11,361 reputation
42558
bio website andrewcheong.com
location San Diego, CA
age 26
visits member for 3 years
seen 1 hour ago

Severely influenced by GEB, N. N. Taleb, Thinking, Fast and Slow, and Dostoevsky.


Sep
14
comment Casting specialized base pointer to derived pointer that specializes on additional template parameter (“adding on” a specialization)
I'll close this question but not delete it in case anyone ever comes around wanting to do the same thing. Solution: inspect your code more closely and see if you're trying to make something generic that isn't meant to be / ever will be generic.
Sep
14
comment Casting specialized base pointer to derived pointer that specializes on additional template parameter (“adding on” a specialization)
@ajclinto - Nope, you were right. I figured it out. I had the same hunch but didn't see it before. I thought my utility function designed to print elements of Container had to be generic, which is why I thought I didn't know what A would be. But after tracing through code I realized that this utility function only gets a chance to be called on Containers of a specific type A, so even though it felt wrong before, it's actually correct to hardcode the one type A that it will print. Logic works! Closing this question.
Sep
14
comment Casting specialized base pointer to derived pointer that specializes on additional template parameter (“adding on” a specialization)
That's what I keep thinking, but it's weird, I see no way to know A in my set up. Let me look at it again and perhaps edit in a tiny bit more to show why.
Sep
14
revised Casting specialized base pointer to derived pointer that specializes on additional template parameter (“adding on” a specialization)
edited title
Sep
14
asked Casting specialized base pointer to derived pointer that specializes on additional template parameter (“adding on” a specialization)
Sep
14
reviewed Approve suggested edit on No. of processors / core on the board
Sep
14
comment No. of processors / core on the board
You should ask on SuperUser or Unix.SE.
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
Actually, could you clear something up for me? I'm trying to think of a concrete example. Initially, I understood what you were saying as, Container<int> and Container<double> can implement different interfaces, meaning different methods—and if that were true, I see completely why a non-specialized member (or pointer) is impossible. But how would you implement different methods between the two specializations in the first place? Can you actually implement something like void Container<int>::doSomethingSpecificallyForIntegers() {}? If so, then I see your point.
Sep
14
accepted Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
Ah! Okay. Your edit, "Specializations of the same template usually share a (mostly) common interface, but they could just as well be completely different," made me realize the impossibility.
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
I guess I'm asking if there already exists a common base by the fact that template specializations are clearly related to the template class itself. I was wondering if there's a way to refer to such an "implied" base rather than creating an empty base class, which seems somewhat superfluous.
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
@Potatoswatter - Woops, thanks for the edit.
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
I precisely don't want to specify <foo> and instead allow my struct to store any specialization.
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
"Barring the missing template argument." But that's exactly what I'm talking about.
Sep
14
comment Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
Also, is there name for such an empty base class, existing solely for this reason?
Sep
14
asked Is the only way to “polymorphically” declare a member of a non-specialized template type, by defining a base class?
Sep
13
awarded  Strunk & White
Sep
13
revised C/C++: When would anyone use a union? Is it basically a remnant from the C only days?
Fixed code formatting within bulleted list.
Sep
13
comment C/C++: When would anyone use a union? Is it basically a remnant from the C only days?
This is an excellent answer and deserves more upvotes.
Sep
13
answered Vertical badge deviates from edge with increasing text length