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Aug
10
awarded  Yearling
Jul
26
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
15
awarded  Guru
May
23
revised What's the difference between String and string?
added 129 characters in body
May
21
comment Correct way to create an array with N number of elements without the old 'new Array(N)'?
This is a bad habit. In generally, omitting the new keyword is dangerous and incorrect. It just happens that the Array constructor behaves nicely and corrects your mistake by effectively re-calling the constructor with the new keyword internally.
Apr
20
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
18
revised How do you determine the size of a file in C?
forgot to close; updated code a bit; added caveat
Apr
18
comment How do you determine the size of a file in C?
Yes, you should. However, unless there's a really compelling reason not write platform-specific, though, you should probably just use a platform-specific call rather than the open/seek-end/tell/close pattern.
Apr
6
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@DRVic, it's not the typical case that all the data is one gigantic array that can be written/read that way. And when it is, an mmap would probably be a better option.
Apr
5
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@DRVic, unbuffered isn't automatically faster. In fact it's generally slower unless you're doing your own buffering.
Apr
5
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@CycoMatto, I would pick either human-readable or binary and stick with it. Mixing the two will give you a file that doesn't really display properly in a text editor and doesn't have the speed benefits of binary. I go with human-readable as the default for my work and only go to binary if there's a compelling reason. If you need both, then I would write them as completely separate files so you can easily config the text version off.
Apr
5
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@CycoMatto, use fwrite and fread to allow writing/reading binary data directly.
Apr
4
comment windows8 - _dup,_dup2
Can you clarify what you're expecting vs what you're actually getting? Your question is a bit confusing. Are you seeing "redirect 999" in the tmp file, or "redirect 0", nothing at all, or something else?
Apr
4
comment How does the g++ implementation handle this situation?
@wolfgang, the vtable pointer goes at the beginning specifically to avoid pointer adjustment. The typical scenario is not casting from one type to a subtype (or vice versa). The typical scenario is calling virtual functions on one type. If you put the vtable pointer first, you skip the cost of offsetting the object pointer when calling virtual functions. i.e. "objPtr->vptr" maps to just "*objPtr" instead of "*(objPtr + N)".
Apr
4
comment typecasting with virtual functions
P.S. Sorry for the double-comment. My first one got mangled and I didn't realize it went through. After digging a bit further, it looks like the empty base class optimization is indeed the factor here.
Apr
4
comment typecasting with virtual functions
@TamásSzelei, It looks like GCC puts the vtable for B after all of A's fields. So in memory you've got [a_fields|b_vtbl|b_fields|c_fields]. (A has no fields in the example given, but that doesn't change the layout conceptually.) I haven't confirmed that this is exactly what GCC is doing, but it seems the most likely scenario. This means it's optimizing for casting (which now requires no pointer offset) at the expense of virtual function calling (which now requires the offset that the cast avoided).
Apr
4
comment typecasting with virtual functions
@TamásSzelei, I don't knows for certain. Presumably GCC puts the vtable for B after all of A's fields. Or alternatively, GCC might recognize that since A has no fields of its own, it doesn't really matter where 'pA there's no need to bother changing the pointer when casting between A and B (or C).
Apr
3
comment typecasting with virtual functions
@TamásSzelei, the behavior he describes is correct (for his compiler). It's an implementation detail, but if you test this on VC++, you'll find that the pointer values are indeed referencing different memory locations.
Apr
3
answered typecasting with virtual functions