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visits member for 5 years, 11 months
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Developer at MSFT


Jan
27
comment Absolute Beginner's Guide to Bit Shifting?
@ambigram_maker, in a sense, bit shifting is not even applicable to integers, because it operates on bit fields, a lower level of abstraction. C-style languages generally overload the integral types to represent both whole numbers and bit fields, but this is basically historical coincidence. Shifts could be defined for floating-point types, but the effect would be equivalent to casting to an integer type of the same size, shifting, and casting back to the floating point type. This would result in junk most of the time, though, whereas a shift on an integer happens to produce a useful result.
Jan
27
comment Absolute Beginner's Guide to Bit Shifting?
@Mahn, you're reading it backwards from my intent. Substitute Y for X means to replace X with Y. Y is the substitute for X. So the shift is the substitute for the multiplication.
Jan
27
comment How do you determine the size of a file in C?
I agree. The cast was to match the original prototype in the question. I can't recall why I turned it into unsigned long instead of unsigned int, though.
Apr
2
comment How do you determine the size of a file in C?
@Justin, you should probably open a new question specifically about the issue you're running into, and provide details about the platform you're on, how you're accessing the files, and what the behavior is.
Oct
26
comment How do I tell if a variable has a numeric value in Perl?
That will throw warnings if you use "-w" or "use warnings;".
Sep
26
comment When should I not use the ThreadPool in .Net?
@Will, no worries. I knew you were joking about the votering (we could manage better than 22 votes in 4 years), but wasn't sure how serious you were about the "It's not that good" comment. :)
Sep
21
comment Absolute Beginner's Guide to Bit Shifting?
@Geek, if you multiply a large enough negative number, you'll underflow and end up with a positive number. You'll get the same effect if you shift. e.g. with 32-bit signed integers, -2000000000 << 1 == -2000000000 * 2 == 294967296. You can't "get back" the sign bit, because the answer is not negative. Integral arithmetic is modular in C, Java, and similar languages.
Sep
21
comment When should I not use the ThreadPool in .Net?
@hwiechers, it's half answer, half reply. SO didn't have comments when this was posted, and I'm not willing to waste the time to go through all my old answers and convert them to comments.
Sep
21
comment When should I not use the ThreadPool in .Net?
@Will, it's a 4-year old comment. It's averaging less than half an upvote per month. Hardly an unbelievable level of votes.
Sep
21
comment Pay for vmware or use Open Source?
Thanks, Jocelyn, for clarifying that I should have used a comment, four years ago, when comments were not implemented on Stack Overflow.
May
21
comment Correct way to create an array with N number of elements without the old 'new Array(N)'?
This is a bad habit. In generally, omitting the new keyword is dangerous and incorrect. It just happens that the Array constructor behaves nicely and corrects your mistake by effectively re-calling the constructor with the new keyword internally.
Apr
18
comment How do you determine the size of a file in C?
Yes, you should. However, unless there's a really compelling reason not write platform-specific, though, you should probably just use a platform-specific call rather than the open/seek-end/tell/close pattern.
Apr
6
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@DRVic, it's not the typical case that all the data is one gigantic array that can be written/read that way. And when it is, an mmap would probably be a better option.
Apr
5
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@DRVic, unbuffered isn't automatically faster. In fact it's generally slower unless you're doing your own buffering.
Apr
5
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@CycoMatto, I would pick either human-readable or binary and stick with it. Mixing the two will give you a file that doesn't really display properly in a text editor and doesn't have the speed benefits of binary. I go with human-readable as the default for my work and only go to binary if there's a compelling reason. If you need both, then I would write them as completely separate files so you can easily config the text version off.
Apr
5
comment c++: how to optimize IO?
@CycoMatto, use fwrite and fread to allow writing/reading binary data directly.
Apr
4
comment windows8 - _dup,_dup2
Can you clarify what you're expecting vs what you're actually getting? Your question is a bit confusing. Are you seeing "redirect 999" in the tmp file, or "redirect 0", nothing at all, or something else?
Apr
4
comment How does the g++ implementation handle this situation?
@wolfgang, the vtable pointer goes at the beginning specifically to avoid pointer adjustment. The typical scenario is not casting from one type to a subtype (or vice versa). The typical scenario is calling virtual functions on one type. If you put the vtable pointer first, you skip the cost of offsetting the object pointer when calling virtual functions. i.e. "objPtr->vptr" maps to just "*objPtr" instead of "*(objPtr + N)".
Apr
4
comment typecasting with virtual functions
P.S. Sorry for the double-comment. My first one got mangled and I didn't realize it went through. After digging a bit further, it looks like the empty base class optimization is indeed the factor here.
Apr
4
comment typecasting with virtual functions
@TamásSzelei, It looks like GCC puts the vtable for B after all of A's fields. So in memory you've got [a_fields|b_vtbl|b_fields|c_fields]. (A has no fields in the example given, but that doesn't change the layout conceptually.) I haven't confirmed that this is exactly what GCC is doing, but it seems the most likely scenario. This means it's optimizing for casting (which now requires no pointer offset) at the expense of virtual function calling (which now requires the offset that the cast avoided).