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Aug
24
comment Netbeans: Navigate-> Go To Declaration/Definition BROKEN with “Cannot Open Element” on C++ 64-bit Ubuntu
Project-dependent. Didn't work for NB 8.0 on a particular project. There is some thought that mixing C code with C++ code may bollix the system, although this hypothesis is unverified.
Jul
30
comment Getting a stack overflow exception when declaring a large array
"I am only sieve for you"--The Zohan
Mar
7
comment Struct assignment or memcpy?
Major problem on s = mystruct between struct s and struct * s. Both work nicely with equals, so you can't see the difference by reading. *s gives you identical, while struct s gives you a copy. When it comes time to deallocate(s), this works fine with the identical struct * s; but it leaks mystruct if you foolishly do only one dealloc with the struct s version. It is also faster to work with pointers. Just keep what you're doing in mind, and then things should be fine. YMMV.
Feb
10
comment MySQL - SELECT all columns WHERE one column is DISTINCT
@CMCDragonkai: Please kindly read the manual. SELECT returns ALL rows that match its query. Order can be random and is never guaranteed; use an ORDER BY clause if you need otherwise. See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1793147/sql-best-practice-to-deal-with-defau‌​lt-sort-order. Good luck.
Feb
5
comment How do I find the length of an array?
Doesn't work for int * global = new int[4].
Feb
5
comment How do I find the length of an array?
I believe this one only works for local variables that are on the stack.
Feb
5
comment How do I find the length of an array?
Doesn't work for C++ "new" arrays held by a pointer. You get the size of the pointer (4 bytes) or the size of its first element if you dereference it.
Jan
31
comment Netbeans deletes initial whitespace in C++ comments; make it stop
ping--still outstanding, needed, unanswered, 0 for 0.
Dec
3
comment Netbeans: Navigate-> Go To Declaration/Definition BROKEN with “Cannot Open Element” on C++ 64-bit Ubuntu
Works for many projects, does not work for some projects that compile and link. Can't tell difference. There were two different paths to an include .h with the same name, but this possible stumbling block got cleaned up and that project still doesn't work. It does look like today at least it's project-dependent, although I think I've seen cases in which the contagion spreads across projects spontaneously.
Nov
18
comment Netbeans: Navigate-> Go To Declaration/Definition BROKEN with “Cannot Open Element” on C++ 64-bit Ubuntu
Yes. See below. It's now an official answer. Apparently there are some cases in which it doesn't work, but it did the trick for me. I've been waiting for the answer to this for two years, various versions have been broken for that long. Thank you for your interest.
Nov
16
comment What is the difference between a deep copy and a shallow copy?
this only works in languages that use pointers to represent strings. The point that DHA is trying to make is that shallow copy only duplicates pointers to the identical (singular) original content, while deep copy clones the referenced content of the pointers as well. Both methods copy surface content. If the language stores strings as surface literal content, e.g. inside a WAV header, this example will not work. Note this is probably too picky for most real-life problems that are not esoteric.
Nov
14
comment Netbeans: Navigate-> Go To Declaration/Definition BROKEN with “Cannot Open Element” on C++ 64-bit Ubuntu
One site suggests "Please try to close NetBeans, delete cache dir /home/user/.cache/netbeans/8.0rc1 and start NetBeans again."
Nov
14
comment Netbeans: Navigate-> Go To Declaration/Definition BROKEN with “Cannot Open Element” on C++ 64-bit Ubuntu
It's doing it again, now, on a different machine, with 8.0. Seems to be all the way across the board, previous projects that were working now can no longer search.
Sep
19
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
I think nos's observation that the compiling and linking stages are separate, could be key. However, by Link time, I would guess that the problem has already been cast in iron--either the objects are already compatible, or they aren't--so it really does come back down to the conditional definition at Compile time. I don't believe the linker is going to change the symbols in the .o, so as to ensure compatibility? I can't believe that a .o gets compiled with two sets of symbols, one C style and one C++, which then somehow get chosen at link time based on gcc vs. g++? That would be unlikely.
Sep
19
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
As a brief case in which this fails, start with a child routine child.c in C, to be called by parent main.cpp. Modify its header child.h by inserting this code around the definitions. This does in fact work for the gcc compiler/linker. However, when using g++, the compiler quietly changes the child's object representation into a C++ style upon compilation. But the parent is still expecting the C style, because the included header is specifying extern "C". As a result, the final linkage fails, under g++. The extern "C"'s should have been left out when using the g++ compiler/linker, I think.
Sep
19
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
It DOES correctly tell the difference between the two compilers when the source code is in C, and not in C++. That is, if I'm working with main.c and not main.cpp, this flag WILL tell the difference between gcc and g++. However, as the extern "C" directive is only useful in C++, it's unclear how this can solve the general problem.
Sep
19
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
This is a standard first-order way to shim C code so that it fits into either C or C++, under gcc. It does not look like it addresses the C++ problem I'm attacking.
Sep
18
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
Regretfully, this does not solve the question that was asked, see edit. Thanks.
Sep
18
comment #ifdef flag to tell difference between gcc and g++ compilers?
When maintaining large legacy systems, sometimes code is compiled using gcc and sometimes using g++. g++ in general makes it easier to compile and link mixed systems of C++ and C together, and so is the preferred compiler of use. However, arbitrarily ripping out all the extern "C" declarations is guaranteed to break other legacy code. Hence the need for conditional compilation. Thanks.
Sep
18
comment What's the difference between gcc and g++/gcc-c++?
because it's using "new" as a variable name, ho ho.