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bio website ericlippert.com
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visits member for 5 years, 8 months
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Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Apr
6
comment Is it OK doing a return from inside using block
Is there some reason why you're keeping the text of the warning a secret from us? We don't have psychic powers; if you want a diagnosis of the error message post the message.
Apr
6
comment Checking for IEnumerable<T> with reflection
@Adam: Looking at your code, I don't understand why you feel that you need to use reflection. What is wrong with "(c.SourceProp.Value is IEnumerable<Subject>) && (c.TargetProp.Value is IEnumerable<SubjectViewModel>)" ???
Apr
6
comment Checking for IEnumerable<T> with reflection
@Adam: Then what is the question? Is the question "If I have some Type object t how would I check to see if t implements IEnumerable<string>?" Or is the question "If I have some type object t then how would I check if t is IEnumerable<string>?" Or is the question "If I have some type object t then how would I check if T is convertible to IEnumerable<string??" or "... is equal to IEnumerable<T> for any T?" or... Those are all different questions. You'll get the answer you want when you ask the question you actually are interested in .
Apr
5
comment CLS-compliant alternative for ulong property
Your comment that "not all usages of ulong properties have the same semantics, so a single struct would not cut it" seems to hold a possible solution. If, say, offsets and addresses have different semantics then why not make an Offset and and Address struct that are wrappers around a ulong, that enforce whatever semantics you want? You can even have overloaded operators, so that an Address + Address is illegal, but Address + Offset makes a new Address.
Apr
5
comment CLS-compliant alternative for ulong property
Do you anticipate having a lot of users of this library who are using languages that require strict CLS compliance? How many customers do you have who will be using the library from a language that doesn't have support for ulong?
Apr
5
comment C# GetHashCode question
Good point. More generally, equality should be an equivalence relation. That is, it should be reflexive (x equals x is always true), symmetric (x equals y is the same as y equals x) and transitive (if x equals y and y equals z then x equals z). Note that in C# equality across types is not an equivalence relation; two strings compared as strings may give a different result when compared as objects. And in a few cases equality is not an equivalence relation within a type (Double.NaN != Double.NaN, for instance.) But it is best to strive to make equality an equivalence relation.
Apr
5
comment Implicit conversion of collections
To add to the answer: for covariance (or contravariance) to work in C# 4.0 there must be a representation-preserving conversion between the two types. If you want some piece of code to be run on every element in the collection to convert it, you're going to have to write that code. The compiler doesn't know how to write it for you.
Apr
4
comment Object Inheritance, Sealed Method Overrides, and C#
In other words: don't spend too much effort trying to prevent the derived class author from shooting themselves in the foot. Rather, provide them with a compelling, useful base class and teach them how to use it effectively, and then trust them to do so.
Apr
4
comment Object Inheritance, Sealed Method Overrides, and C#
One of the fundamental ideas of OO programming is that the dev writing the derived class knows more about the problem domain than the dev writing the base class. The dev writing Newspaper knows more about newspapers than the dev who wrote Publication, who knows more than the dev who wrote Object. And furthermore, since the consumer of the base class is the one who chooses to re-use the functionality of the base class, presumably they know what it is and how to use it safely. It sounds to me like you have more of a user education problem and less of a technical problem.
Apr
4
comment Object Inheritance, Sealed Method Overrides, and C#
The more I read this question the less I understand what the OP wants.
Apr
4
comment Object Inheritance, Sealed Method Overrides, and C#
I am a bit confused by this question. I would ask two clarifying questions. (1) how does the "sealed" method modifier not do exactly what you want? Why are you jumping through all these hoops when you could simply override Go and seal it? and (2) what do you mean "they can still call base.Go" -- who can still call base.Go, and if they do, why do you think it will call A.Go? Surely the base of a class overriding B is B, not A. Can you clarify?
Apr
3
comment Why doesn't the following generic method call require a type?
@Wil: That's the one.
Apr
3
comment Why doesn't the following generic method call require a type?
@Wil: The spec is not that scary. You can download it for free, or if you buy a printed copy it is full of annotations from C# experts on interesting facts about the language. The best practice here is to do whatever you feel is (1) correct -- if type inference gets it wrong then you have to put in the right type, and (2) whatever is easier to read. Sometimes having the type there makes the code more clear, and sometimes it's this ugly thing stuck in the middle of otherwise clean code. I tend towards the side of leaving it out and letting inference do the work.
Apr
3
comment Manipulating very large binary strings in c#
@configurator: A doubly-linked list makes an excellent mutable catenable deque but a lousy immutable catenable deque because there is no way to build the data structure in such a way that it is persistent. That is, you can't re-use parts of an immutable doubly-linked list to make another one, the way you can with a singly-linked list.
Apr
2
comment Check if a string can be made by chars of another string in C#
What if the string had doubles? Suppose the string is "bookkeeper" -- would "book" be a legal input, because there are two o's in the string?
Apr
1
comment Calling a list of methods in a random sequence?
Note that this algorithm is O(n^2) as the number of elements in the list grows. It's fine for short lists, but as soon as they get big, this is not an efficient way to shuffle.
Apr
1
comment Calling a list of methods in a random sequence?
What mysterious force prevents the same key being randomly chosen twice?
Apr
1
comment Calling a list of methods in a random sequence?
What mysterious force prevents the same key being chosen randomly twice?
Mar
31
comment String to float vs double conversion
@Uwe: See my series on floating point arithmetic if you want the basics and some fun facts about Benford's Law. blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/tags/…
Mar
31
comment String to float vs double conversion
@Uwe: The number certainly does contain decimal places. Remember how a float is stored. A float is a binary number 1.0101010101010 multiplied by 2^x for some integer x. A float is a sign bit, an integer representing the exponent, and the digits after the "1."