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Oct
20
comment How safe is it to assume time_t is in seconds?
Are you aware of a real system on which time_t (defined originally in Unix of course) has a unit of other than seconds? I'm not. It's compatible everywhere, and for obvious reasons. If you don't either, I don't see the value to having that discussion. You might as well caution people not to use printf() because some fictitious system defines it as a synonym for abort().
Oct
19
comment How safe is it to assume time_t is in seconds?
This isn't correct. As Giulio points out below POSIX defines time() (and thus its return type) as returning seconds since the epoch. Obviously it would be possible to have a non-POSIX system with a typedef of the same name interpreted differently, but I don't think that's what the question was about (and no such systems exist anyway).
Oct
13
awarded  Good Answer
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Sep
3
answered Is it possible to generate native x86 code for ring0 in gcc?
Aug
23
comment List parameters to a function from binary executable
There's no requirement that the arguments to a function be placed on the stack with a PUSH instruction. And of course on ABIs other than standard i386 C functions the arguments may be passed in registers. In fact it can be impossible in some cases even to tell how many arguments were passed. There is no way to do this in the general case; your best bet is to trap the calls and log the arguments at runtime.
Aug
12
comment Why is unsigned integer overflow defined behavior but signed integer overflow isn't?
Touche on saturation, but AFAIK none of those modes are compliant with ISO C either. You use the saturating instructions via assembly or intrinsics. Is there a system out there which represents a ISO C signed char/short/int/long variable with saturation?
Aug
12
comment Why is unsigned integer overflow defined behavior but signed integer overflow isn't?
The important note here, though, is that there remain no architectures in the modern world using anything other than 2's complement signed arithmetic. That the language standards still allow for implementation on e.g. a PDP-1 is a pure historical artifact.
Aug
6
comment Do git tags apply to all branches?
Greg's answer is all you need. Tags are single commits without context, and they live in a repository-wide namespace. You don't talk about a given tag being "on" a branch any more than you talk about Linux 3.11 being "on" any branch (obviously it will exist in any branch of the kernel!).
Aug
5
answered How to run SPECfp benchmarks on verilog module?
Aug
2
comment What happens if an object resizes its own container?
You can virtually always write into "freed" memory without crashing. That's the way memory mapping works. The map stays in place for use by future objects. You can never write into freed memory "without problem", however. It's just that the "problems" are things other than crashing.
Aug
2
answered What happens if an object resizes its own container?
Aug
1
revised simplify a regex to reduce recursion
deleted 1 characters in body
Aug
1
answered simplify a regex to reduce recursion
Jul
31
comment efficient way to copy array with mask in c++
Add your performance requirements to the question while you're at it. This doesn't sound like an operation a sane application would be limited by...
Jul
31
comment Strange Compilation Behavior
Metanitpic: signed and unsigned division by a constant 2 are shift operations that differ only by a sign extension bit. :) But yes: general division is indeed a different machine instruction for unsigned logic.