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May
1
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
7
comment Boost::Spirit pushing to a single vector
Thanks, that was it; I just got rid of data and used std::vector<dp>() instead, which makes it look cleaner in my opinion. I was looking forever through spirit's documentation but never saw this issue in it. If you want to post the answer I mark it as accepted.
Nov
7
revised Boost::Spirit pushing to a single vector
added 3 characters in body
Nov
7
revised Boost::Spirit pushing to a single vector
edited tags
Nov
7
awarded  Editor
Nov
7
revised Boost::Spirit pushing to a single vector
added missing tag
Nov
7
asked Boost::Spirit pushing to a single vector
Mar
19
comment Boost::Variant - “no matching function for call”
When I woke up this morning I knew what the problem was right of the bat. This was just one of those times I was working way too many hours and started made a really stupid mistake. I just wish it wasn't on such a easy problem because I knew better.
Mar
19
accepted Boost::Variant - “no matching function for call”
Mar
19
asked Boost::Variant - “no matching function for call”
Jan
12
accepted licensing for commercial to gpl
Jan
12
comment licensing for commercial to gpl
When you look in the source, you can see where other people from other companies, and countries, have contributed to it, so that could very well be the case. I was kind of worried that asking them might cause some waves due to the politics between them and us, but it looks likes it's the only way to find out.
Jan
9
comment licensing for commercial to gpl
They have no licensing info included with their product and I couldn't find anything on their website. If this was a private company I won't even be thinking about this, but since it's the government there's a slim chance that it might be open since it's funded by tax payers.
Jan
9
comment licensing for commercial to gpl
BTW, NIST has no problem with the source being recompiled and linked to your code; that's why they included their fortran source code. Their software only comes with a windows 32 dll so you have to recompile it anyway if you want it for another OS. The only reason I wanted to release the wrapper was because I saw other engineers that was looking for a way to use the library on linux.
Jan
9
comment licensing for commercial to gpl
Yes, that's what I felt also. NIST has no problem with their source being recompiled and linked against another program, but they probably would have a problem if the source was included with that. It's not that I want to release the derived work; I just want to release the wrapper I wrote... but then you could argue that IS the derived work. The only reason I was wanted to include their source was so that the wrapper could link to it. I might just have to release the wrapper and have the user include their own sources, though that would be a pain, it's probably the only way this can be done.
Jan
9
asked licensing for commercial to gpl
Oct
8
comment How to get translation to work outside the class?
Yep, that fixed it! Linguist puts all the translations under QObject now, instead of splitting them up by classes like before, but that's not really an important issue and I'm more then happy with this solution.
Oct
8
awarded  Scholar
Oct
8
accepted How to get translation to work outside the class?
Oct
7
awarded  Student