7,399 reputation
1320
bio website
location
age
visits member for 6 years, 3 months
seen Nov 24 at 18:19

Jul
31
answered Strange Compilation Behavior
Jul
17
comment fine granularity nanosleep not power efficient in c++ program on linux
Please specify your hardware and which kernel version you are running. Power state management is deep voodoo, and highly hardware-dependent.
Jul
17
comment Using cin for input complex number in C++11
Which makes the "works successfully in gcc 4.7.2" a little suspect. I suspect the poster just meant "works without visible error" and didn't validate the complex value produced.
Jul
16
comment Any way to get the mnemonics from the machine code?
user2258778's answer below is a little cleaner. The objdump tool supports a "binary" format for disassembling raw data. No need to use objcopy to generate an ELF file.
Jul
15
comment How to include BEGIN section in a perl script
Or alternatively think about using some sort of package management solution (CPAN, or the OS's package manager) to drop your libraries into the interpreter's default locations in a robust and maintainable way.
Jul
10
comment C: forking new process fails
Arrgh... was just typing my answer when you beat me to it. This is correct. "hi" does not print because the child process crashes trying to assign to k[0].
Jul
3
answered DHCP and IP address acquired event
Jul
1
answered Store/load atomicity on ARM Cortex-A9 MPCore
Jul
1
comment Is there efficient way to deal cards other then this if statement?
What kind of computer are you using where formatting and printing 52 lines of output is an "efficiency" concern. But as MrB points out below, extracting the suit and value from the number with modulus and integer division would be "cleaner".
Jun
28
answered Odd gcc warning behavior
Jun
27
comment How do I atomically create a locked file in Linux?
You're right, atomically creating and locking a file would fix your problem. But that's not the way fcntl locks work, sorry. If you want to use a fcntl lock, the file your are locking has to exist before any synchronization action is taken by your program. Find a way to move the creation outside that if() in your pseudocode, or else work up another synchronization protocol that doesn't use the download file as the mutex.
Jun
27
answered How do I atomically create a locked file in Linux?
Jun
25
comment pthread - How to provide heap synchronization mechanisms when multiple threads share the same heap?
kingsmasher1: once again you seem to be asking about generic synchronization techniques and not e.g. the threadsafety of malloc().
Jun
25
comment pthread - How to provide heap synchronization mechanisms when multiple threads share the same heap?
This is too general a question for stackoverflow. You're basically asking how synchronization primitives work in pthreads, which is far too large to answer as a single "question". Check documentation on the pthread_mutex_* and pthread_cond_* functions in whatever tutorial Google gives you, then come back with the specific questions you have.
Jun
21
comment function static variable destructor and thread
dauphic: it looks correct to me: set the atomic flag, push a record to ensure at least one wakeup after the flag is set, and then wait for the inevitable thread exit.
Jun
21
comment function static variable destructor and thread
I don't see anything wrong with the code as-is. One possibility is that you have found a bug in VC11's handling of thread spawning in static initializers, which seems like an edge case that might be buggy. Another is that you have a bug in ConcurrentQueue, which you don't show.
Jun
8
comment size_t vs int in C++ and/or C
That's actually correct. The segment/offset really wasn't a "pointer" in the C sense as you couldn't do arithmetic on it naturally (though compilers were pretty good about hiding this with generated code in "huge" mode). The biggest single thing you could address via offsets was indeed 65536 bytes.
Jun
5
answered Sending events to uinput with python-evdev on keybinding trouble with mask keys
Jun
4
comment Capture file system system calls on Linux platform
I missed that bit. If you want to trace at the kernel level, you'll want to look at things like Systemtap and LTTNG. Those are vastly more powerful, but quite a bit more involved than something like strace. Basically you're writing little code bits to run inline in the kernel when it hits specific events, and making good use of the tools requires that you have a reasonable familiarity with how the kernel is organized.
Jun
4
answered Capture file system system calls on Linux platform