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Jon Ericson

Community Manager at Stack Exchange

Burbank, CA, United States
github.com/jericson
Last seen on Stack Overflow 20 days ago

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Non-preferred technologies
Top Percentiles
Top 5%
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Top 10%
Top 20%

Intro Statement

I'm fascinated by complicated systems: weather and climate patterns, computer systems, communities and, most complicated of all, myself. (Oh, how deep!) My career has been a quest to understand what makes these systems tick. Structured procrastination shapes my work. It's not quite perfectionism and not quite laziness. Think of it more as JIT productivity.

Experience

Community Manager

Stack Exchange

Jul 2013 → Current (6 years, 1 month)

I help the thousands of volunteers who contribute to Stack Exchange sites remain or become productive.

That might mean specing out new feature requests, such as badges for asking good questions over time. I analyze data to understand how the system works. For example, I quantified the first answer advantage. More recently, I've been involved in conducting user research interviews to understand what we ought to be building (before we start building it).

More commonly, it involves navigating social problems. As an example, I articulated our policy that helps people recover from suspensions. Some of my time is spent in chat helping moderators and engaged users in small groups or one-on-one. These are transient and ad hoc conversations where I act something like a mentor.

Finally, we are responsible for helping sites grow. To that end I designed a contest for our Parenting site. The goal wasn't so much to grow a single site in particular, but to experiment with ways to encourage top users to ask more questions. It resulted in network-wide guidance to boost question asking.

I've worked on several major projects, including:

Direct Contributor

Fixate IO

Aug 2016 → Nov 2016 (4 months)

I occasionally wrote freelance blog posts for technology companies who want an independent voice. The plan was to learn about new technology without having to use it. Not sure that ever works.

Technical Lead

JPL/Raytheon

May 2001 → Aug 2013 (12 years, 4 months)

I was part of a team that designed and implemented the Science Investigator-led Processing System to process Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer algorithms. Since launch in the summer of 2004, we received a constant stream of data that needed to be stored on tape, converted into interferograms, spectra, vertical profiles and, finally, global maps for a variety of atmospheric properties. As a result, I managed a high-performance computer system that produced over a terabyte of data each month.

Working closely with our database administrator, I developed new uses for our Oracle database. Together, we created a method called "Distributed Schema" to allow science algorithms designed to work with limited data to operate efficiently on the operational system that contains all mission data without the need to recode.

As the technical lead of TES SIPS, I worked with a small team of operators, testers, system administrators and developers to process live data in near-real time. Meanwhile, we are reprocessed historical data at least 6 times the rate the instrument collected it.

Our team has was given Raytheon's Team Awards (2001, 2006), JPL's Team Bonus Award (2006), Goddard Space Flight Center's Team Award (2005), and NASA's Group Achievement Award (2005). Individually, I received Raytheon's Peer Awards (2005 and 2007), Achievement Awards (2002, 2006), Excellence in Operations and Quality (2008) and a Community Good Citizen Award (2007).

Systems Engineer

JPL/Raytheon

Jun 1998 → Apr 2001 (2 years, 11 months)

During the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, I was part of the ground support team. Both before and after the mission, I helped design and test the software which formatted the radar data to produce 3-dimensional maps of the Earth's surface. During the mission, I monitored communication with the astronauts and waited for downloaded samples of instrument data, which was quickly processed in order to provide images for the press. I was responsible for the demux step. I also designed a simple report to help my colleges anticipate the next downlink slot.

I was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation and our team received NASA's Group Achievement Award in 2001.

Programmer

National Weather Service/Hughes

Jun 1994 → Dec 1997 (3 years, 7 months)

As a summer intern, I was asked to code an algorithm that converted one-minute sensor output into hourly reports of cloud heights and coverage for the Automated Surface Observing System. Over the course of the next three summers I took on algorithm development, design and coding for serial devices, configuration management, weather observation, and database management.

We used ProComm Plus' ASPECT language to script interactions with a wide variety of instruments. I also created a C program to simulate instrument data and a Visual BASIC program to display sunrise and sunset times on arbitrary days and latitudes.

For the Raytheon summer intern essay contest, I wrote a piece speculating on the future of weather observation instrumentation and another (which took the top prize) on ethics in programming.

Education

Atmospherics Sciences

UCLA

Oct 1992 → May 1996

Open Source

se2jekyll.rb

May 2015 → Current (4 years, 3 months) 39 commits / 771 ++ / 122 -- Last commit on May 21, 19

Fetch Stack Exchange posts for publishing on a Jekyll-powered blog.

so-docs-tools

Aug 2017 → Aug 2017 (1 month) 2 commits / 82 ++ / 0 -- Last commit on Aug 16, 17

Collection of scripts to use the data dump from Stack Overflow's dearly departed Documentation feature.

exec_sql.pl

May 2013 → May 2013 (1 month)

Run batch SQL commands from the command line for an database supported by Perl's DBI module.

A Perl replacement for install(1).

Apr 2004 → Apr 2004 (1 month)

An install program is really just a glorified cp(1) command with a few convenience options. If your install program is missing a feature that you need, you're better off writing a program or script that does what you want. An install program should be "All things to all people".

Designer/developer/tester/user.

Top Posts

73

Search for an item in a Lua list

Mar 2009
You could use something like a set from Programming in Lua: function Set (list) local set = {} for _, l in ipairs(list) do set[l] = true end return set end Then you could put your list in the ...
11

Scrum: Resistance is (not) futile [closed]

Aug 2008
Without her input, I started the Scrum practices (daily scrums, burndown charts and other things I've found that worked for me and my previous teams (ala H. Kniberg's cool wall chart). During out ...
52

Why doesn't **find** find anything?

Aug 2008
Try quoting the wildcard: $ find /usr -name \*.sh or: $ find /usr -name '*.sh' If you happen to have a file that matches *.sh in the current working directory, the wildcard will be expanded before ...

Stack Exchange (27)

Public Artifacts (10)

Adios to Unfriendly Badges: Ahoy, Lifejacket and Lifeboat - Stack Overflow Blog

Jun 2019

Sometimes it’s helpful to look back at past decisions and reconsider them in a new light. As part of our ongoing efforts to make Stack Overflow more welcoming and inclusive, we’ve been looking at how our incentive systems, including reputation and badges intended to encourage positive contributions, may be building discouraging barriers instead. In this new light, two badges stood out to us as different from the rest: Tumbleweed and Reversal. In this post, we share the reflection that led to our decision to retire the Tumbleweed and Reversal badges and introduce a pair of more encouraging badges: Lifejacket and Lifeboat.

How Stack Overflow for Teams Fits into the Community - Stack Overflow Blog

May 2018

Back when I was a full-time programmer and there was some code someone struggled with, it was a common practice to ask around in cubicle land. Sometimes you’d get lucky and find someone who know the answer right away or knew where to look in the documentation. When Stack Overflow launched, I cultivated a habit of asking and immediately answering questions I’d heard discussed at the office on the site. To this day, I get upvotes on questions like “How can you untar more than one file at a time?” It doesn’t just add to my reputation score—it also feels great to know I’ve helped dozens¹ of strangers. How often can you say that about an hour or so of effort?

Computer Science and women

Apr 2015

In addition to suggesting some reasons why women are underrepresented in the programming profession, I managed to write a summary of my programming career.

View more public artifacts

Readings

Tools

First computer Tandy 1000 SX
Favorite editor Emacs

Jon Ericson

I'm fascinated by complicated systems: weather and climate patterns, computer systems, communities and, most complicated of all, myself. (Oh, how deep!) My career has been a quest to understand what makes these systems tick. Structured procrastination shapes my work. It's not quite perfectionism and not quite laziness. Think of it more as JIT productivity.

Technical Skills

Likes: perl lua ruby r unix oracle latex bit-o-honey
Dislikes: java c++ candycorn

Experience

Jul 2013 → Current Community Manager Stack Exchange
sql, markdown, statistics, r, ruby

I help the thousands of volunteers who contribute to Stack Exchange sites remain or become productive.

That might mean specing out new feature requests, such as badges for asking good questions over time. I analyze data to understand how the system works. For example, I quantified the first answer advantage. More recently, I've been involved in conducting user research interviews to understand what we ought to be building (before we start building it).

More commonly, it involves navigating social problems. As an example, I articulated our policy that helps people recover from suspensions. Some of my time is spent in chat helping moderators and engaged users in small groups or one-on-one. These are transient and ad hoc conversations where I act something like a mentor.

Finally, we are responsible for helping sites grow. To that end I designed a contest for our Parenting site. The goal wasn't so much to grow a single site in particular, but to experiment with ways to encourage top users to ask more questions. It resulted in network-wide guidance to boost question asking.

I've worked on several major projects, including:

Aug 2016 → Nov 2016 Direct Contributor Fixate IO
automated-tests, devops, pager, saucelabs

I occasionally wrote freelance blog posts for technology companies who want an independent voice. The plan was to learn about new technology without having to use it. Not sure that ever works.

May 2001 → Aug 2013 Technical Lead JPL/Raytheon
perl, c, sql, ksh, oracle, python, linux, solaris

I was part of a team that designed and implemented the Science Investigator-led Processing System to process Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer algorithms. Since launch in the summer of 2004, we received a constant stream of data that needed to be stored on tape, converted into interferograms, spectra, vertical profiles and, finally, global maps for a variety of atmospheric properties. As a result, I managed a high-performance computer system that produced over a terabyte of data each month.

Working closely with our database administrator, I developed new uses for our Oracle database. Together, we created a method called "Distributed Schema" to allow science algorithms designed to work with limited data to operate efficiently on the operational system that contains all mission data without the need to recode.

As the technical lead of TES SIPS, I worked with a small team of operators, testers, system administrators and developers to process live data in near-real time. Meanwhile, we are reprocessed historical data at least 6 times the rate the instrument collected it.

Our team has was given Raytheon's Team Awards (2001, 2006), JPL's Team Bonus Award (2006), Goddard Space Flight Center's Team Award (2005), and NASA's Group Achievement Award (2005). Individually, I received Raytheon's Peer Awards (2005 and 2007), Achievement Awards (2002, 2006), Excellence in Operations and Quality (2008) and a Community Good Citizen Award (2007).

Jun 1998 → Apr 2001 Systems Engineer JPL/Raytheon
fortran, c, irix

During the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, I was part of the ground support team. Both before and after the mission, I helped design and test the software which formatted the radar data to produce 3-dimensional maps of the Earth's surface. During the mission, I monitored communication with the astronauts and waited for downloaded samples of instrument data, which was quickly processed in order to provide images for the press. I was responsible for the demux step. I also designed a simple report to help my colleges anticipate the next downlink slot.

I was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation and our team received NASA's Group Achievement Award in 2001.

Jun 1994 → Dec 1997 Programmer National Weather Service/Hughes
c, serial-port, c++, dos, paradox, scripting

As a summer intern, I was asked to code an algorithm that converted one-minute sensor output into hourly reports of cloud heights and coverage for the Automated Surface Observing System. Over the course of the next three summers I took on algorithm development, design and coding for serial devices, configuration management, weather observation, and database management.

We used ProComm Plus' ASPECT language to script interactions with a wide variety of instruments. I also created a C program to simulate instrument data and a Visual BASIC program to display sunrise and sunset times on arbitrary days and latitudes.

For the Raytheon summer intern essay contest, I wrote a piece speculating on the future of weather observation instrumentation and another (which took the top prize) on ethics in programming.

Education

Oct 1992 → May 1996 Atmospherics Sciences UCLA
fortran, c, solaris

Projects & Interests

Aug 2008 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/1438/jon-ericson
Written 166 answers. Active in ksh, lua, oracle, perl, shell and 8 other tags.
May 2015 → Current se2jekyll.rb https://github.com/jericson/se2jekyll.rb
ruby

Fetch Stack Exchange posts for publishing on a Jekyll-powered blog.

Aug 2017 → Aug 2017 so-docs-tools https://github.com/jericson/so-docs-tools
ruby

Collection of scripts to use the data dump from Stack Overflow's dearly departed Documentation feature.

May 2013 → May 2013 exec_sql.pl https://github.com/jericson/exec_sql.pl
perl

Run batch SQL commands from the command line for an database supported by Perl's DBI module.

Apr 2004 → Apr 2004 A Perl replacement for install(1). http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/J/JE/JERICSON/install/
perl

An install program is really just a glorified cp(1) command with a few convenience options. If your install program is missing a feature that you need, you're better off writing a program or script that does what you want. An install program should be "All things to all people".

Designer/developer/tester/user.

Public Artifacts

Jun 2019 Adios to Unfriendly Badges: Ahoy, Lifejacket and Lifeboat - Stack Overflow Blog https://stackoverflow.blog/2019/06/18/adios-to-unfriendly-badges-ahoy-lifejacket-and-lifeboat/

Sometimes it’s helpful to look back at past decisions and reconsider them in a new light. As part of our ongoing efforts to make Stack Overflow more welcoming and inclusive, we’ve been looking at how our incentive systems, including reputation and badges intended to encourage positive contributions, may be building discouraging barriers instead. In this new light, two badges stood out to us as different from the rest: Tumbleweed and Reversal. In this post, we share the reflection that led to our decision to retire the Tumbleweed and Reversal badges and introduce a pair of more encouraging badges: Lifejacket and Lifeboat.

May 2018 How Stack Overflow for Teams Fits into the Community - Stack Overflow Blog https://stackoverflow.blog/2018/05/23/how-stack-overflow-for-teams-fits-into-the-community/

Back when I was a full-time programmer and there was some code someone struggled with, it was a common practice to ask around in cubicle land. Sometimes you’d get lucky and find someone who know the answer right away or knew where to look in the documentation. When Stack Overflow launched, I cultivated a habit of asking and immediately answering questions I’d heard discussed at the office on the site. To this day, I get upvotes on questions like “How can you untar more than one file at a time?” It doesn’t just add to my reputation score—it also feels great to know I’ve helped dozens¹ of strangers. How often can you say that about an hour or so of effort?

Mar 2018 The Puppet Race: Asking a question and getting comments http://jericson.github.io/2018/03/23/race_to_1k_6.html

In which I describe my experience pretending to be a woman on Stack Overflow.

Jan 2018 Stack Exchange 2017 in Review - Stack Overflow Blog https://stackoverflow.blog/2018/01/31/stack-exchange-2017-review/

“It’s a life’s work to see yourself for what you really are and even then you might be wrong.”—Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men

Aug 2017 The Puppet Race: Documentation was no PED http://jericson.github.io/2017/08/17/race_to_1k_4.html
Jan 2017 Stack Exchange Year in Review: 2016 https://stackoverflow.blog/2017/01/year-in-review-2016/

A look back on the year that was 2016.

Nov 2016 Teach Automated Testing With More Show and Less Tell https://saucelabs.com/blog/teach-automated-testing-with-more-show-and-less-tell-
selenium, automated-tests

Writing automated tests can be daunting. Teaching someone else is even more intimidating.

Jan 2016 Stack Exchange Year in Review 2015 http://stackoverflow.blog/2016/01/year-in-review-2015/

2015 was a banner year for Stack Overflow and the Stack Exchange network.

Oct 2015 The Token Economy of Stack Overflow https://youtu.be/HcUML0XNeKI

How Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange employ principles of behavioral psychology.

Apr 2015 Computer Science and women http://jericson.github.io//2015/04/22/cs_females.html

In addition to suggesting some reasons why women are underrepresented in the programming profession, I managed to write a summary of my programming career.

Readings

Code Complete (Microsoft Programming Series) Steve McConnell http://www.amazon.com/Code-Complete-Microsoft-Programming-Series/dp/1556154844%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D1556154844
C Programming Language (2nd Edition) Brian W. Kernighan, Dennis M. Ritchie http://www.amazon.com/C-Programming-Language-2nd-Edition/dp/0131103628%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0131103628
The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, Anniversary Edition (2nd Edition) Frederick P. Brooks Jr. http://www.amazon.com/The-Mythical-Man-Month-Engineering-Anniversary/dp/0201835959%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0201835959
Higher-Order Perl: Transforming Programs with Programs Mark Jason Dominus http://www.amazon.com/Higher-Order-Perl-Transforming-Programs/dp/1558607013%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D1558607013
On Lisp: Advanced Techniques for Common Lisp Paul Graham http://www.amazon.com/On-Lisp-Advanced-Techniques-Common/dp/0130305529%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0130305529

Tools

First Computer: Tandy 1000 SX
Favorite Editor: Emacs