Aristotle Pagaltzis
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Nov
3
comment How do I recover/resynchronise after someone pushes a rebase or a reset to a published branch?
Ah, so it does. But though I now understand what it says, I would not have before, prior to figuring this out on my own. And there is no cookbook recipe (perhaps rightly so in such documentation). I will also put forth that calling the “hard case” hard is F.U.D. I submit that rewritten history is trivially manageable at the scale of most in-house development. The superstitious way in which this subject is always treated annoys me.
Nov
3
comment How do you revert a faulty git merge commit
Getting back in synch is really not that complicated. Since I have never seen a recipe elsewhere, though, I wrote one up and posted it here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4084868
Oct
19
comment What is the best way to check the strength of a password?
I didn’t know whether to downvote this for being a bad answer or to upvote it for being a funny one, so I’m leaving a comment instead.
Oct
11
comment Perl - Push into arrays using variable references versus using variable copies
That’s because he made the trivial mistake of leaving out the $ sigil on $sth. I fixed it.
Oct
10
comment Perl - Push into arrays using variable references versus using variable copies
I am writing this as a comment because it is not an answer to your question, but it still has to be said: Copy-pasting the same line 6 times is a bad idea. Use a loop. And do yourself a favour and watch this talk: video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4037440245833870135
Oct
5
comment vim regex replace multiple consecutive spaces with only one space
I just prefer the reduced finger acrobatics of zs over typing @<=… in much the same way (if to a lesser extent) that I enjoy Vim better than E(scape)M(eta)A(lt)C(ontrol)S(hift). :) OTOH, one’s sense of flair is always worth some sacrifice, so feel free.
Oct
5
comment vim regex replace multiple consecutive spaces with only one space
Of course this version is an order of magnitude more finicky to type, and to formulate on the fly – and that’s for almost as trivial a pattern as it gets. You’ll be well served to familiarise yourself with \zs and \ze, they can do wonders for the writability and readability of more complex patterns (particularly when you have reason to use both at once!).
Oct
5
comment How do I go back to an earlier commit of a file using git?
She probably wants git checkout instead, as per @progo’s answer.
Oct
4
comment How can I efficiently count ranges that cover a given range in Perl?
I’ve updated the code again – hopefully for the last time – to account for the problems you found.
Oct
4
comment how to use pythontidy in vim
Ah, that’s even cooler.
Oct
4
comment Transfer only revision history from Google Code to GitHub
I don’t understand what “just the history” is supposed to mean. What else is going to be converted when you convert the repository? Nor do I understand why you point out that you have done work – because, why else would you want to convert it? So I am thinking that either you are trying to ask a question that you are not explaining in a way I (and apparently others, per lack of answers) understand, or you did not understand my answer. What are you trying to do?
Oct
3
comment how to use pythontidy in vim
I’m using 7.2, so it’s brand new. Is it possible to undo the reload, like it is possible to undo a filter operation? If not, that would be another argument against this solution. A third one is that it requires a named file, which can be inconvenient in some situations.
Oct
3
comment how to use pythontidy in vim
Note that you can glob-match file types too, eg. you can write autocmd FileType {xml,xslt,xhtml} to make an auto-command apply to any files detected to contain either XML, XSLT, or XHTML. This is especially useful for file types that can be detected by content rather than file name.
Oct
3
comment how to use pythontidy in vim
E149: Sorry, no help for undoreload
Oct
2
comment how to use pythontidy in vim
Reloading the file will lose all of your undo tree. This is not a good solution.
Sep
24
comment How can I efficiently count ranges that cover a given range in Perl?
Ah yes. The wrap-around case needed to be ($start .. $max_length, 0 .. $end) of course. Fixed the answer.
Sep
24
comment How can I efficiently count ranges that cover a given range in Perl?
I’ve switched it to a pack/unpack-based implementation (which was trivial – check the revision log). Devel::Size says that brings it down to about half a gigabyte for $max_length = 10_000_000, assuming that every single point is covered by two ranges.
Sep
24
comment How can I efficiently count ranges that cover a given range in Perl?
Also – the $end >= $start bit implements wrap-around ranges.
Sep
24
comment How can I efficiently count ranges that cover a given range in Perl?
Then worst case would be 10 million sub-arrays, which at 110 byte each should be just about 1GB. An empty 10-million-element array comes in at just 40MB. Add overhead for the contents of the sub-arrays… you’ll probably break the 32-bit memory limit but at least on a 64-bit machine you’re easily OK. :-) Esp. if most points are only covered by a few ranges. And you need correspondingly fewer sub-arrays if large parts of your space are not covered by any range.
Sep
24
comment How can I efficiently count ranges that cover a given range in Perl?
The question was how to do better than the most naïve possible algorithm, not how to write it (which would amount to a “do my coding for me” request given that it’s a straight transliteration from prose to code).