Print

Rob Flickenger

Director of Engineering, Spiral Genetics

Seattle, WA, United States
github.com/hackerfriendly
Last seen on Stack Overflow today

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Non-preferred technologies

Experience (6)

Director of Engineering

Spiral Genetics

Dec 2017 → Current (1 year, 11 months)

Spiral Genetics makes software to compare large populations of whole human genomes — ultimately, to compare genomes at scale and to power novel discoveries that lead to new diagnostics and drug discovery. We work with governments, pharmaceutical companies, and large academic research institutions that want to compare and mine large whole genome datasets.

As Director of Engineering, I keep our incredibly talented dev team focused on the ongoing development of BioGraph and our population scale analysis tools.

Technical Lead, Secondary Analysis

Fabric Genomics

Jan 2017 → Nov 2017 (11 months)

When Spiral Genetics was acquired by Fabric Genomics (formerly Omicia) in 2017, I became the technical lead for the Secondary Analysis division.

I implemented and maintained the Secondary Analysis framework that enabled customer uploads of genetic data to the cloud for processing. The results were then automatically imported into Fabric's tertiary analysis tool.

Sr. Software Engineer

Spiral Genetics

Sep 2013 → Dec 2016 (3 years, 4 months)

Originally hired as Test Automation Lead, I implemented an automated unit and functional test framework. I was later promoted to Sr. Software Engineer, and my primary role was to implement production code in C++ and python.

The early days of Spiral concentrated on creating high performance DNA analysis pipelines in the cloud.

Sr. Software Engineer

F5 Networks

Jul 2010 → Aug 2013 (3 years, 2 months)

As a Sr. Software Engineer for F5’s iHealth team, I designed and implemented tools and automation to support the iHealth service. This position demanded expertise with Unix system administration, TCP/IP networking, F5 product knowledge, and web application troubleshooting for a critical public-facing web service.

I also designed and implemented a back-end processing and data mining system for a moderately large (~30T) customer database. The system included datacenter synchronization, data extraction, validation, storage, and a self-service reporting framework. It was largely based on perl and MySQL.

I was later promoted to F5's Performance Test Team, where I developed test automation and reporting code in Perl and C#. The test framework allowed users to reserve equipment, select a suite of tests, configure devices and switch fabric, and report the results. F5 equipment is quite complex (multiple 10Gbps+ interfaces, multiple blades, virtualized environments, esoteric networking protocols), and the tests needed to be flexible, specific, and resilient.

Testing automation and reporting significantly reduced the manual effort needed to set up and run tests, allowing test engineers to focus on improving the product.

Lecturer & Network Engineer

International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy

Feb 2004 → Jun 2010 (6 years, 5 months)

The ICTP is a UN-sponsored institute that holds regular technical training sessions for the benefit of students from the developing world. I lectured and organized lab activities there for six years. In that time, we undertook a number of long distance Wi-Fi projects to prove the viability of the technology for bootstrapping network initiatives in places where the Internet does not yet reach.

I lectured about Linux, TCP/IP, network security, antenna construction, and long distance radio communications. I also developed training materials. Each class included about 40 students from Africa, Asia, South America, and the Pacific Rim.

In 2008 our team designed and installed a long distance wireless network in Malawi, linking a hospital in Mangochi to the College of Medicine in Blantyre, over a distance of about 200 km. I was responsible for the network design and worked on the physical installation in Malawi.

The greatest challenge in Malawi was logistics. The distances covered were significant, which meant coordinating a team of people to have equipment, food, and transportation ready in two simultaneous remote sites. Once the radio equipment was in place, it needed to be aligned and configured, and our team had to be off the towers by sunset. The network was ultimately used for malaria research. It was a thrilling and thoroughly satisfying project.

From 2008-2010 I also helped design and implement a hybrid mesh and WiMax sensor network in Venice that monitors the flow of seawater in and out of the lagoon, and provides a 20 km full-duplex link to an observation platform on the open sea.

My work at the ICTP is largely documented in the book, Wireless Networking in the Developing World. I was the editor and primary author of the first two editions of WNDW, a free book about using wireless technology to extend the reach of the Internet. It has been been downloaded millions of times, and has been translated into seven languages.

Writer, Editor, and Sysadmin

O'Reilly Media

2000 → 2004 (5 years)

Working for O'Reilly Media was a significant event in my life. O'Reilly in 2000 was a nexus of the Open Source movement. Tim O'Reilly was (and still is) an outspoken proponent of open source software and the free exchange of ideas. I was proud to be hired on as a Systems Administrator around Y2K, and later begin my technical writing career.

From 2000-2002 I served as the sole systems administrator for O’Reilly’s Online Publishing Group. I designed and maintained a Linux cluster that ran the O'Reilly Network family of sites, including oreillynet.com, xml.com, and perl.com.

As my experience grew, I wrote about it. I was a regular contributor to the O'Reilly Network, where I published many popular articles (including one about building a Wi-Fi antenna out of a Pringles can). When I left O'Reilly in 2004, that was the most popular article ever published on the O'Reilly Network. The Pringles cantenna became so ubiquitous it was even featured in its own XKCD comic.

I went on to write Linux Server Hacks, one of the first Hacks books ever published. I also wrote Wireless Hacks and Building Wireless Community Networks. All three titles have been updated with second editions and were translated into many languages.

I also edited and contributed to Network Security Hacks.

View more experience

Open Source

ACTG

Sep 2014 → Current (5 years, 1 month)

Nucleotide syntax highlighting for Sublime Text.

inficon

Jun 2016 → Jun 2016 (1 month)

Python implementation of the Inficon CC3 vacuum gauge protocol

wav2tiff

Jun 2015 → Jun 2015 (1 month)

Convert slow-scan WAV files to TIFF images for scanning electron microscopy.

Stack Exchange

Community Name
Reputation

Public Artifacts (9)

DIY FEG electron emitter

Dec 2016

I successfully manufactured an FEG emitter: an atomically sharp tungsten point electron source for my scanning electron microscope.

I repaired a vintage FEG-SEM

May 2015

I recently got Milly the big SEM online. She had a ton off issues that I’ll chronicle in future posts. But rather than dwell on her past, let’s see what she can do. Remember that 2…

DIY Backyard Genius

Aug 2012

The Tesla Gun was chosen to be the opening project of the 2012 Popular Mechanics DIY Backyard Genius awards!

The Tesla Gun

May 2012

The year was 1889. The War of the Currents was well underway. At stake: the future of electrical power distribution on planet Earth. With the financial backing of George Westinghouse, Tesla’s…

Wireless Networking in the Developing World

Jan 2006

In terms of mind share, Wireless Networking in the Developing World was by far my most successful book project. I served as the editor and primary author for the first two English editions, and organized several translations. For many, it became the "wireless bible" that helped jumpstart wireless Internet initiatives around the world.

WNDW has been downloaded over two million times, and was translated into seven languages.

Wireless Hacks: 100 Industrial-Strength Tips & Tools

Sep 2003

Wireless Hacks was a great follow-up to Building Wireless Community Networks. While BWCN was more of a campaign to get people to open and extend their wireless networks, Wireless Hacks was a chance to document all kinds of fun and emerging wireless shenanigans.

Building Wireless Community Networks

Nov 2001

My first book, from back when Wi-Fi was still pronounced "802.11b".

Around Y2K, it was obvious that wireless was going to utterly change the way that people access the net. BWCN was an attempt to get people to organize and extend the Internet using this emerging technology.

Little did I know that the real audience for this idea wouldn't be in the USA (where cable Internet was about to become dirt cheap) but in much of the rest of the world, where long-haul wireless is often the only option.

View more public artifacts

Tools

First computer TI-99/4A
Favorite editor Sublime (cli: joe)

Rob Flickenger

Technical Skills

Likes: linux c++ python ssh git bioinformatics
Dislikes: java xslt c# asp.net svn

Experience

Dec 2017 → Current Director of Engineering Spiral Genetics
c++11, python, amazon-ec2, azure, bazel, bioinformatics, jenkins, kibana

Spiral Genetics makes software to compare large populations of whole human genomes — ultimately, to compare genomes at scale and to power novel discoveries that lead to new diagnostics and drug discovery. We work with governments, pharmaceutical companies, and large academic research institutions that want to compare and mine large whole genome datasets.

As Director of Engineering, I keep our incredibly talented dev team focused on the ongoing development of BioGraph and our population scale analysis tools.

Jan 2017 → Nov 2017 Technical Lead, Secondary Analysis Fabric Genomics
linux, amazon-ec2, python, c++

When Spiral Genetics was acquired by Fabric Genomics (formerly Omicia) in 2017, I became the technical lead for the Secondary Analysis division.

I implemented and maintained the Secondary Analysis framework that enabled customer uploads of genetic data to the cloud for processing. The results were then automatically imported into Fabric's tertiary analysis tool.

Sep 2013 → Dec 2016 Sr. Software Engineer Spiral Genetics
linux, amazon-ec2, python, c++, jenkins, tup, bioinformatics, git, tableau, jira-agile, gcc, azure

Originally hired as Test Automation Lead, I implemented an automated unit and functional test framework. I was later promoted to Sr. Software Engineer, and my primary role was to implement production code in C++ and python.

The early days of Spiral concentrated on creating high performance DNA analysis pipelines in the cloud.

Jul 2010 → Aug 2013 Sr. Software Engineer F5 Networks
perl, c#, tcp, mysql, sql-server, f5, linux, lua, xslt

As a Sr. Software Engineer for F5’s iHealth team, I designed and implemented tools and automation to support the iHealth service. This position demanded expertise with Unix system administration, TCP/IP networking, F5 product knowledge, and web application troubleshooting for a critical public-facing web service.

I also designed and implemented a back-end processing and data mining system for a moderately large (~30T) customer database. The system included datacenter synchronization, data extraction, validation, storage, and a self-service reporting framework. It was largely based on perl and MySQL.

I was later promoted to F5's Performance Test Team, where I developed test automation and reporting code in Perl and C#. The test framework allowed users to reserve equipment, select a suite of tests, configure devices and switch fabric, and report the results. F5 equipment is quite complex (multiple 10Gbps+ interfaces, multiple blades, virtualized environments, esoteric networking protocols), and the tests needed to be flexible, specific, and resilient.

Testing automation and reporting significantly reduced the manual effort needed to set up and run tests, allowing test engineers to focus on improving the product.

Feb 2004 → Jun 2010 Lecturer & Network Engineer International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy
wifi, linux, tcp, security

The ICTP is a UN-sponsored institute that holds regular technical training sessions for the benefit of students from the developing world. I lectured and organized lab activities there for six years. In that time, we undertook a number of long distance Wi-Fi projects to prove the viability of the technology for bootstrapping network initiatives in places where the Internet does not yet reach.

I lectured about Linux, TCP/IP, network security, antenna construction, and long distance radio communications. I also developed training materials. Each class included about 40 students from Africa, Asia, South America, and the Pacific Rim.

In 2008 our team designed and installed a long distance wireless network in Malawi, linking a hospital in Mangochi to the College of Medicine in Blantyre, over a distance of about 200 km. I was responsible for the network design and worked on the physical installation in Malawi.

The greatest challenge in Malawi was logistics. The distances covered were significant, which meant coordinating a team of people to have equipment, food, and transportation ready in two simultaneous remote sites. Once the radio equipment was in place, it needed to be aligned and configured, and our team had to be off the towers by sunset. The network was ultimately used for malaria research. It was a thrilling and thoroughly satisfying project.

From 2008-2010 I also helped design and implement a hybrid mesh and WiMax sensor network in Venice that monitors the flow of seawater in and out of the lagoon, and provides a 20 km full-duplex link to an observation platform on the open sea.

My work at the ICTP is largely documented in the book, Wireless Networking in the Developing World. I was the editor and primary author of the first two editions of WNDW, a free book about using wireless technology to extend the reach of the Internet. It has been been downloaded millions of times, and has been translated into seven languages.

2000 → 2004 Writer, Editor, and Sysadmin O'Reilly Media
linux, apache, mysql, perl

Working for O'Reilly Media was a significant event in my life. O'Reilly in 2000 was a nexus of the Open Source movement. Tim O'Reilly was (and still is) an outspoken proponent of open source software and the free exchange of ideas. I was proud to be hired on as a Systems Administrator around Y2K, and later begin my technical writing career.

From 2000-2002 I served as the sole systems administrator for O’Reilly’s Online Publishing Group. I designed and maintained a Linux cluster that ran the O'Reilly Network family of sites, including oreillynet.com, xml.com, and perl.com.

As my experience grew, I wrote about it. I was a regular contributor to the O'Reilly Network, where I published many popular articles (including one about building a Wi-Fi antenna out of a Pringles can). When I left O'Reilly in 2004, that was the most popular article ever published on the O'Reilly Network. The Pringles cantenna became so ubiquitous it was even featured in its own XKCD comic.

I went on to write Linux Server Hacks, one of the first Hacks books ever published. I also wrote Wireless Hacks and Building Wireless Community Networks. All three titles have been updated with second editions and were translated into many languages.

I also edited and contributed to Network Security Hacks.

Projects & Interests

Sep 2014 → Current ACTG https://github.com/hackerfriendly/ACTG
python

Nucleotide syntax highlighting for Sublime Text.

Jun 2016 → Jun 2016 inficon https://github.com/hackerfriendly/inficon
python

Python implementation of the Inficon CC3 vacuum gauge protocol

Jun 2015 → Jun 2015 wav2tiff https://github.com/hackerfriendly/wav2tiff
python

Convert slow-scan WAV files to TIFF images for scanning electron microscopy.

Public Artifacts

Dec 2016 DIY FEG electron emitter https://hackerfriendly.com/new-year-new-emitter/

I successfully manufactured an FEG emitter: an atomically sharp tungsten point electron source for my scanning electron microscope.

Jul 2016 My whole genome: open sourced https://hackerfriendly.com/my-genome-let-me-show-you-it/

tl;dr: download Rob’s source code

May 2015 I repaired a vintage FEG-SEM http://hackerfriendly.com/big-sem-online/

I recently got Milly the big SEM online. She had a ton off issues that I’ll chronicle in future posts. But rather than dwell on her past, let’s see what she can do. Remember that 2…

Aug 2012 DIY Backyard Genius http://hackerfriendly.com/diy-backyard-genius/

The Tesla Gun was chosen to be the opening project of the 2012 Popular Mechanics DIY Backyard Genius awards!

May 2012 The Tesla Gun http://hackerfriendly.com/the-tesla-gun/

The year was 1889. The War of the Currents was well underway. At stake: the future of electrical power distribution on planet Earth. With the financial backing of George Westinghouse, Tesla’s…

Jan 2006 Wireless Networking in the Developing World http://wndw.net/
wi-fi

In terms of mind share, Wireless Networking in the Developing World was by far my most successful book project. I served as the editor and primary author for the first two English editions, and organized several translations. For many, it became the "wireless bible" that helped jumpstart wireless Internet initiatives around the world.

WNDW has been downloaded over two million times, and was translated into seven languages.

Sep 2003 Wireless Hacks: 100 Industrial-Strength Tips & Tools http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596005597.do

Wireless Hacks was a great follow-up to Building Wireless Community Networks. While BWCN was more of a campaign to get people to open and extend their wireless networks, Wireless Hacks was a chance to document all kinds of fun and emerging wireless shenanigans.

Jun 2003 Linux Server Hacks: 100 Industrial-Strength Tips and Tools http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596004613.do

Linux Server Hacks was one of the first books published in the popular O'Reilly Hacks series. It is a collection of 100 quick recipes in the style of Unix Power Tools.

Nov 2001 Building Wireless Community Networks http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596002046.do

My first book, from back when Wi-Fi was still pronounced "802.11b".

Around Y2K, it was obvious that wireless was going to utterly change the way that people access the net. BWCN was an attempt to get people to organize and extend the Internet using this emerging technology.

Little did I know that the real audience for this idea wouldn't be in the USA (where cable Internet was about to become dirt cheap) but in much of the rest of the world, where long-haul wireless is often the only option.

Tools

First Computer: TI-99/4A
Favorite Editor: Sublime (cli: joe)