311,768 reputation
776821531
bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
visits member for 5 years, 6 months
seen 9 hours ago

Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Apr
18
comment Returning the middle n (values not index) from a colleciton
@Ani: Good point. Maybe "bizarre" is too strong. But it certainly would be helpful to know what the purpose of the code is, and what the expected distribution is. If the goal is to discard the lowest and highest scores in the figure skating finals, I really don't care. If the outliers being removed have to do with a manufacturing process, or human-life-safety impacting decision, or are a part of some financial calculation, then that's more serious. Failure to correctly manage outlier statistics has destroyed companies.
Apr
18
comment Returning the middle n (values not index) from a colleciton
This does not strike me as anything even close to a statistically valid approach to removing outliers. What is your a priori statistical model? Is it normally distributed? If so, then how does this technique take into account the three sigma rule? This whole thing strikes me as completely dodgy. Why is "11" an outlier here? If you graphed this data it would not appear to lie outside of any particular model that comes to mind. Can you give us more details about what you're trying to do here, and why? This just seems really bizarre.
Apr
18
comment Cannot step into a method returning IEnumerable<T>?
The yield is the point at which the call to MoveNext returns. If there is no call to MoveNext then the breakpoint inside it obviously will not be hit.
Apr
18
comment Cannot step into a method returning IEnumerable<T>?
@Ciel: I'll post some links to articles explaining why it works this way.
Apr
17
comment What is “mumble typing?”
@Lasse: Indeed, that works, but it is a bit irksome having to create an array and then copy it to a list. And there are arbitrarily many generic data structures of the form Foo<T>, and only a small number of ToFoo extension methods that take an array. The problem of having a type that is partially stated by the developer and partially deduced by the compiler is much more general than the specific example I gave.
Apr
17
comment What is “mumble typing?”
@Paul: Lasse is correct. A subtle design principle of C# is that when we need to determine a "best" type from a set of types, we always pick one of those types. We never say "we have Giraffe and Tiger, therefore Mammal is best" because Mammal wasn't a choice. In your first case we'd pick double, and in the second case we'd give an error.
Apr
17
comment Simple multiplication
Nice use of the "goes to operator". :-) blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/04/01/…
Apr
16
comment What's the practical difference between a variable being mutable vs non-mutable
And of course not all variables have names. Only fields and locals have names. What is the name of myArray[10], or *myPointer?
Apr
16
comment How to switch on enum that has repeated values or boolean values, in C#?
Why is the formal parameter "sn" but the switch controller is "s"? Is that a typo, or are you intending them to be different?
Apr
16
comment How Do Generic Methods Know About Inaccessible Types? (Or “How I Lost a Dollar”)
You would be wrong. The "is" and "as" operators have their own IL instruction that does a type check. They do not rely on reflection. See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/16/…
Apr
16
comment Problem calling extension method on a ViewPage
stackoverflow.com/questions/3510964/…
Apr
16
comment All possible C# array initialization syntaxes
@Joren: Thanks, that was a typo.
Apr
15
comment C# Bug in Threading.Task.Parallel.For?
I assure you that there is a bug in the library. It's just that this isn't it.
Apr
15
comment C# Bug in Threading.Task.Parallel.For?
Your problem is well-known; it is called the select isn't broken problem. (pragprog.com/the-pragmatic-programmer/extracts/tips) That is, the incorrect belief that when you cause a bug in your own program, that the "real" bug must actually be an obvious bug that somehow managed to be released in a well-tested and heavily-debugged library. Sure, sometimes there are bugs in libraries and compilers. I've caused plenty of those. But most of the time, the right starting assumption is that your code is the thing that is wrong.
Apr
15
comment Why doesn't a+++++b work in C?
Nice. Many languages have similar bizarre corner cases thanks to greedy lexing. Here's a really weird one where making the expression longer makes it better: In VBScript x = 10&987&&654&&321 is illegal, but bizarrely enough x = 10&987&&654&&&321 is legal.
Apr
15
comment Why a Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder.RuntimeBinderException if the invoked method is there?
Same thing here. When I run your code (having provided suitable definitions of Account, Money, etc) I get no exception. Can you provide a small program that actually compiles, runs, and demonstrates the problem?
Apr
15
comment All possible C# array initialization syntaxes
@BoltClock: The first syntax you mention is an "implicitly typed array creation expression". The second is an "anonymous object creation expression". You do not list the other two similar syntaxes; they are "object initializer" and "collection initializer".
Apr
15
comment self mutating readonly struct field
If the subject of "unusual situations where boxing of mutable value types is or is not avoided" interests you, see my recent article on the subject: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/03/14/…
Apr
15
comment self mutating readonly struct field
@TakeMeAsAGuest: If the value type overrides ToString then no, a call to ToString does not box. Since value types are all sealed, the compiler knows the exact method that a call to an overridden ToString on a value type will resolve to, so there is no need to go through the vtable indirection in the boxed struct. We therefore skip the boxing and call directly. If you look up the semantics of the "constrained" prefix to the "callvirt" instruction you'll see how it works.
Apr
15
comment Abstract classes vs Static classes in C#
@Joan: No. A post-secondary educational instutite that is primarily about teaching job skills (as opposed to doing research and granting degrees, like a university) is a "community college" here. Tuition is usually pretty reasonable. For example, at Bellevue College a course that is one hour a week for three months is about $90-$200 depending on the level of the course.