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Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Jan
29
suggested rejected edit on Assertive programming with JavaScript
Dec
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Apr
16
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Feb
23
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
17
awarded  Yearling
Oct
27
revised Why is a C++ Vector called a Vector?
Changed standard name
Oct
10
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
17
awarded  Yearling
Mar
19
comment Should programmers use boolean variables to “document” their code?
But if you follow Kevin's example, it's equivalent to yours. What difference does it make whether the variable can take on 2 values or more than 2?
Feb
23
comment Which is the best data-structure for iterating through arrangements of a string?
Put the for loop in its own function and I'm sold.
Feb
23
comment Can C++'s value_type be extended from iterator_traits to all types?
I had to add specializations for T* and const T*, but it worked, I think. Thanks.
Feb
23
accepted Can C++'s value_type be extended from iterator_traits to all types?
Feb
19
comment Can C++'s value_type be extended from iterator_traits to all types?
I have images with different pixel types, some of which are structs and some of which are floats and some of which are ints. To do something mathematical with them (e.g. find the mean value) requires telling the compiler what type to use for the computation. And I already have VALUE_TYPE defined to return iterator_traits<T>::value_type, so it's best to combine them into one construct.
Feb
19
comment Can C++'s value_type be extended from iterator_traits to all types?
But since float::value_type does not exist, it will fail to compile for the key case of POD types.
Feb
18
asked Can C++'s value_type be extended from iterator_traits to all types?
Dec
29
comment Is there anything wrong with this shuffling algorithm?
@Kriss: I think a simpler answer is the following: if RAND_MAX were 4 and i were 3, then 0 and 1 would be output 40% of the time, while 2 would be output 20% of the time. As the numbers get larger, the gap narrows but never gets to zero.