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Dec
30
comment What is the typical speed of a memory allocation in Java?
Actually, I've since discovered that running out of space in the young generation is what's causing the problem. The promotion of objects into the permanent generation seems to be costly - perhaps because GC on that is costly, yes. My benchmark didn't take into account that in some of my use cases, the objects being created will die in the young generation. A good example of how Java benchmarks can be utterly deceptive.
Dec
27
comment What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
@DarrenEngwirda: do you consider an allocation (without zeroing out memory) as O(1) time? If yes, it's possible. If not, then I don't think it's possible either.
Dec
27
comment Concept check: Java's heap-only memory allocation model doesn't mean it has no function call stack, right?
Well, Java can also decide to allocate objects on the stack if it determines they never escape the current function call. That may not have been implemented as of the time of the above comment, though.
Dec
27
asked What is the typical speed of a memory allocation in Java?
Dec
27
comment Should a virtual function essentially have a definition
Concise and pretty much says it all.
Dec
27
answered Why should a Comparator implement Serializable?
Dec
26
awarded  Tumbleweed
Dec
25
comment What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
@AaronMcDaid: No, that's the right analysis regarding list and vector. In the update to my question, I've posted an algorithm by which something could be both stored in an array for random access and still have constant worst-case insert if you're willing to assume O(1) memory block allocations (no O(n) copy needed). But, as discussed here, O(1) allocations are still not a very good assumption.
Dec
25
revised What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
simplified the question
Dec
25
revised What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
simplified the question
Dec
25
comment What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
@Mehrdad: I agree that it's somewhat doubtful C++ could allocate faster than log-time, but for languages that can move and compact allocated memory (e.g. Java), I don't see why allocation couldn't be made to be O(1). Java zeroes out all memory locations before giving them to you, so it's a bad example, but you get the idea...I'm just not convinced allocation speed is some kind of fundamental limitation that transcends C++. Though, it is C++ we're talking here, and you're probably right about C++.
Dec
25
comment What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
Why is it so completely impossible to have constant-time memory allocation, at least on some systems? What makes it fundamentally impossible, at least if you don't need to zero out the memory?
Dec
25
accepted What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
Dec
25
comment What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
@Mehrdad: and yes, I see the virtual memory point you're making, but just for fun, we can make a distinction between worst-case O(1) and amortized O(1) talking about the amount of work done in the algorithm and not the operating system. I do agree that in practice, your point is valid, and the difference is likely only important for very specific systems that have very particular super-low-latency requirements.
Dec
25
comment What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
Guys, check out my update to the question. I mention a data structure that could indeed - unless I'm mistaken, and I would like to see comments - achieve O(1) insertion and deletion without amortization if you're willing to assume new and delete can run in O(1) (perhaps possible if no zeroing out of the memory is needed like in this case).
Dec
25
revised What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?
added 3376 characters in body
Dec
25
comment What languages other than Java have security models for unprivileged vs. privileged code?
Accepted for being the answer to cover a lot of ground.
Dec
25
accepted What languages other than Java have security models for unprivileged vs. privileged code?
Dec
25
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
24
asked What data structure, exactly, are deques in C++?