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seen Jan 25 '12 at 1:06

Dec
12
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
Okay, looked into Data.Vector implementation -- foldr' shouldn't be faster than foldl', as foldr' is just foldl' with a flip of the function passed to it. foldl' itself is based on a monadic foldlM construct.
Dec
12
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
@NathanHowell Good to know. I suppose I should set up a more recent environment.
Dec
12
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
@ondra You're RIGHT! In fact, changing it to a foldr' made it another half-second faster (but only in that spot -- changing it elsewhere makes things slower ... very strange).
Dec
12
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
-O2 -fexcess-precision -funbox-strict-fields with GHC 7.0.4. I also tried a datatype conversion at some point, didn't help. And you're right, strict bytestrings saves us another couple fractions of a second. My concern though is still the profile, which shows allocation happening in the inner loop -- I'd like to know what is causing that and how to stop it, if at all possible. I should probably go look at other statistical packages, see how they handle computing joint probabilities quickly.
Dec
12
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
Actually, all those bang patterns seem to help, shave off a half-second (we're actually at around 4s).
Dec
11
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
Excellent suggestion! I actually ended up moving the n == 0 into doMrmr, seemed like a good idea. As for this construction though, without unpacking i or j we can't construct accumEq2 -- which makes me wonder if the dynamically-constructed nature of accumEq2 is the problem.
Dec
11
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
@JohnL Awesome! Thanks for the pointer
Dec
11
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
I've annotated it as NOINLINE so that it would show up on the profile. The timing isn't all that different, shaves off a half-second, maybe. All the time and allocation that was previously spent in mutualInfoInnerLoop now shows up in mutualInfo. And from what I've read, inlining and unboxing are unrelated things, see link
Dec
11
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
Certainly, the Int is 10 and the dataset can be found at github.com/nlhepler/HMrmr/blob/master/test_nci9_s3.csv
Dec
11
comment Strictness optimization and memory allocation in Haskell
Yes, I have. The source is also annotated with {-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-} and {-# OPTIONS_GHC -O2 -fexcess-precision -funbox-strict-fields #-}