1,108 reputation
21436
bio website
location New Jersey
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 7 hours ago

I enjoy playing with technology and programming. Hope I can help you.


Feb
23
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
For that you just wake up the selector and poll from a concurrent queue of events. Again no need for threads!
Feb
21
comment What are the advantages of using an ORM?
Hibernate creates more problems than it solves. "Let's solve the SQL and relational-to-object problem!" GREAT! And to do that let's introduce a million of other complexities. No way. ORM like Hibernate is a huge TIME SINK, unless you never heard about databases, SQL, JDBC, etc. Not saying you should handle the boring JDBC boiler plate, but there are many solutions to address this much simpler problem: iBatis, jOOQ and MentaBean. If you like to be as close as possible to SQL you should check MentaBean: mentabean.soliveirajr.com
Feb
17
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
By doing a selector.select(timeout) you do NOT need a thread in the other end. Having a thread defeats the purpose of using NIO in the first place.
Feb
16
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
This code has too much value to be open-sourced... :)
Feb
16
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
I agree, but a framework and/or a nice solution to handle all that wouldn't be a bad idea.
Feb
16
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
There are much more complications: you only send heartbeat IF and only IF you haven't sent anything for X seconds... you may have multiples timers, not just one, etc. It looks like there is NO framework or standard solution in Java to do that. I wonder why... :)
Feb
16
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
selector.select(timeout) is much better. I am looking for a simple solution/framework to do that.
Feb
16
comment NIO Reactor Pattern: Receiving asynchronous callbacks inside the selector loop every N miliseconds
That sucks because you are using a thread (timer) to trigger the timeout. If you have 5 different timeouts for all sorts of things you need 5 different timers. To call select with a timeout is much better so I am looking for a simple and straightforward solution/framework to do that.
Feb
7
comment Java linked list that supports fast removal of any nodes?
That looks like the best option so far. Or course the only drawback is that it does NOT support duplicates in the list.
Feb
7
comment Java linked list that supports fast removal of any nodes?
@BrianKnoblauch: Check NOTE2
Feb
7
comment Java linked list that supports fast removal of any nodes?
Added a note. I do NOT want to remove while iterating.
Jan
25
comment Java GCs overhead: Does it matter if you have 10mb or 10gb of *referenced* objects?
Zing JVM looks cool. Any rough idea how much does it cost?
Jan
19
comment Maven + SLF4J: Version conflict when using two different dependencies that require two different SLF4J versions
Something is misunderstood here: BoneCP is bound (needs) 1.5. It is bound to the API and NOT to the implementation which you are trying to exclude above. I need to INCLUDE an extra implementation for BoneCP. I cannot SWITCH the API version used by BoneCP. Check the mvn dependency try edited in the question.
Jan
19
comment Maven + SLF4J: Version conflict when using two different dependencies that require two different SLF4J versions
Error added. I believe I DO have to add an implementation of SLF4J. So the problem is: Hibernate requires 1.6 implementation. BoneCP requires 1.5. That's the clash!
Nov
11
comment Non-blocking socket writes in Java versus blocking socket writes
@EJP It 'makes sense' to be deceived that you should register OP_WRITE whenever you want to write, agree?
Nov
11
comment Non-blocking socket writes in Java versus blocking socket writes
@EJP: A common solution: only register OP_WRITE when you get a full buffer, so you can wait for room. While you don't get a full buffer just write at will whenever you like it, in other words whenever you read something. Agree? :)
Nov
11
comment Non-blocking socket writes in Java versus blocking socket writes
@EJP Very true and thank you very much. You can rely on the write operation to detect a partial write on a full underlying buffer. I got confused with the isWritable(). If isWritable() returns false the key was selected on some other operation besides OP_WRITE and you should refrain from writing on that iteration. You can decide to queue or drop. Most of the time you will be reading and writing on the same selector, so if you did not read anything you do not have to write anything, it does not matter the state of the buffer and you probably did not get selected anyways.
Nov
11
comment Non-blocking socket writes in Java versus blocking socket writes
If there was room when OP_WRITE was triggered you will have room when isWritable() returns true later inside your loop. Unless there is another thread writing which makes very little sense. It is hard for me to imagine a situation where blocking writes are preferable. Of course you can always come up with one, but non-blocking writes gives you the option to decide what to do: wait (block), queue packets, drop packets or kill client. That's much better!!!
Nov
11
comment Non-blocking socket writes in Java versus blocking socket writes
@EJP: So the loop Peter described cannot happen, because the key will not be selected with a full buffer. If you call isWritable() and it returns true you are good to write, otherwise you have to queue or drop, you decide.
Nov
10
comment Non-blocking socket writes in Java versus blocking socket writes
@EJP: When the underlying write socket buffer is FULL and you have the OP_WRITE registered, does the selector select the writable key even thought isWritable() will return false, putting yourself in a loop like Peter was saying? Or is it smart enough just to select the key when space in the buffer becomes available?