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You can reach me at frerich(DOT)raabe(AT)googlemail(DOT)com.


Aug
16
comment Template Haskell: reify in GHCi
You can use putStrLn $(stringE . pprint =<< reify ''Bool) to get pretty-printed output.
Aug
1
comment Why would using head/tail instead of pattern matching make evaluation terminate?
+1 this is starting to make some sense, however I suppose you actually meant to write foldr1 interleave [[0..], [1...], ...] = interleave [0...] (foldr1 interleave [[1...], ...]) right?
Aug
1
comment Why would using head/tail instead of pattern matching make evaluation terminate?
@mb14: That's right, I tried to find the smallest difference between the two interleave definitions which still triggers the difference in behaviour.
Aug
1
comment Why would using head/tail instead of pattern matching make evaluation terminate?
@mb14: The interleave _ _ = [] case is the same for either version, I only gave the alternative definition for the other case.
Aug
1
comment Why would using head/tail instead of pattern matching make evaluation terminate?
What do you mean by "it won't be able to figure this out"? The pattern "(x:xs)" matches any non-empty (even infinite) lists and should work just fine since only the first element of the list spine is evaluated, no? I suspect it has to do with the fact that I have a infinite list of infinite lists (which is what map repeat [0..] yields.
Aug
1
comment Why would using head/tail instead of pattern matching make evaluation terminate?
Why does forcing the first item in the spine trigger this problem?
Jul
21
comment Listing All Possible 'Shortest' Paths
Why is H a final node but not G (in your second example, mind you)?
Jul
21
comment Listing All Possible 'Shortest' Paths
Is the starting point always labelled "O"?
Jul
21
comment Listing All Possible 'Shortest' Paths
For the "actual problem", the solution "OG" would also be possible (an alternative to "OH"), right? Given that "H" and "G" are equivalent by your definition.
Jul
21
comment Listing All Possible 'Shortest' Paths
The "actual problem" image isn't shown.
Jul
8
comment Find and print index of element in a list (string)
I'd +1 this if you'd extend your answer to point out that in Python, people commonly "ask for forgiveness, not permission", i.e. you'd rather try to get the index and catch any error than to first check whether the element is contained.
Jul
8
comment Finding Minimum hamming distance of a set of strings in python
You could shorten your code using some itertools goodness; your nested loops can be just for s1, s2 in combinations(trans, 2). The hamdist function could use return sum(islice(1 for ch1, ch2 in izip(str1, str2) if ch1 != ch2), prevMin))
Jul
3
comment weird compiler error using bind2nd(): “member function already defined or declared” instead of “reference to reference”
+1, it appears that this is even an issue if first_argument_type is already a T&? At least I found that std::bind2nd(std::ptr_fun(f), "xyz"); fails to compile with the exact same error if f is void f(std::ostream &str, const char *s);. Alas, passing std::ostream by value is not an option, so it seems you have to resort passing a pointer to it. :-/
Jul
2
comment Find out max & min of two number without using If else?
@Jongware even if you use random values of x and y on each iteration, i.e. you make sure that branch prediction doesn't kick in?
Jul
2
comment What if we change the number of hops of slow and fast pointer while finding the loop in a linked list
Note that your pseudo-code is an endless loop because it always starts from head, and it never handles the case that a given list is not a loop (there are no end-of-list checks).
Jul
1
comment How to interpret condition with comparing result of binary operator?
is bob.prop set to 0x100? would be bob.prop == 0x100.
Jun
24
comment What is the best way to create a function with a single argument from a function with multiple arguments?
@user3208430: I just extended my answer with some benchmarks, which don't seem to match @jonrsharpe's results of functools.partial being 20-25% faster...
Jun
24
comment What is the best way to create a function with a single argument from a function with multiple arguments?
@DSM The sole reason for giving it a name for this little exercise was to call it. In practice, if you want to partially apply a function it's because you're passing the partially applied function to something else, which then provides the remaining arguments. Read: in practice, you don't need a name (in this case it seems the lambda could be passed straight to scipy.integrate.quad).
Jun
24
comment What is the best way to create a function with a single argument from a function with multiple arguments?
@DSM Well lambda expression are just that - expressions. They don't contain statements, like a function does. Unfortunately Python (needlessly) distinguishes lambda expressions and functions.
Jun
24
comment memcpy extremely unexpected behavior
"I thought it was going to work correctly until I tried it and it didn't." -- welcome to the world of software engineering. ;-)