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Sep
5
accepted Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
Sep
5
comment Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
+1 @Laurent I've added your input to the summary.
Sep
5
revised Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
Updated the summary part of the question and moved it to an answer.
Sep
5
answered Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
Sep
5
comment clang++ 3.2 linker not finding C++ stdlib
+1 because it solves my problem too. But how can you (or anyone) tell from the error messages that the compile and linking were done using different header/libraries?
Sep
4
revised Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
Added detail discovered since the original post.
Sep
3
awarded  Yearling
Sep
3
revised Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
added 519 characters in body
Sep
3
asked Options for using C++11 <regex> with a circa 2013 compiler
Aug
20
accepted noexcept(expression) - where expression is a noexcept function that actually throws
Aug
20
comment noexcept(expression) - where expression is a noexcept function that actually throws
@Casey: +1, thanks.
Aug
20
asked noexcept(expression) - where expression is a noexcept function that actually throws
Aug
18
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
In the above, never mind about the "appropriate constructor". I mean any API function taking an non-const where further investigation shows that it doesn't modify it's parameter.
Aug
17
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
@gx_ thanks for your input. I did come across that same post (and other materials) later. I can see that it is essentially rvalue_cast<>() and I can also see the point of not calling it that. I also see that move means "move if you can". I guess I was stuck on the lack of symmetry with a common use of const_cast. A calling program/programmer making use of a lot of const-correctness knows right away that some API does not have an appropriate constructor - does not support the intent. Then they put in the const_cast so it works, and future maintainers see it too.
Aug
16
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
Your idea of std::move not being the same as a non-existent std::force_move gets the crux of the question and pretty much answers the question. As it is then is std::move is more like std::move_if_you_can. I don't have a bug to resolve or an optimization to make. What I wanted to know (and you answered) is (for what ever scenario - and I don't care what) if there is something like a compiler switch that warned that requests for a move resulted in copies instead. If nothing else it could inform you which of your classes you ought to implement move semantics for later.
Aug
16
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
@aaronman - thanks to the link on how to check if something is move constructable. To answer your question - I am asking the compiler to report that I am calling a function that does not exist rather than silently linking my call to different function. I think you are both misunderstanding the original question.
Aug
16
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
@zdan - if someone attempts to copy construct an object with an existing CONST object and there is no copy constructor taking a CONST reference then the compiler will say there is no appropriate constructor in the structure - period. That is logical and safe. Why then, if someone attempts to move-construct an object when there is no move-constructor, does the compiler think that it is OK to resolve the call to a DIFFERENT constructor rather than producing the same error?
Aug
16
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
@GManNickG - I did NOT find a bug in a legacy API and I am not asking how to work around it. This is a theoretical question. Answers like: test it, fix it and work around it are not constructive.
Aug
16
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
First line - I want to know if there is a safe programming practice that would alert a coder to this subtle behavior when it takes place or, even better, avoid it in the first place. In other words, the compiler ought to warn that there is no matching ctor rather than just resolving to a different one.
Aug
16
comment std::move( ) calls copy-ctor in the absence of a move-ctor. Why and how to prevent it?
Let me try to be more clear then. Imagine that a programmer is using a legacy API he/she does-not-control and mistakenly attempts to use move semantics that are not supported by the API. The code compiles and runs without an exception at the point of the call. So yes, how do you make the compiler warn you that there is no move constructor.