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Feb
9
comment I don't clearly see why this is the Fibonacci sequence. Am I intelligent enough to be a Haskell programmer?
I had to look up scanl and see that scanl f x (y : ys) = x : scanl (f x y) ys. That definition is the key, and I certainly didn't remember it. But then I could see that fibs = 1 : scanl (+) 1 fibs gives me fibs = 1 : gibs where gibs = scanl (+) 1 (1 : gibs) = 1 : scanl (+) 2 gibs. Which means gibs = 1 : hibs where hibs = scanl (+) 2 (1 : hibs) = 2 : scanl (+) 3 hibs. Before each step, we have two consecutive Fibonacci numbers: one before scanl, one waiting in the scanl. Each step slides the window: the "waiting" element emerges and is replaced in the scanl by the sum of the pair.
Feb
7
comment Haskell: automatic creation of constuctor-checker / selector functions
This is your statutory warning that, as ADT stands both for "Algebraic Data Type" and "Abstract Data Type", it is an acronym well worth avoiding. Meanwhile, checkers and selectors are symptomatic of treating the former as if they are the latter.
Jan
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
2
comment How to use Data Kinds + Phantom types to encode units in Haskell?
No. But it's not tricky. Generative definitions make new things. Non-generative definitions make new names for old things.
Jan
2
comment How to use Data Kinds + Phantom types to encode units in Haskell?
Remember that type is not generative. Length Meter = Double = Length Km. You have not introduced any unit-based distinctions here at all, I'm afraid. You may do better with newtype or data.
Dec
23
answered Create sort of splitfunction haskell
Dec
23
answered Rotate a matrix in Haskell
Dec
18
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
18
comment Why do we need containers?
@SjoerdVisscher aye, terminal mistake
Dec
18
revised Why do we need containers?
fixed thinko
Dec
18
comment Why do we need containers?
@Cactus Yes. Try it!
Dec
18
comment Functional programming: Curry & Fold - what are the etymologies?
One big problem with the term "fold" is that it is ambiguous in a way that the paradigmatic example of lists does not effectively expose. It means both "structure-preserving recursion" (a.k.a. "catamorphism", "iteration") and "structure-destroying accumulation" (a.k.a. "reduce", "crush"). The latter preserves only the structure of a monoid, so it's hilariously misleading to use free monoids (which have only monoid structure anyway) as the typical source type in an example. The term "fold" has thus become a source of misunderstanding (as has the acronym "ADT") and must thus be abandoned.
Dec
18
revised Why do we need containers?
clarification; typo fix
Dec
17
answered Why do we need containers?
Dec
15
comment How to specify the type for a heterogenous collection in a GADT formulated AST?
@user3237465 Yes. Of course both explicit Type t -> and implicit TypeMe t => versions exist. It's not obvious to me that implicit is better than explicit in this respect. But it's certainly good to be light on our feet when choosing the variant we want. It's often good to write an explicit worker, then expose an implicit wrapper.
Dec
14
answered How to specify the type for a heterogenous collection in a GADT formulated AST?
Dec
12
comment Why can't I pattern match on the concatenation function (++) in Haskell?
@ErikAllik It's always worth looking for ideas to steal. I'd certainly like to see more fluidity in the input-output modes of the relations we happen to present functionally.
Dec
12
comment Why can't I pattern match on the concatenation function (++) in Haskell?
But ++ isn't just any old function. It's the "plugging-in" function for sublist-in-list zippers. Within first-order inductive data structures, candidate spatial decompositions are searchable. There is still the matter of prioritising the search, which programmers must somehow be able to do. One way to do it is to allow ambiguity in patterns only when the function is doing a computation in some MonadPlus. That way, the context decides how to interpret the choices signalled during matching. So I think it's a little premature to decide that this isn't worth thinking about.
Dec
11
comment Why can't I pattern match on the concatenation function (++) in Haskell?
Great question! Back in '89, I built a language which allowed, in effect, elem x (_ ++ x : _) = True; elem _ _ = False. I miss it.