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Sep
8
comment When is a function too long?
@PedroMorteRolo I definitely agree on this one. Furthermore, large classes are likely to have more mutable-state: which leads to code that is very difficult to maintain.
Sep
5
comment When is a function too long?
@PedroMorteRolo Exactly. The standard API isn't always a model of elegance. Furthermore, much of the Java API was developed with an intimate knowledge of the Java Compiler and JVM, hence you have performance considerations that may explain it. I concede that critical sections of code that can not waste a single millisecond may have to break some of these rules, but that should always be considered a special-case. Spending extra development time up-front is an initial investment that can avoid future (potentially crippling) tech-debt.
Aug
23
accepted Idiomatic Scala: Semantic difference between <Collection>Like and <Collection> Types?
Jul
10
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
22
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Jun
11
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May
30
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May
29
asked Idiomatic Scala: Semantic difference between <Collection>Like and <Collection> Types?
May
29
comment “Least Astonishment” in Python: The Mutable Default Argument
I would argue that this is a language design flaw for one very simple reason: A function definition should be internally state-less between invocations. I say "internally stateless", because state can externally be changed if data is passed by reference or as a side-effect of calling other state-changing methods. But with all external state removed, subsequent calls of a function should not effect the future behavior of said function. Violating this becomes a liability that undermines code modularization (in-terms of both separation of concerns and functional programming).
May
15
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May
4
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Apr
25
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
18
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
I actually had to throw this project on the back-burner (was working on other stuff) but now I am looking into it again and I'm leaning more towards a "Bin" algorithm, and I may even factor in angle and distance after all ... more to follow :-)
Apr
6
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
I'm actually dealing with an utterly massive set of data so n is pretty darn high (think OpenStreetMap data ;-)). But, you make a good point on the angle being more meaningful within short distances. Since I am using also segmenting space via a constant-time bucketing scheme, your idea of incorporating angles may actually prove very helpful within these buckets. It's looking like the kd-tree is a strong candidate for solving this.
Apr
5
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
The k-d tree is sounding like a great approach. As for connecting the segments, I honestly think that just doing a direct edge might actually be sufficient for my situation (since gaps in the data is a very strong indicator that accuracy is less important). It turns out that I am already subdividing my surface region using a constant-time bucketing scheme, so I have the option of confining k-trees into a single bucket (or a span of buckets). This would create an upper bound on the size of these k-d trees. I will look into it and report back later.
Apr
5
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
This is actually quite similar to one of my earlier ideas but there are really two problems with this: 1.) you are still left with the problem of computing the distance between each pair of segments 2.) The angle between the line segments doesn't correlate to whether the line segments should be connected or not
Apr
5
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
The curve is fixed and the segments are at specific locations (in other words: the curve and line segments are already pre-defined). What I am trying to do is to determine what order these segments are in along the curve.
Apr
5
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
I would hope that I can do better than O(n^2)
Apr
4
comment Sorting Geographical non-contiguous line segments along an implied curve
Imagine a Hiking trail: and you basically have it. Very tight bends are not likely to be apart of the curve and assume that sharp corners don't exist at all.
Apr
4
comment Regressive n log(n) sorting
@doomster I have just posted the original problem that lead to this ... stackoverflow.com/questions/15823517/…