer because you specifically said you wanted the compiler to calculate the alignment for you, which _Alignas does not do.
Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: The values in ?s are compiler / platform / compiler settings specific. Which was what I said in the first place.
Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: C++ allows an implementation to reorder members in your class in any way it so chooses. There's no portable way to mimic the structure of a C++ class in C. As I said, many vendors document their object layout schemes and for a single compiler on a single platform you may be able to get something that works, but the standards in question make no such cross platform guarantees.
Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: No. That would require being able to declare the C++ class in C which is not possible to do in a portable way. (Many C and C++ compiler vendors document their class layouts which you could attempt to mimic, but the standard calls such things undefined behavior)
Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: If your question is "can C create C++ objects" the answer is no. You could declare a POD type with the same layout as a C++ class and have the C code give you one of those; but that's functionally equivalent to the create_foo and destroy_foo bits I already posted.
Nov
7
comment Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
@user: Where would you put the wrapper object on the stack? When you return anything placed on the stack by any function is destroyed. That behavior is far older than C++.
Nov
7
answered Use C++ class in C without dynamic allocation?
Nov
7
comment How do I remove a function from overload resolution?
Nope. You can make it an error to call something (by deleteing it) but you can't remove something altogether.
Nov
7
comment c++ Memory reduction with arrays
1. Why is memory use an issue here? 2. A pointer is typically 4 bytes (on 32 bit platforms) or 8 bytes (on 64 bit platforms). Adding pointers will make your memory use worse, not better. Why not just allocate one big block and get rid of the pointers?
Nov
5
revised What are all the ways use_count of std::shared_ptr is incremented?
added 108 characters in body
Nov
5
comment What are all the ways use_count of std::shared_ptr is incremented?
@codeBricks: The only ways that don't trigger undefined behavior, yeah. (There are a bunch of member functions hanging off shared_ptr that may change this; I'm not completely positive for everything; but any other members behave like copy construction or copy assignment in some way)
Nov
5
answered What are all the ways use_count of std::shared_ptr is incremented?
Nov
5
comment Increasing the stack size: typical issues?
There's nothing that makes the stack "faster" from a memory access prospective; it's just cheap to allocate and deallocate because allocate is "increment pointer" and deallocate is "decrement pointer". For things you allocate once and reuse across frames it gains you nothing to do that.
Nov
4
comment 64bit Applications and Inline Assembly
@AcidShout: Good thing MSFT makes all that money from that compiler they give away for free :)
Nov
4
comment 64bit Applications and Inline Assembly
@Acid: Complain to the people who own the compiler, not me. Although I happen to agree with the compiler folks here. If you want to use assembly, then just write an assembly file. I'm happy that they're not spending development time implementing a frontend feature that 99.999% of people should not be using when a perfectly fine workaround exists.
Nov
4
comment Can't read text file yet passing is_open and good checks?
Access violations aren't anything to do with files that are open or not. Most likely the bug lies somewhere else.
Oct
31
comment Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
@NikolaDimitroff: Ah, I bet that's the answer the interviewer was looking for :)
Oct
31
revised Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
added 161 characters in body
Oct
31
comment Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
No, thank you :) Downvote removed.