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  • 0 posts edited
  • 13 helpful flags
  • 45 votes cast
Apr
20
awarded  Constituent
Apr
13
awarded  Caucus
Apr
4
accepted Object-like macro definition starting with a left paren
Apr
4
asked Object-like macro definition starting with a left paren
Feb
26
asked Deducing the selected overloaded function type for given argument types
Jan
11
comment Destructor errors
@user3572267 A standard container is something like std::vector or std::list. What you're making appears similar to std::vector.
Jan
11
comment Printing the addresses of variables in decimal
@kuhaku You're probably compiling a 32-bit binary (the default in Visual Studio). Even if you're on a 64-bit OS, a 32-bit binary will have 32-bit addresses. The size difference is why it's a good idea to use uintptr_t, it's always the right size to hold a pointer. It's also possible that your 64-bit address just happens to fit in 32 bits, but IIRC the usermode addressing scheme of Windows would make that unusual. The fact that casting to int compiles for you suggests the former, unless your compiler is violating 5.2.10p4 of the standard.
Jan
11
comment Printing the addresses of variables in decimal
If I were doing this in real code, I would prefer a reinterpret_cast here, but +1 for uintptr_t.
Jan
11
comment Printing the addresses of variables in decimal
@kuhaku There's a difference between "it prints an integer" and "it prints the correct integer". You'll silently lose information if you cast a 64-bit pointer to a 32-bit int. And if you're being strictly standards compliant, casting a pointer directly to a smaller type is not allowed. I would recommend uintptr_t as ravi mentioned when you want to represent a pointer as an integer.
Jan
7
accepted Cross-compiling from OS X to Windows using clang and the Visual Studio 2013 runtime
Nov
26
asked Cross-compiling from OS X to Windows using clang and the Visual Studio 2013 runtime
Nov
26
answered Cross-compiling from OS X to Windows using clang and the Visual Studio 2013 runtime
Oct
28
accepted Scope of nested function declaration in C++
Oct
28
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
28
asked Scope of nested function declaration in C++
Oct
13
reviewed No Action Needed BinaryJs + Audio API schedule array buffers
Oct
13
awarded  Custodian
Oct
4
comment What exactly is template constants in c++, and how we can use them?
You can use templates in C++ code when using CUDA, but the <<< syntax is really a glorified way of passing extra arguments (similar to the implicit this pointer in member functions) so that you can access things like the thread ID. I'm not sure if nvcc allows you to have a __global__ function template (quick searching suggests that it does), but even if it did, your example doesn't have proper template arguments. The second example in particular suggests you may be misunderstanding how templates work; non-type template parameters can't be specialized with types...
Oct
4
answered What exactly is template constants in c++, and how we can use them?
Aug
13
answered C# IsPrime skips a prime number