298,354 reputation
676621499
bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
visits member for 5 years, 3 months
seen 1 hour ago

Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Jul
1
comment C# OOP Composition and Generalization at the same time
@adrianm: I confess that this is in some sense an abuse of the generic mechanism; one prefers generic methods to be generic. That is, to be able to handle all types equally well. I have said many times in the past that if you are making a type test on a generic type parameter, you're probably doing something wrong. This would be a possible violation of that guideline. The alternative is to have the method take a Type and return object, which seems hardly better.
Jul
1
comment C# OOP Composition and Generalization at the same time
@adrianm: What would you prefer it to be?
Jun
30
answered C# OOP Composition and Generalization at the same time
Jun
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
27
comment Should IEnumerable returned from OrderBy be evaluated if used multiple times?
Suppose the contents of the unsorted array changed between executions of the query. What should happen?
Jun
27
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
26
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
26
comment What is an operand stack?
See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/11/28/… -- here I discuss the CLR's operand stack, but the principles here apply equally well to the JVM.
Jun
26
comment How to avoid “if” chains?
I have written probably a hundred thousand lines of extremely clear, easy-to-maintain code in this style. The two key things to understand are (1) discipline! establish a clear guideline for the layout of every function and only violate it at extreme need, and (2) understand that what we are doing here is simulating exceptions in a language that does not have them. throw is in many ways worse than goto because with throw it's not even clear from the local context where you're going to end up! Use the same design considerations for goto-style control flow as you would for exceptions.
Jun
25
comment How does the C preprocessor handle circular dependencies?
@Alice: Though cHao could perhaps have expressed themselves more elegantly, the point is well taken. I am basically unconcerned with the correctness proofs of hundred line methods in library code that has a clear specification; I'm concerned about the correctness of entire operating systems, entire databases, and so on, operating in a world with weak memory models, memory-unsafe languages and so on. The techniques that you use to prove the correctness of the STL collections do not scale to the entire Windows OS.
Jun
25
revised Topological sort with support for cyclic dependencies
deleted 12 characters in body
Jun
23
comment How to implement a Non-Binary tree
@leoking a comment is not a good place for a tutorial on immutable data structures. Try reading the immutable tag on my msdn blog and see if that helps.
Jun
23
comment How to implement a Non-Binary tree
@leoking you can make the tree mutable or you can rewrite the spine to produce a new tree on insert. That works better with a normal binary tree than with one of these arbitrary trees, but it is pretty straightforward.
Jun
23
comment Peculiar overload resolution with while (true)
@I3arnon: The people who made the decision are a fair-sized group but the person who implemented that decision was me. The reasoning is: if you have ()=>X() where X() returns a value, odds are good that you meant to use that value; if you meant to ignore it you would have written ()=>{X();}. So if there is a choice between "use the value" and "ignore the value", we choose "use the value" -- we choose Func over Action in those cases where it is ambiguous.
Jun
22
comment Is it possible to create a delegate for *any* Action<T>?
@T.C.: Yes; thanks. I fixed the typo.
Jun
22
revised Is it possible to create a delegate for *any* Action<T>?
deleted 4 characters in body
Jun
22
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
22
comment Why does the C# compiler crash on this code?
I have a hard time figuring out what answer would actually answer the question "why did a program I don't have the source code to crash?" What are you intending to learn from any answer to this question?
Jun
22
comment Is it possible to create a delegate for *any* Action<T>?
@Atomosk: The question as stated is incoherent. I can't figure out what "is it possible to create a delegate for any Action<T> even means. Action<T> is a delegate, so the question is nonsensical. Rather than trying to address the nonsensical question I instead chose to address the other question stated: is there some kind of boxing happening? and the implied question why is there a type mismatch?, as those are actually questions that have answers.
Jun
21
comment Is it possible to create a delegate for *any* Action<T>?
I've closed this as a duplicate, but see my answer below for more details, in case the concepts of covariance and contravariance are unclear to you.