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Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Apr
25
comment Generic method with variance in C#?
Did you intend to declare two completely different things both named "A"? This question is extremely confusing as a result.
Apr
23
comment How does LINQPad compile code?
@Hans: Well, almost. It would be more accurate to say that both csc.exe and the IDE share a common library that performs code analysis.
Apr
23
comment Which C# 4.0 Book would you purchase, and why?
@MK_Dev: I think either book would serve you well. Both assume a reasonable knowledge of the basics, and it sounds like you have that.
Apr
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
22
comment Is there Boxing/Unboxing when casting a struct into a generic interface?
I don't think I agree with your characterization of value types vs reference types. Suppose you have a static field struct C { public static int x; } and a method F() { C.x = 123; }. The change to C.x persists outside of the call to F, but neither C nor C.x are reference types.
Apr
22
comment Is there Boxing/Unboxing when casting a struct into a generic interface?
Generic interface types are interface types. There's nothing special about them that magically prevents boxing.
Apr
22
comment What is the quickest way to compare a C# Dictionary to a 'gold standard' Dictionary for equality?
@Shea: Sure, but that's not what I asked. You can create two dictionaries in the same process that have different policies; I do it every day. Do we know that the dictionaries have the same policy? It is not clear what it means to be equal when two dictionaries have different policies. For example, suppose one dictionary was "A"-->{"DEF"} and case-insensitive and the other was "a"-->{"DEF"}, "A"-->{"DEF"}, case-sensitive. Arguably those two dictionaries are the same; they always agree on every query. But they are of different sizes!
Apr
22
comment What is the quickest way to compare a C# Dictionary to a 'gold standard' Dictionary for equality?
Do we have a guarantee that the two dictionaries have the same policy for performing lookups? For example, is one a case-sensitive dictionary and one is case-insensitive? Having different policies can greatly complicate dictionary comparisons. (This is a problem I face frequently, given that the C# compiler does case-sensitive mappings from identifiers to members, and the VB compiler does case-insensitive mappings.)
Apr
22
revised What is the quickest way to compare a C# Dictionary to a 'gold standard' Dictionary for equality?
added 486 characters in body
Apr
22
answered What is the quickest way to compare a C# Dictionary to a 'gold standard' Dictionary for equality?
Apr
22
comment What is the quickest way to compare a C# Dictionary to a 'gold standard' Dictionary for equality?
@Shea Levy, @Tejs: This code is trivially and obviously wrong. Suppose the dictionary to check is the empty dictionary. The loop is skipped and the function returns true. Even if you fix that, this code is extremely inefficient on large dictionaries or if the list values are long.
Apr
22
comment What is the quickest way to compare a C# Dictionary to a 'gold standard' Dictionary for equality?
When optimizing tasks like this it is helpful to be clear about what case you're optimizing for. Is the common case that needs to be optimized that the two dictionaries are the same, or that they are different? The reason I ask is because a common optimization technique is to do a cheap test that catches 99% of the "different" cases, and then an expensive test that confirms identity. Obviously that is not a good optimization if most of the time the dictionaries really are identical; the cheap test just slows you down.
Apr
22
comment What is more performant in Linq multiple order by?
Since you've written it both ways already try it and see. Then you'll know.
Apr
22
comment Generating Numbers in sequence
This site might help. codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Combinatorics.aspx
Apr
22
comment c# Lock with Thread.Sleep not working
Ticks might have 100 nanosecond resolution, but that doesn't mean that the clock has that level of precision! The clock hardware is only accurate to about 1/64th of a second.
Apr
22
comment How does C# compiler remove Debug.Assert's in release builds?
See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/09/10/… for some thoughts on this question.
Apr
21
comment How To Use Yield Inside A Linq Query
Right. The "Select" returns a sequence of sequences of items. You are assuming that the Select returns a sequence of items -- that it "flattens" the sequence of sequences -- but that's not what Select does; that's what SelectMany does. In your code each sequence in the sequence will be passed to "Where", so "subItem" will be a sequence of items, and a sequence of items doesn't have a Name. Each item has a Name.
Apr
21
comment How to write Implicit Conversion from an Interface to another type?
"SomeWrapper is the only class implementing ISomeWrapper" -- that is waving a big red flag that says "bad code smell here". If there's only one class that implements the interface, then of what value is the interface? Just use the class everywhere.
Apr
21
revised How To Use Yield Inside A Linq Query
added 1074 characters in body
Apr
21
comment How To Use Yield Inside A Linq Query
What is the type of "subItem" in your code? It appears to be a sequence of departments, but you're treating it as a department.