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5m
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
Another scenario is storing unstructured JSON data in a field, such as a save-state for a lesson and page in online educational software. To run a report on who completed a page in less than 5 minutes, for example, I would have to extract a variable from within that JSON page-state string, and it's orders of magnitude faster to use an SQL CLR function to extract the member for comparison, rather than attempt to stream all the data to some middle tier for processing. A query like "select UserID from PageStates where SQLCLRParseJSON(FieldName,'object.membername') = 'checkvalue';" is fastest.
24m
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
The really nice thing is that these classes are written once in C#, and enforce the data types in the application as well as the database, without having to replicate any code. The database and the application literally use the same assembly (dll).
26m
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
Field types like string, int32, int64 are just too generic. By enforcing stronger data types right in the database, I was actually able to eliminate tons of unnecessary checks in the middle-tier, especially null value checks. It was really an interesting side-effect that null values were rendered unnecessary altogether. So there is a class for each type of data like "Username", and instead of being a string that needs checked, it is cast directly to that class, and is guaranteed to be valid within the system, when it first enters the system through a webform or something.
29m
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
Well, it's not business logic at all. Data type constraints are an integral part of the data and should be enforced right in the database. Prior to the SQL CLR, that was not really possible, aside from rudimentary checks like numeric size. If a value is supposed to be an integer between 1 and 100, that's fairly easy to create a TSQL check constraint for it, but to limit a string to exclude certain characters... it's simply hands-down faster to implement the check as a CLR routine.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
I was considering porting my application to a different database server, but I just can't find any other server that has anything even remotely close to the capabilities and performance of the SQL CLR.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
Yes, similar technology in a different database server. The idea is to be able to leverage a large framework like .NET or Java and write functions that can be used directly in SQL. With "shared memory" I basically mean static variables. If I call an SQL CLR method, it can access static variables like any normal .NET application, so I could increment a counter for example or look something up in a runtime cache when a function is called.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
If a rule changes, I just redeploy the assembly, and SQL Server automatically says "check constraints are no longer trusted". I then reactive them, it checks all the data in just a few seconds, and I'm back in business. I've just never seen anything like it. It's one of those things that I just can't believe no other database has. The ability to leverage a large framework like .NET (or at least a large part of it), and use it directly within TSQL is just incredible, IMO.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
Furthermore, the RegexConstrainedString class is immutable and actually caches the instances, so it actually performs a static cache lookup while trying to create an instance of the type, which is even faster. I can run, for example, a regex that makes sure that some text thousands of characters long contains only ASCII characters or omits a specific reserved character, and run that on 2 million database rows in a matter of a couple seconds... AS A CHECK CONSTRAINT. Such a thing would be impossible with TSQL, if not astronomically slower.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
In essense, a single .NET/CLR class enforces data type rules not only in the application that consumes the data, but within the database itself as well. It's functionally impossible for bad data to enter the database or the system, since such type-checking check constraints, when active and trusted, prevent bad modification even through something like SSMS. Furthermore, some types like EmailAddress can be broken down for sorting, for example based on only that preceding the "@" sign, which may be doable in TSQL, but others are much better handled through .NET code.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
For example, I have a check-constraints that call a Boolean CLR routine, which ensures the field matches a regular expression as it is committed to the database, by any means at all, either through an SQL update or modifications using SQL Server Management Studio. I have automated deployment mechanism that emits low-level MSIL code for such functions that simply attempt to cast the string to a specific data class such as "EmailAddress" or "Username", which all inherit from a RegexConstrainedStringClass.
7h
comment Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
There are no design flaws, the CLR is just simpler and faster to do things than TSQL, as well as doing things that TSQL can't do, or would involve reinventing the wheel in TSQL.
8h
asked Is there any database technology comparable to the SQL CLR?
Aug
26
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
10
awarded  Revival
Jul
26
awarded  Good Question
Jul
24
revised Stalling program until JSFL file finishes
added 8 characters in body
Jul
24
comment Stalling program until JSFL file finishes
"Executing a JSFL file" is actually "starting the flash.exe process and passing it a JSLF filename as a parameter." That's what completes immediately. The Flash process will then processes the JSLF file and remain open indefinitely, so waiting on the process will just lock your app until you manually close Flash. The only way an external app can known when Flash has finished an internal operation like processing a JSFL file is to call "runCommandLine" at end of the JSLF script to send a signal to your main application indicating the end of the script has been reached. See my posted answer.
Jul
24
answered Stalling program until JSFL file finishes
Jul
3
comment Weird: C# Type or Namespace name could not be found - Builds successfully
My DLL was built for Framework 4.5, and the app I was trying to use it was built for Framework 4. After rebuilding the DLL for the older framework, it worked again.
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive