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seen Nov 20 '12 at 18:09

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accepted C++ Object Instantiation vs Assignment
Aug
7
comment C++ Object Instantiation vs Assignment
Ah, copy elision and mistaking initialization for assignment is what tripped me up. The anonymous TestClass() is an rvalue. Because it has no name and is destined for destruction anyway the compiler just skips the copy and uses it directly. The behavior I expected can be had from TestClass t; t = TestClass(); which does indeed do two constructions and an assignment.
Aug
7
comment C++ Object Instantiation vs Assignment
Would TestClass t(0) and TestClass t = TestClass(0) be any different?
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awarded  Yearling
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asked C++ Object Instantiation vs Assignment
Apr
20
answered Equivalent code for instance method synchronization in Java
Apr
20
awarded  Commentator
Apr
20
comment In Java critical sections, what should I synchronize on?
Another difference is that the synchronized flag on the method can be seen via reflection by other code. The presence of a synchronized block within a method cannot be detected without examining its bytecode. This may not seem important, and usually isn't, but an AOP framework might be able to omit a redundant lock if it could see that a method is already synchronized, for example.
Apr
20
comment In Java critical sections, what should I synchronize on?
The most obvious difference is that a synchronized(this) block compiles to bytecode that is longer than a synchronized method. When you write a synchronized method, the compiler just puts a flag on the method and the JVM acquires the lock when it sees the flag. When you use a synchronized(this) block the compiler generates bytecode similar to a try-finally block that acquires and releases the lock and inlines it into your method.
Mar
28
comment Question about decorator pattern and the abstract decorator class?
In Java you can dynamically handle method calls for an interface with a Dynamic Proxy. Alternatively, or when you have a class rather than an interface, cglib's Enhancer can generate implementation classes at runtime that delegate calls to a handler you provide.
Mar
28
revised Question about decorator pattern and the abstract decorator class?
add comment about interface changes
Mar
28
answered Question about decorator pattern and the abstract decorator class?