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bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 42
visits member for 5 years, 8 months
seen 17 hours ago

Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


May
18
comment derived class accessibility
Though I take your point, the example is poorly motivated. If a constant changes then it should not have been a constant in the first place. Only use constants for things that are actually constant: the number of eggs in a dozen, the atomic number of lead, the value of pi, and so on. If it can possibly change, it isn't a constant.
May
18
comment Cancel request if taking to long to process
What prevents the jitter or the CPU from optimizing away or reordering the read access to the boolean in your example? It's not marked as volatile, so the C# compiler, the jit compiler and the CPU are all permitted to perform optimizations on it that might make _abort always appear to be false.
May
18
comment C# LINQ order by error
@hs2d: you should use the one that sorts correctly for the users of your application. You're the only person here who knows what that is!
May
18
comment What is the purpose of 'volatile' keyword in C#
@Shimmy: You are perfectly capable of finding the specification without my help.
May
17
comment Cancel request if taking to long to process
This is a bad idea. If you can't shut down a thread cleanly then either change the architecture until you can, or run the code in another process, not another thread. Aborting a thread is pure evil and should only be taken on as a last resort.
May
17
comment Implementing pattern matching in C#
@Michael: If you want unsafe covariance on delegate types then you're likely to run into some difficulties. The type system is designed to help you prevent that sort of thing, not help you do it.
May
17
comment Implementing pattern matching in C#
Are you using C# 3 or 4? In C# 4 the Func type is contravariant in its formal parameter types, which gives you more flexibility in the conversions.
May
17
comment Why can't I cast DateTime[] to object[]?
@Jeff: To be picky, you can get around compiler restrictions and cast certain arrays of value type to each other. For example, even though the C# compiler will try to stop you, the CLR permits int[] to be converted to uint[]. What the CLR actually requires is that the element types be assignment compatible, and int is assignment compatible with uint.
May
17
comment Why can't I cast DateTime[] to object[]?
@Kirk: Not in C# it isn't. Or in any language on the CLR. There's no such reference conversion.
May
16
comment C#.NET - Why do members of a static class need to be declared as static? Why isn't it just implicit?
@corlettk: no worries! @Joan: we have a group of MVPs and other industry insiders that we consult regularly on those sorts of things, and sometimes if we have a bunch of them in a room we'll do a "straw poll" sort of vote, but of course it is not binding. I'll also occasionally do straw polls on the blog if we need a quick sanity check from the community on whether a feature is confusing or not.
May
16
comment Is it a good idea to use lambda expression instead of delegates?
Do you mean is it better to use the lambda syntax for an anonymous method than the old C# 2 syntax?
May
16
comment Preventing a file from deletion and change
Your question is missing the most important part. Prevent who from removing the file? This is a security question, but you've left out the threat and the attacker. Also, remember: your application runs on behalf of your user. The user is in charge; the application is their servant, not their master. If your user wants to destroy your file, that's their business; let them. They own the machine, not you.
May
16
comment locking a resource via lock within try. Is it wrong?
@supercat: I totally take your point. But again, this is somewhat of a question-begging situation. The presumption now is that everything is possibly wrong except the IsDangerousState flag. First, what guarantees that it is correct? The assumption here is that state is arbitrarily and unexpectedly wrong, so why should this state be any different? I say spend the time you would have spent implementing this flag correctly on ensuring that the data doesn't get corrupted in the first place!
May
16
comment locking a resource via lock within try. Is it wrong?
@supercat: Well, yes, but that kinda begs the question. If the data structure is intact enough to know that it ought to be throwing "I'm corrupt" exceptions instead of deadlocking then the data structure is probably intact enough to simply fix itself up into a consistent state. The problem with corrupt data structures is that they don't know that they're corrupt. (Insert the "Sixth Sense" joke of your choice here.)
May
16
comment locking a resource via lock within try. Is it wrong?
And one other comment: the smart thing to do in a reliable system is to be pessimistic. An unhandled exception means that something is unexpectedly wrong, and it could be anything. Without evidence that things are good, in that scenario you should be pessimistic and assume that everything is wrong until proven otherwise. Hoping for the best and muddling on can make things a lot worse. Of course, it depends on the nature of the program. If the compiler gets in a bad state and crashes, no big deal. If the database controller gets in a bad state and loses data, that's a big deal.
May
16
comment locking a resource via lock within try. Is it wrong?
Moreover: given that reading alone caused an exception, does this seem like a good candidate for immediately releasing the lock and letting another thread wake up and crash too? This sounds like a recipe for crashing every worker thread in the process. Exceptions are supposed to be exceptional, not expected control flow. I expect code inside locks to be the most relible code in the system; that stuff shouldn't ever be throwing exceptions.
May
16
comment locking a resource via lock within try. Is it wrong?
@supercat: I certainly take your point, which could be summed up as "throwing out of a read lock does not corrupt anything". Sure. But let's look at the bigger picture here. The presumed scenario then is reading something protected by a critical section caused an exception. Does that sound like a good situation to be in? Exactly what is being done in this critical section that reading alone causes an exception??? This sounds like a bug that needs to be fixed, not a mainline scenario.
May
16
comment Is it a good idea to use lambda expression instead of delegates?
I don't really understand the question; it's a bit like asking "which is a better pet, a dog or a mammal?" Well, a dog is a mammal, so that's not really a choice. Lambda expressions are used because they are convertible to delegates, so asking which is better doesn't really present a choice; if you're using lambdas, you're already using delegates. Can you ask the question such that there's a clear choice?
May
16
comment C# overload methods behavior with interface
If these sorts of topics interest you, you might want to check out my blog this week. I'm running a series on how interfaces and optional argument declarations work in C#.
May
16
comment Description of return type
Actually you can use the "Cast By Example" trick to read an instance of anonymous type if the object is being read in the same assembly as it was created, and avoid reflection or dynamic. However, if you're doing this inside the same assembly, then why not just make an internal nominal type?