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Software & Hardware Geek


Mar
12
comment log4net vs. Nlog
mono 2.x works fine with log4net.
Mar
9
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
@Blank: Can you please find a source for your alignment claims? The only thing I'm finding that is up to date in intel software architecture is stackoverflow.com/questions/881820/… (I've already answered this on some other thread)
Mar
5
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
@LukeH: You're correct about atomicity not being guaranteed in for anything basically larger than a 128-bits in the Intel architecture, and even 64-bits in case of .NET, as the JIT does not generate cmpxchg16b instructions AFAIK. If someone were to store a struct in the ConcurrentList/SynchronizedList that is beyond 8 bytes, then he/she are basically b0rked. More over that: if, for some-reason, the memory is not aligned to 8 bytes, i.e. (&(_array[x]) & (8-1) != 0) || (&(_array[x][y]) & (8-1) != 0), then even those writes won't be always atomic. I'll update the code to test for this.
Mar
4
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
@Blank: regarding alginment, this is actually a very good point. On modern processors you don't have too many alignment requirements. (I answered this elsewhere: stackoverflow.com/questions/881820/…). The .NET framework seems to ensure (still looking for official info on this) pointer alignment. This means that on x86 you'll get 4 byte alignment and on x64 8 byte alignment, The code in question (the original one by Dan Tao, and my updated version) both require up to pointer size alignment.
Mar
4
revised alignment requirements for atomic x86 instructions
added 192 characters in body
Mar
4
comment alignment requirements for atomic x86 instructions
The text I quotes above IS from the Intel manuals and it clearly states the different alignment requirements per processor family. I should have probably used different wording to express that the UPDATED Intel information is very clear, I guess that what you get for reading a .pdf from 1999.
Mar
4
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
@Blank: regarding volatile/compare-exchange: If you take a look @: github.com/damageboy/ConcurrentList/blob/master/ConcurrentList/… (which is my version of @Dan Tao's code, you will see that I've added comments with the actual x64 assembly created for the use of Interlocked.Increment / Interlocked.CompareExchange, it is clear that MS directly generates cmpxchg and lock xadd instructions that take a memory address. If you read the Intel literature you will see that intel promises these instructions to my synchronous across the memory bus and other CPU caches.
Mar
3
answered InterlockedExchange and memory alignment
Mar
3
answered alignment requirements for atomic x86 instructions
Feb
26
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
I like you implementation a lot. I've made some improvements to it, which I will upload to github so you could also take a look at them as well. most of the changes I've made are around having more logical initial array sizes, e.g. 8,16,32... instead of 1,2,4 (a bit wasteful IMO), and around improving your LOG2 function into something completely horrific that should run in less cycles...
Feb
26
accepted Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
Feb
26
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
BTW: The amino-cbbs version of LockFreeVector<T> is also based on the same paper you referenced: amino-cbbs.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/amino-cbbs/trunk/amino/…
Feb
26
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
I have though about and I have answered this point when Valentin Kuzub raised it in his comment. The only useful scenario is for a .Add() only IList<T>, where Remove/Insert are not applicable/allowed. This can and DOES in fact improve reader performance greatly while still allowing thread-safe append operations.
Feb
26
awarded  Commentator
Feb
26
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
+1 for going ahead and implementing it on your own. I'm also in the process of porting the java version into c#... I read your blog post, and I'm still going to run your tests on my machine, but the main benefit is for multiple reader threads with a single writer/appender thread. That is where you should expect to see a performance boost as the plain dumb "use lock()" solution would still lock for every read...
Feb
24
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
@Dan Tao: You are absolutely correct, if you read my comment below where I replied to Valentin Kuzub you'll see that it perfectly fits into the only use-case where a LockFreeVector<T> still makes sense at all...
Feb
23
accepted Is WinForms ListView in VirtualMode limited to 100,000,000 rows?
Feb
23
revised Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
added 209 characters in body; added 102 characters in body
Feb
23
comment Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
While there are many points where I definitely do agree with you, I can still see a need for a thread-safe IList<T> much like the LockFreeVector<T> that is provided in amino-cbbs... The main use-case, which is coincidentally the one I'm after, is for when you have an append-only modification of a List<T> from one/more thread(s) while a few other threads may need to go over the list in read-only fashion up to the last-known .Count value when they started the enumeration / processing... IOW, I'm looking for read-only performance that is equivalent to an array, while still being able to append
Feb
23
revised Lock free & Thread-Safe IList<T> for .NET
edited title; added 14 characters in body