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location Redmond, WA
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I'm a Microsoft Software Development Engineer on the Trustworthy Computing Team. I've worked at several security related places previously, including Malware Bytes and PreEmptive Solutions.

On StackOverflow I mostly answer related questions, though I occasionally forray into and a couple of others.

I am the author of pevFind, a component of the ComboFix malware removal tool, and volunteer at BleepingComputer.com as a malware response instructor. My Twitter account is @MalwareMinigun.


Nov
5
answered What are all the ways use_count of std::shared_ptr is incremented?
Nov
5
comment Increasing the stack size: typical issues?
There's nothing that makes the stack "faster" from a memory access prospective; it's just cheap to allocate and deallocate because allocate is "increment pointer" and deallocate is "decrement pointer". For things you allocate once and reuse across frames it gains you nothing to do that.
Nov
4
comment 64bit Applications and Inline Assembly
@AcidShout: Good thing MSFT makes all that money from that compiler they give away for free :)
Nov
4
comment 64bit Applications and Inline Assembly
@Acid: Complain to the people who own the compiler, not me. Although I happen to agree with the compiler folks here. If you want to use assembly, then just write an assembly file. I'm happy that they're not spending development time implementing a frontend feature that 99.999% of people should not be using when a perfectly fine workaround exists.
Nov
4
comment Can't read text file yet passing is_open and good checks?
Access violations aren't anything to do with files that are open or not. Most likely the bug lies somewhere else.
Oct
31
comment Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
@NikolaDimitroff: Ah, I bet that's the answer the interviewer was looking for :)
Oct
31
revised Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
added 161 characters in body
Oct
31
comment Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
No, thank you :) Downvote removed.
Oct
31
answered Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
Oct
31
comment Which is more efficient in this scenario: std::vector<bool> or std::unordered_map<int>?
The unordered_Xxx containers are average case O(1) and worst case O(n), never O(lg n).
Oct
31
comment Why am I getting 'vector subscript out of range'?
(Also, why the Disposeable concept? That's what destructors are for!)
Oct
31
comment Why am I getting 'vector subscript out of range'?
vector subscript out of range means "you asked for an element from the vector, but the vector is not of that size". e.g. vector<int> vec; vec.push_back(42); vec[1] // oops, 42 is vec[0]
Oct
31
revised Converting list of strings into C style array
added 56 characters in body
Oct
31
comment Converting list of strings into C style array
@Lightness: Ah, I see. I didn't see the "C style byte array". It does put the data into a C style array (which is what the question title asked for).
Oct
31
comment Converting list of strings into C style array
@Lightness: (Also, the point is not to give the OP drop-in code; the point is to describe how one would do this.)
Oct
31
comment Converting list of strings into C style array
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Yes, it is; it just does the allocation and deletion of it for you. If you need a pointer to the underlying buffer you can call data().
Oct
31
revised Converting list of strings into C style array
added 317 characters in body
Oct
31
answered Converting list of strings into C style array
Oct
30
comment RVO Operators With Multiple Returns
The rule for RVO / NRVO is: if all return paths are r-values or if all return paths are the same local variable, (N)RVO is viable.
Oct
30
comment Difference between {0} and calloc?
@Jim: No, it did not.