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Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
12
awarded  Announcer
Feb
15
awarded  Tumbleweed
Oct
14
accepted How to make my Haskell program faster? Comparison with C
Sep
3
awarded  Yearling
Mar
18
comment Why is not the last column of my matrix printed?
Thanks for the quick reply. Yours and rra's answer are basically the same, but I have accepted his answer, for no other reason than that I simply read it first :/
Mar
18
accepted Why is not the last column of my matrix printed?
Mar
17
revised Why is not the last column of my matrix printed?
edited title
Mar
17
asked Why is not the last column of my matrix printed?
Feb
4
accepted Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
Jan
30
comment Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
Thank you for your answer, however since Sjoerd's was first to suggest the use of transposed matrices, I'll accept his answer.
Jan
29
comment Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
@Josh Thank you for showing interest in my problem :) and sorry if I wasn't clear. GF(2) is just another way of saying "do every operation modulo 2", so e.g. addition = XOR and mult. = AND, thus in your example A * B would in fact be [[0,0],[0,0]]. The wikipedia link explains it well. And - yes: you are right that we won't use "ordinary" multiplication, but use the logical AND instead (since they are equivalent). However, my question goes somewhat beyond this. See the link in the OP for an example of how we can exploit that we work with boolean matrices.
Jan
29
comment Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
@Josh No the matrices are not (necessarily) sparse, but you can assume they are always invertible (if that is of any help). The expected result is a new k x k boolean matrix yes. I.e. I want a completely normal matrix multiplication of two boolean matrices (i.e. the elements are in GF(2)). Part of the question is finding a good representation of these matrices, enabling efficient computation, so I haven't put any criteria on the types you chose. Neither do I care if you chose column-major or row-major ordering. Do what's easiest for you, I can always extract out the essential ideas anyway :)
Jan
29
comment Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
@sheu Do you think you could please expand a bit on your answer? How exactly should the 16x16 representation of a 9x9 (say) matrix look like? And what should the signature of this function be? Should the padding be the responsibility of the caller or the function itself?
Jan
29
revised Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
edited tags
Jan
29
comment Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
@Oli Yes - the matrices consists only of binary values, so for all operations you can just use bit operations.
Jan
29
comment Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
@Dvorak It was just to not limit any answers. If you have a very clever way of doing this, but it requires 64-bit, please just use that :)
Jan
29
asked Fast multiplication of k x k boolean matrices, where 8 <= k <= 16
Jan
11
comment Is there a more efficient way of expanding a char to an uint64_t?
Thanks for the suggestion. However, I must admit that I'm simply not experienced nor knowledgeable enough about these things to test this out. Nor do I know exactly which kind of platform this code will run on.
Jan
11
accepted Is there a more efficient way of expanding a char to an uint64_t?