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bio website ericlippert.com
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Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Oct
22
comment Default overload for ambiguous calls
@Jcl: Excellent. Or, even better, return Enumerable.Empty<Expression<Func<T, bool>>>();, and actually represent an empty collection as an empty collection, rather than the absence of a collection.
Oct
22
comment Default overload for ambiguous calls
If you want it to be explicit, consider providing a public const Foo EmptyFoo = null and then encourage the caller to use the descriptive constant. This both resolves the ambiguity and makes the calling code readable.
Oct
22
comment Default overload for ambiguous calls
Or, if the methods are static and the callers are in the class, put the callers and the more desired overloads in a nested class. C# disambiguation logic prefers closer to farther nesting.
Oct
22
comment Default overload for ambiguous calls
Well, there are ways to hint to the compiler but I don't think you'll like any of them. For example, put the less desired ambiguous overloads in a less derived class. C# disambiguation logic always prefers more to less derived.
Oct
22
comment C# casting List types
You have a box of fruit and you're trying to eat the box, not the fruit. If you need a fruit, take one out of the box.
Oct
22
comment Default overload for ambiguous calls
Rather than looking for a non existing mechanism to disambiguate the ambiguous, take this as an opportunity to redesign the interface. What you've got seems very confusing and complex. Any time you expect a caller to pass null is a flag indicating a possible code smell.
Oct
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
22
comment What is the difference between casting and coercing?
@dfeuer interesting data point, thanks! I note that the C#spec does not define "coercion"; my suggestion is just what I personally mean. Given that the term seems poorly defined, I generally avoid it.
Oct
21
comment Foreach variable in closure
Read the whole answer to the question you linked to. It answers your question.
Oct
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
20
revised Get all possible distinct triples using LINQ
added 284 characters in body
Oct
20
comment Getting null from a LINQ query even though I have matching result(s)
@vc74: Ah, I understand the thrust of your question now. You want to iterate over the accounts, keeping track as you go of "the first GBP I saw was..." and so on, so that if you find a USD you bail out immediately, and then if you make it to the end without finding one, you already know whether you have a GBP, etc. That's a nice idea and yes, some kind of accumulator would work. I don't know of any off-the-shelf part that does that but it would be pretty straightforward to build one.
Oct
20
comment Getting null from a LINQ query even though I have matching result(s)
@vc74: But the query given -- the second one, that works -- does have the property already that it bails out as soon as a match is found. That's why I'm confused; you seem to be asking for something you already have.
Oct
20
answered Custom struct types in memory
Oct
20
comment Custom struct types in memory
Thanks for the shout-out. This article is also relevant: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/30/…
Oct
20
comment Getting null from a LINQ query even though I have matching result(s)
@vc74: I'm not sure that I understand the thrust of your question. The list of currencies will be iterated until a match is found; each iteration of the list of currencies iterates until a matching record is found, and then it stops.
Oct
20
comment Getting null from a LINQ query even though I have matching result(s)
@Leron: You understand now that the "or default" means "if the sequence I'm looking for cannot be found, give me null", yes? The order of execution of the query is in the order it appears on the page.
Oct
20
comment Getting null from a LINQ query even though I have matching result(s)
Can you explain what you believe the "or default" part of "first or default" means? Learning why people make mistakes like this helps me design better tools to catch or prevent those mistakes.
Oct
18
awarded  Deputy
Oct
17
comment How many times in a day would System.DateTime.Now.Ticks % 1000 > 1000 return true?
Your coworker's idea is a bad idea. Extracting randomness from timing data is a task that only a tiny handful of people know how to do correctly. If you want random numbers then use a random number generator.