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Apr
16
comment ByteStrings in Haskell
Lion: C doesn't have parser combinators for parsing binary files the way Haskell does. This isn't an IO problem, its a parsing problem - something Haskell's particular good at.
Apr
14
comment What are best practices for managing related Cabal packages?
Wouldn't hoopl depend on hoopl-core (so e.g. cabal install will resolve the build chain?)
Mar
19
comment Equivalent of python eval in Haskell
"you can't embed easily the whole ghci repl into your standalone application." -- is also wrong, that's what the hint library does -- export GHCi as a Haskell module. Lambdabot uses it, Yi uses it, riot has used it. Embedding the Haskell interpreter in your Haskell app is not entirely rare, and there's decent support to do so.
Mar
18
comment Equivalent of python eval in Haskell
See the hs-plugins paper for how to preserve the metadata -- it is done via Haskell's compile-time reflection capability (TH), combined with the Data.Dynamic dynamic type mechanism for splice points. cse.unsw.edu.au/~dons/hs-plugins Reflection + runtime code generation + dynamics for splice points gives you a full multistage metaprogramming model.
Mar
18
comment string formatting in Haskell
You should switch to GHC. Hugs is unmaintained, slow, and supports very few of the packages on Hackage. It isn't part of the Haskell Platform specification either.
Mar
18
comment Equivalent of python eval in Haskell
Being statically typed isn't a barrier to runtime metaprogramming. It just means your 'eval' function also needs to do type checking. Which the Haskell plugins and hint packages do. Typed runtime metaprogramming.
Mar
13
comment Examples of attoparsec in parsing binary file formats?
Sure, it's just that attoparsec is so new, you'll be pushing out on your own. Just use Data.Binary like everyone else, and you'd be done by now :)
Mar
12
comment Using Haskell's Parsec to parse binary files?
attoparsec is only recently suggested for parsing binary data. At work we go with Data.Binary and cereal. There's far more examples there, and that's what it is designed for. attoparsec may be more general than you need.
Mar
5
comment Using Haskell's type system to enforce modularity
A good example of the 'taint monad' concept, blog.sigfpe.com/2007/04/trivial-monad.html
Mar
4
comment What factors could determine whether Clojure, Scala or Haskell will gain traction?
"practically ooze pride in just how unapproachable their language is" -- I don't know what motivates that comment. Much of the community is working very hard to develop tutorials, online demos tryhaskell.org , libraries, easy installers haskell.org/platform -- all to make it easier to get going.
Mar
4
comment Haskell types frustrating a simple 'average' function
It's not possible to write numToFrac, since Num doesn't provide any conversion functions. Real is the closest thing we have (Num types that can be converted to a Rational), or Integral (Num types that can be converted to unbounded Integers).
Mar
4
comment Haskell types frustrating a simple 'average' function
You can feed it a list of Doubles, since Double is in Real. "average ([1 .. 10] :: [Double])". The Real class adds precisely the ability to construct a rational value from things in Num. That's exactly what you need.
Mar
4
comment Haskell types frustrating a simple 'average' function
You've also fallen for the same trap as Michael. Numeric overloading! 5 is not an integral value. It is any Num. Here it defaults to a fractional value -- you can't pass in Int or Integer. -- as you'll get No instance for (Fractional Int)
Mar
3
comment haskell vs python typing
Of course, though, we have the perfectly statically typed: if someError then Nothing else Just a Yay for polymorphic data structures.
Feb
27
comment What does the >> symbol mean in Haskell
Answering with "which are difficult-to-understand things" doesn't clarify. It sets the reader up for failure, I think.
Feb
27
comment Efficient recursion in functional programming vs. inefficient recursion in different paradigms
Isaac is right. Functional languages also tend to make function calls very cheap (a jump) and allocation on the heap cheap (bumping a pointer). That is combined with a love of recursive types (like lists) and recursive techniques (like induction) all adds up to heavy use of recursion, while retaining performance.
Feb
26
comment Efficient recursion in functional programming vs. inefficient recursion in different paradigms
I wrote this up in more detail: donsbot.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/…
Feb
26
comment Haskell as a highly concurrent server
Sorry for jumping on the comment like that, it's been a long day :}
Feb
26
comment Haskell as a highly concurrent server
And I strongly disagree that "there is a lot of stuff lacking in order to really kill it on the perf front server-side" -- performance is excellent, and a few million threads is easily doable today. We build and benchmark concurrent servers all the time at Galois, and performance is rarely an issue -- Erlang's overheads are shocking in comparison (it is aimed at a different use case: distributed systems, not high perf. servers).
Feb
26
comment Haskell as a highly concurrent server
@Kevin, almost, but you got some details wrong. Firstly, the speaker was Johan Tibell from Google/Youtube, and select() itself isn't a big problem (having 1024 simultaneous handles is a bit rare) -- and anyway, you don't need to wait, the event lib, which uses epoll, is already available: github.com/tibbe/event You can see details here: donsbot.wordpress.com/2010/01/17/…