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Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Jun
10
awarded  Good Question
Apr
13
awarded  Caucus
Mar
4
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
30
comment How to add our created session encryption algorithm to (major) browser using OpenSSL
Do you mean you want this algorithm merged into the OpenSSL project itself? Or is this a hypothetical question, of how one would go about getting a ciphersuite added to the TLS spec? Or do you simply want to understand how one would go about adding a cipher to the OpenSSL code base (without the intent having it merged upstream)?
Oct
10
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
1
awarded  Yearling
Apr
26
comment Is this encryption method secure?
The value of the purpose parameter is completely arbitrary, as long as it's consistent within whatever context you're using it in. I'm curious: what, exactly, led you to believe that your approach would ensure the integrity the ciphertext?
Apr
26
comment Is this encryption method secure?
At first glance, your "integrity" check is completely broken (it only at all protects the integrity of the first six bytes of each block AFAICT, and even then only very weakly). Either use an authenticated cipher mode (e.g., GCM, EAX, CCFB) or derive a second key (that's what the "purpose" parameter is for; allowing you to produce multiple keys for different purposes from the same inputs) and use it to compute an HMAC over the ciphertext and IV.
Mar
31
comment Utilizing PBKDF2 with OpenSSL library
Your language of choice almost certainly has a library that already implements PBKDF2. This is (IMHO) extremely preferable to shelling out to the openssl command line or trying to talk directly to the (horrifyingly bad) libssl API directly.
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
22
comment Copying an array in a designated initializer
The array to copy bytes from contains dynamic data.
Nov
22
comment Copying an array in a designated initializer
Thanks. I was hoping there was some magic by which I could do it, but if not, memcpy it is.
Nov
22
revised Copying an array in a designated initializer
added 83 characters in body
Nov
22
comment Copying an array in a designated initializer
@Kninnug Yes, I'll update the example to reflect that.
Nov
22
asked Copying an array in a designated initializer
Nov
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
9
comment I'm using MD5 to hash passwords. When should I jump to the next thing? SHA-3?
@NullUserException "I have yet to see a practical attack against MD5-hashed passwords." There is a practical attack, and an obvious example is the Linkedin password database being mostly cracked (that was SHA-1, but the exact same principle applies). Your statement will be used by people to justify staying on MD5 passwords as "good enough", which is in my opinion highly irresponsible.
Oct
9
comment I'm using MD5 to hash passwords. When should I jump to the next thing? SHA-3?
@NullUserException The issue with MD5 as a password hash isn't collisions. It's speed. With GPU clusters, attackers can calculate billions of hashes per second. This, combined with very sophisticated password heuristics allow attackers to typically reveal all 8-character or fewer passwords in a database, plus any "structured" longer passwords (e.g., my!l1ttL3,PoNy.)