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Efficient Joins with Ballerina Query Expressions

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Query expressions in Ballerina allow you to write queries for data processing using SQL-like syntax. With this language-integrated query feature, Ballerina offers you more quality in querying your data much faster and more accurately. You can read my previous article to get started with query expressions in Ballerina.

In this article, I’ll be taking you a step further and walking you through joins in query expressions in Ballerina.

`join` Clause

join clause is one of the intermediate clauses which form the query pipeline in query expression. It is used to perform either inner equijoin or left outer equijoin. The language specification for using the join clause is as follows.

join-clause := [outer] join typed-binding-pattern in expression join-on-condition
join-on-condition := on expression equals expression

The behavior of join clause is similar to from clause which is used to iterate any iterable value. It takes two source iterables as inputs. The elements in each source must contain a property that can be compared to a property in the other source. A comparison of each value in a specific iteration is carried out to identify the matching items based on the condition defined using join-on-condition. The iteration is skipped for the non-matching items, which dissatisfies the on condition.

The equals keyword emphasizes that the outer source iterable is consumed by the left key and the inner source iterable is consumed by the right key. Therefore left side of the equals has only the outer source in its scope and the right side of the equals only has the inner source in its scope. The result of the query expression with join depends on the type of join you are performing, whether it’s an inner or a left outer equijoin. The join clause is implemented as a hash join which makes it more efficient in the data retrieval.

You can try out the examples in this article using the latest version of Ballerina, 2201.1.0 (Swan Lake Update 1)

Inner Equijoin

An inner equijoin only returns values from joined data sources where a certain condition of equality is met.

Consider the following query to get the first name, last name, and department name of all people with department information.

import ballerina/io;

type Person record {|
    readonly int id;
    string fname;
    string lname;
    int deptId;
|};

type Department record {|
    int id;
    string name;
|};

type DeptPerson record {|
    string fname;
    string lname;
    string? dept;
|};

public function main() {
    Person p1 = {id: 1, fname: "Melina", lname: "Kodel", deptId: 1};
    Person p2 = {id: 2, fname: "Tobi", lname: "Biden", deptId: 2};
    Person p3 = {id: 3, fname: "Emily", lname: "Blunt", deptId: 3};
    Person p4 = {id: 4, fname: "Tom", lname: "Riddle", deptId: 1};

    Department d1 = {id: 1, name: "HR"};
    Department d2 = {id: 2, name: "Operations"};

    Person[] personList = [p1, p2, p3, p4];
    Department[] deptList = [d1, d2];

    DeptPerson[] deptPersonList = from var person in personList
        join Department dept in deptList
                                on person.deptId equals dept.id
        order by dept.id
        select {
            fname: person.fname,
            lname: person.lname,
            dept: dept.name
        };

    io:println(deptPersonList);
}

The above query expression uses join clause to match each Person value with Department using department id. If a Person value has no matching Department, that Person value will not appear in the result set. The query constructs a list of DeptPerson type members. The output of the above query is,

[{"fname":"Melina","lname":"Kodel","dept":"HR"},{"fname":"Tom","lname":"Riddle","dept":"HR"},{"fname":"Tobi","lname":"Biden","dept":"Operations"}]

Left Outer Equijoin

The left outer equijoin returns all elements from the left data source and matched elements from the right data source where a certain condition of equality is met. The right side element would produce a null if left side element has no matches. To perform left outer equijoin you need to add outer keyword to your join clause.

Consider the following example where you want to get names of all people and their department name if exists.

DeptPerson[] deptPersonList = from var person in personList
    outer join var dept in deptList
    on person.deptId equals dept.id
    order by dept.name
    select {
        fname: person.fname,
        lname: person.lname,
        dept: dept.name
    };

According to the above query expression each Person value is joined with Department based on the department id and each element in personList is included in the result even if there are no matches in the deptList. When Department is empty for any Person a null value is produced. Therefore the result of the above query expression is,

[{"fname":"Melina","lname":"Kodel","dept":"HR"},{"fname":"Tom","lname":"Riddle","dept":"HR"},{"fname":"Tobi","lname":"Biden","dept":"Operations"},{"fname":"Emily","lname":"Blunt","dept":null}]

Join usage with streams and tables

Similar to lists, join can be used with streams, and tables as well.

♦ ️Get details about people in each department and order them by department name when the iterable in join clause is a stream.

stream<DeptPerson> deptPersonStream = stream from var person in personList.toStream()
    join Department dept in deptList.toStream() 
    on person.deptId equals dept.id
    order by dept.name
    select {
        fname: person.fname,
        lname: person.lname,
        dept: dept.name
    };

record {|DeptPerson value;|}? value = deptPersonStream.next();
while (value is record {|DeptPerson value;|}) {
    io:println(value);
    value = deptPersonStream.next();
}

{"value":{"fname":"Melina","lname":"Kodel","dept":"HR"}}
{"value":{"fname":"Tom","lname":"Riddle","dept":"HR"}}
{"value":{"fname":"Tobi","lname":"Biden","dept":"Operations"}}

♦ Get details about people in each department and order them by department name when the iterable in join clause is a table.

type PersonTable table<Person> key(id);

PersonTable|error personTable = table key(id) from var person in 
                                     (stream from var p in personList select p) 
    join Department dept in (table key() from var dp in deptList select dp) 
    on person.deptId equals dept.id
    order by dept.name
    select person;

if (personTable is PersonTable) {
    var itr = personTable.iterator();
    record {| Person value; |}? value = itr.next();
    while (value is record {| Person value; |}) {
        io:println(value);
        value = itr.next();
    }
}

{"value":{"id":1,"fname":"Melina","lname":"Kodel","deptId":1}}
{"value":{"id":4,"fname":"Tom","lname":"Riddle","deptId":1}}
{"value":{"id":2,"fname":"Tobi","lname":"Biden","deptId":2}}

Multiple joins

Any number of joins can be used in your query expression to perform multiple joins where each join clause matches up the result of the previous join clause to produce the final result.

Let’s take a look at the following example where you want to get the department name and the manager name for each person. In order to get the department name to which a person belongs, we need to join each person with the department. That result can be joined with manager details to get the manager name of each department.

import ballerina/io;

type Person record {|
    readonly int id;
    string fname;
    string lname;
    int deptId;
|};

type Department record {|
    int id;
    string name;
|};

type Manager record {|
    int managerId;
    string managerName;
    int deptId;
|};

public function main() {
    Person p1 = {id: 1, fname: "Melina", lname: "Kodel", deptId: 1};
    Person p2 = {id: 2, fname: "Tobi", lname: "Biden", deptId: 2};
    Person p3 = {id: 3, fname: "Emily", lname: "Blunt", deptId: 3};
    Person p4 = {id: 4, fname: "Tom", lname: "Riddle", deptId: 1};

    Department d1 = {id: 1, name: "HR"};
    Department d2 = {id: 2, name: "Operations"};

    Manager m1 = {managerId: 1, managerName: "James", deptId: 1};
    Manager m2 = {managerId: 2, managerName: "Mike", deptId: 3};
    Manager m3 = {managerId: 3, managerName: "Emma", deptId: 2};
    Manager m4 = {managerId: 5, managerName: "John", deptId: 4};

    Person[] personList = [p1, p2, p3, p4];
    Department[] deptList = [d1, d2];
    Manager[] managerList = [m1, m2, m3, m4];

    var personManagerList = from var person in personList
        join Department dept in deptList
        on person.deptId equals dept.id
        join Manager mgr in managerList
        on dept.id equals mgr.deptId
        order by person.id
        select {
            name: person.fname,
            dept: dept.name,
            manager: mgr.managerName
        };

    io:println(personManagerList);
}

The first join clause matches Person values with Department based on the department id and produces a list of all people having department details. The second join clause matches Manager values with their Department based on the department id so that a list of all people having department details with their manager details are produced. The output of the above query expression is,

[{“name”:”Melina”,”dept”:”HR”,”manager”:”James”},{“name”:”Tobi”,”dept”:”Operations”,”manager”:”Emma”},{“name”:”Tom”,”dept”:”HR”,”manager”:”James”}

Nested Query Expressions with Joins

Similar to SQL, a nested query expression or an inner query expression is a query expression within another query expression. An inner query expression can be embedded within a join clause where its resultant value set can be utilized in the outer query expression.

The following example shows where a query expression embedded in the join clause outputs a list containing the first two managers and it is used to get the details of all people having matching manager details.

var personManagerList = from var person in personList 
    join Manager mgr in (from var m in managerList limit 2 select m) 
    on person.deptId equals mgr.deptId
    order by person.id
    select {
        name: person.fname,
        manager: mgr.managerName
    };

The output of the above query expression is,

[{"name":"Melina","manager":"James"},{"name":"Emily","manager":"Mike"},{"name":"Tom","manager":"James"}]

Hope you got an understanding about working with joins in Ballerina query expressions! Don’t forget to go through the Ballerina website if you want to find out about more exciting features. 😇

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