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Oct
23
comment Dynamic scoping in each evaluation direction
This is cross-posted on Computer Science StackExchange.
Sep
30
comment Intersection of two DFA, how many states? Final States?
Formatting is messed up for your definition of A; do you mean w^2 such that w contains 011? Your regular expression for B describes exactly two strings: 001 and 011. Is this intentional? Once you have machines for A and B, just convert them to minimal DFAs, compute the product and then minimize the result.
Sep
30
comment Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
@radhika If you have additional questions, can you please add them, with examples, to your question? It's rather hard to follow the questions in the comments. Thanks for your understanding.
Sep
30
comment Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
plus "glue" at the local stage.
Sep
30
comment Solving Recurrence relation by master method and its analysis
@radhika It's O(1) for binary search because, for each call of the algorithm, the amount of non-recursive work is constant. True, in each recursive call, you do that same amount of work over and over again, but that's already taken into account by the Master Method. Think of the f(n) as the "glue"; recursive algorithms break problems into subproblems, solve those using the same method, then "glue" the pieces together to form the overall solution. f(n) represents the time it takes the "glue" to run on a given input size. The total runtime is the sum of total runtimes on subproblems,
Aug
29
comment How to find number of triangles in a given undirected graph?
The naïve solution is O(v^3), which is (close to) an optimal asymptotic upper bound on the worst case. It's dumb for sparse graphs, but for highly connected graphs its overhead isn't bad. If you're interested and don't know what I'm hinting at, let me know and I'll add an answer. Come to think of it, you can implement something quite similar with is O(e^3) and which is great for sparse graphs, and dumb for highly-connected graphs. Only when |E| ~= |V| does the naïve method do bad compared to something more complicated.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@MarkRansom That's a fair criticism based on the question as it is now, although the phrasing of the original question suggests that this wasn't the asker's real intent. It looks like the first edit changed the meaning of the question slightly in this regard. I'll go ahead and roll that part of the question back so that it is more in line with this answer.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
To whomever downvoted this: please feel free to let me know how this answer could be improved. Otherwise, no hard feelings, of course.
Aug
29
comment NFA to DFA conversion = deterministic?
Please avoid cross-posting questions on multiple SE network sites. If you're happy with templatetypedef's answer here, please flag your question at Computer Science StackExchange for deletion. THanks.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@ankitG A cursory inspection suggests these only support fixed-size inputs - 32 bits, apparently. It doesn't make much sense to discuss asymptotic performance for inputs which cannot grow arbitrarily large. If this restriction were removed, and bitwise arithmetic were implemented in such a way that it would work with arbitrary-length input, then yes, it would be O(n) since any bitwise operator would need to inspect the values of all O(n) bits, though presumably not much more than that.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@ankitG Note also how this compares to the (what I assume you mean by) "brute-force" solution. The number of steps in that method works in terms of the number represented, rather than the number of bits in the representation, and I would therefore not be surprised if the complexity of that turned out to be exponential, i.e., O(2^n).
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@ankitG It's O(n). At worst, you first look through the whole string, then reverse the whole string. Both are O(n), and adding them is O(n). Note that you never have to reverse the string more than once. This is theoretically optimal for the problem when it's not restricted to binary strings of a certain length. As David points out in his comments on the question, when values are restricted (e.g., to 32 bit words), you can indeed do better than this using, e.g., the kinds of ugly hacks that Asuka links to in the other answer.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@ankitG Yes, of course you're right: reversing will be equivalent since the string must be of the form 0...01...1. Otherwise, we would have found an occurrence of 10 earlier. Noting this.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@shekharsuman Good point, this is good to clarify.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
@DavidEisenstat What RAM system, practical or theoretical, can perform bitwise operations on strings of arbitrary length in O(1)? Perhaps I'm just being a pedant, but the question might be better rendered "how can it be done for bit strings of the word length using a fixed number of instructions"? That might better capture the intent, if that is the intent.
Aug
29
comment Binary Number Having same number of 0s and 1s
It's not always possible, and in any case it's not possible in O(1) in any meaningful sense (why should bitwise operators be O(1) when the problem size is the bit length?) That said, @Setzer22 had an answer that was close, and was only missing one bit: after you find the bit to shift right, you have to shift all 1 bits to the right of that as far left as they will go.
Aug
16
comment Transition State Diagram for the automata
@user3738247 I'd be happy to - what part needs clarification?
Aug
11
comment Adding annotations to the EDM in OData v4 in ASP.NET Web Api 2.2
Thanks for the link! Am I to understand that it's not possible to add annotations using ASP.NET Web Services 2, or are annotations just not a thing in OData v4? Are there other Windows libraries for working with OData v4 that can add in annotations? ODataLib, maybe? Thanks for your help.
Aug
8
comment gwmi Win32_UserAccount freezes PowerShell
@JamesBrown It certainly seems like it should be easy. If you know the domain and user name explicitly, you can use "Get-CimInstance -Namespace root/cimv2 -Query "select * from Win32_UserAccount where Domain='your domain' and Name='your username'"... this works with good performance on my system.
Aug
8
comment gwmi Win32_UserAccount freezes PowerShell
Not sure how useful this is, but Win32_Desktop returns information only for local "accounts"... what information are you trying to get? Getting associated instances hangs as well, so it looks like that's not any more efficient than querying UserAccount directly.