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Jun
9
comment Operator '&' cannot be applied to operands of type 'string' and 'string'
VB developer, by chance? :)
Jun
9
comment What are the implications of asking Reflection APIs to overwrite System.String.Empty?
@Krycklik: You might want to read Shawn Farkas's blog and watch his videos on Channel 9. He talks a lot about these sorts of security model design issues.
Jun
9
comment What are the implications of asking Reflection APIs to overwrite System.String.Empty?
@Krycklik: Since it sounds like you are concerned about code from different code providers attacking each other, you should be aware of another thing. In the .NET 4 security model, partially trusted code that is all of the same trust level is allowed to party on each other's internals. That is, if you load partially trusted Water.DLL and partially trusted Wine.DLL and fully trusted Whiskey.DLL, then Water and Wine can mess with each other's internal properties. Whiskey can mess with the internal properties of all three. Water and Wine can't mess with Whiskey.
Jun
9
comment Use of multicast in C# multicast delegates
@Alex: Multicast delegates are in my opinion simply unnecessary in a world with collection types. There is no justification in my mind that the "sum" of two delegates is a third delegate that invokes the first two. I would prefer to explicitly implement events as some sort of collection of delegates. The "multicast delegate" concept is an unnecessary increase in the "concept count" of .NET; we can get by just fine without it, and it simplifies life considerably if you do so. But of course we are stuck with them now, and have to live with their oddities.
Jun
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
9
revised How do I write an extension function to return the average of a custom type?
added 595 characters in body
Jun
9
revised How do I write an extension function to return the average of a custom type?
added 1 characters in body; added 534 characters in body
Jun
9
answered How do I write an extension function to return the average of a custom type?
Jun
9
comment What are the implications of asking Reflection APIs to overwrite System.String.Empty?
@Krycklik: the .NET security system is not designed to defend in any way whatsoever against hostile fully trusted developers. The security system is designed to protect users from hostile developers who wrote code the users then downloaded off the internet; that is, "partially trusted" code scenarios. If you have hostile developers who can write code and get users to run it with full trust then you're going to have to come up with some process to detect and prosecute them; the .NET runtime says that full trust is full trust.
Jun
9
answered Random class does not create random number?
Jun
9
comment Use of multicast in C# multicast delegates
I long for a day when I can forget about the multicastiness of delegates.
Jun
9
revised How can I ensure that a division of integers is always rounded up?
added 28 characters in body
Jun
9
comment simple question on Math.Round in C#
possible duplicate of How can I ensure that a division of integers is always rounded up?
Jun
9
answered simple question on Math.Round in C#
Jun
9
comment How to calculate changes of nullable numbers with Linq
@Vlad: Hmm, you're right. I guess Bill didn't get to that bit. I'll mention it to him and maybe he can do a follow-up!
Jun
9
comment How to calculate changes of nullable numbers with Linq
@Vlad: OK, you got it. I'll go back in time a couple of weeks and have Bill Wagner write an article on that... and now back to the future again, and done. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/hh124568
Jun
9
answered Nested namespaces
Jun
9
comment How to calculate changes of nullable numbers with Linq
@Arne: You don't need to upgrade just for Zip. If you want the source code to Zip, it is very short. I've put the source code here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/07/zip-me-up.aspx
Jun
9
comment How to calculate changes of nullable numbers with Linq
@mquander: yep, that's the whole point of nullable arithmetic. We automatically "lift" the operations to nullable. Where it breaks down, unfortunately, is in comparisons. In C#, when you compare a null double equal to another null double the result should be null. "null" means "I don't know", and the answer to "does one thing I don't know equal another thing I don't know" is not "true", is not "false", is "I don't know!" But comparisons always produce bools, not nullable bools. VB gets it right; in VB equality is three-valued.
Jun
9
comment How to calculate changes of nullable numbers with Linq
The "hasvalues" are unnecessary regardless. Arithmetic on nullables is already lifted.