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seen Dec 20 at 13:49

Oct
23
comment Dynamic scoping in each evaluation direction
This is cross-posted on Computer Science StackExchange.
Oct
23
answered Why is my method repeating when I run
Oct
20
awarded  java
Sep
30
comment Intersection of two DFA, how many states? Final States?
Formatting is messed up for your definition of A; do you mean w^2 such that w contains 011? Your regular expression for B describes exactly two strings: 001 and 011. Is this intentional? Once you have machines for A and B, just convert them to minimal DFAs, compute the product and then minimize the result.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
comment Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
@radhika If you have additional questions, can you please add them, with examples, to your question? It's rather hard to follow the questions in the comments. Thanks for your understanding.
Sep
30
comment Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
plus "glue" at the local stage.
Sep
30
comment Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
@radhika It's O(1) for binary search because, for each call of the algorithm, the amount of non-recursive work is constant. True, in each recursive call, you do that same amount of work over and over again, but that's already taken into account by the Master Method. Think of the f(n) as the "glue"; recursive algorithms break problems into subproblems, solve those using the same method, then "glue" the pieces together to form the overall solution. f(n) represents the time it takes the "glue" to run on a given input size. The total runtime is the sum of total runtimes on subproblems,
Sep
30
answered Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
Sep
28
awarded  c
Sep
25
answered Regular language, L1 and L2
Sep
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
2
answered Time complexity of creating a BST with minimal height given a sorted array with elements in increasing order
Aug
29
comment How to find number of triangles in a given undirected graph?
The naïve solution is O(v^3), which is (close to) an optimal asymptotic upper bound on the worst case. It's dumb for sparse graphs, but for highly connected graphs its overhead isn't bad. If you're interested and don't know what I'm hinting at, let me know and I'll add an answer. Come to think of it, you can implement something quite similar with is O(e^3) and which is great for sparse graphs, and dumb for highly-connected graphs. Only when |E| ~= |V| does the naïve method do bad compared to something more complicated.
Aug
29
revised Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
added 617 characters in body
Aug
29
revised Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
added 67 characters in body
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@MarkRansom That's a fair criticism based on the question as it is now, although the phrasing of the original question suggests that this wasn't the asker's real intent. It looks like the first edit changed the meaning of the question slightly in this regard. I'll go ahead and roll that part of the question back so that it is more in line with this answer.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
To whomever downvoted this: please feel free to let me know how this answer could be improved. Otherwise, no hard feelings, of course.
Aug
29
comment NFA to DFA conversion = deterministic?
Please avoid cross-posting questions on multiple SE network sites. If you're happy with templatetypedef's answer here, please flag your question at Computer Science StackExchange for deletion. THanks.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@ankitG A cursory inspection suggests these only support fixed-size inputs - 32 bits, apparently. It doesn't make much sense to discuss asymptotic performance for inputs which cannot grow arbitrarily large. If this restriction were removed, and bitwise arithmetic were implemented in such a way that it would work with arbitrary-length input, then yes, it would be O(n) since any bitwise operator would need to inspect the values of all O(n) bits, though presumably not much more than that.