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Mikael Muszynski

General Manager at Trifork AB

Stockholm, Sweden
github.com/linduxed
Last seen on Stack Overflow over 30 days ago

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Non-preferred technologies

Intro Statement

I'm a back-end developer, a speaker, and an avid learner.

The technical challenges of building systems, large and small, is something that I've found excites me. The wealth of technologies, techniques and practices to learn is energizing and inspiring.

The challenges need not only be technical: during the past years as a full time developer I've gotten to experience companies in varied industries, with teams of different shapes and sizes, having their own cultures and processes. Navigating these environments has taught me the value of listening and the importance of seeing the other party's perspective (be it colleague, department or customer).

My interest for the technical isn't limited to what goes on at work, which is why I'm both hosting, organizing and participating in meetups for programmers, with Haskell Stockholm being the one I put most effort into. Whether I'm presenting, leading or mingling, I find these gatherings to be invigorating.

If given the opportunity, I also enjoy teaching: I mentioned presenting, listening and seeing the other person's perspective; all of these come together when explaining things. The times I've been tasked with mentoring junior employees have been satisfying experiences. Bridging gaps between developers and non-developers is something I've, for similar reasons, enjoyed and have done plenty of times.

I take pride in the quality of my work, but I've come to learn the importance of flexibility; while the highest standard might be the aim, time to market might be the higher priority. What the team jointly decides to be the best way forward is what's important.

Other than the above, when I'm not doing various nerdy things, I do sport climbing on a regular basis, both indoors and outdoors.

Experience (7)

General Manager

Trifork AB

Jul 2017 → Mar 2018 (9 months)

I transitioned from developing to taking over the position of the General Manager of the office, when he left for another company. At the time, we were seven people.

My primary responsibility was managing the day-to-day tasks of the employed.

For the developers, this meant project management, where I made sure that they had as few obstacles outside of programming as possible. This included (but was not limited to) clarifying tasks with project owners, helping the developers to move forward if they were stuck for some reason, and managing the expectations of the clients.

For the community manager (so far responsible for running and promoting the GOTO brand in Stockholm) I had to guide his work toward finding new clients. While we still ran the GOTO meetups from time to time, we also organized events for the local businesses in our city district. Together, we also worked out a sales pipeline for finding clients in various industries, necessitated by us not having the option to hire for a sales department.

The second responsibility was to clean up legacy paperwork issues, going thorough piles of unsorted documents and receipts. While most of the work was done by a part-time assistant, occasional findings forced me to get engaged in administrative projects (sometimes even involving law firm guidance).

My third responsibility was sales, supported by the work of the community manager. This consisted of finding prospects, contacting them and setting up meetings.

The main development projects during my time have been a rewriting a ReactJS frontend, supporting a Clojure+AngularJS platform and developing a React Native app.

Late 2017 we entered a collaboration with a local Erlang consultancy to do sub-contractor work for them, where I did Elixir platform reviews and remote consulting.

Developer

Trifork AB

Mar 2017 → Jun 2017 (4 months)

My primary assignment was the development and maintenance of an Elixir+Phoenix application that runs the various GOTO conference sites. This includes both the user facing pages (such as front page, schedules, payment, etc.) and admin pages (speakers, talks, venues, rooms, schedules, etc.).

I started out by fixing various minor issues that littered the platform, cleaning up things that seemed to have been neglected for a while. Due to the diverse development backgrounds of the people on the team and varying quality of the code, I proposed to my boss that we institute a review process to spread knowledge and move toward more structured work. This was introduced, and I was tasked to help with the adoption of this and other development practices.

While the application more or less a standard Phoenix application, it and the database were running in Docker containers. For the purpose of learning, our boss instructed us to move the architecture to a Kubernetes cluster on Google Cloud Platform.

Apart from my development responsibilities (contributing to the platform, helping other members in the team and reviewing code), I helped out with organizing GOTO Stockholm meetups, drove our weekly book reading circle meetings, and drove people to do the weekly internal tech talks.

Backend developer

adTEN

Sep 2016 → Feb 2017 (6 months)

adTEN is the company developing the platforms of PlayAd Media Group, a digital video advertisement company. In day to day work, the separation between adTEN and PlayAd was not really a factor: we sat in the same office.

adTEN consisted of me, two other backend developers (one of them being the CTO), two frontend developers and the Head of Development.

The developers of adTEN managed two distinct platforms, both being combinations of Rails and Lua. One platform served ads, ran statistics for the serving of said ads and managed campaigns/publishers/partners, among other things. The other platform was a video player with syndicated content, a kind of "Youtube for your site, but not Youtube"-solution.

The Rails applications were in place for configuring the operation of the systems (used by the various departments of PlayAd), while the corresponding Lua applications read the data that was set up in databases by Rails and served the data to the outside world. This setup allowed for increased delivery performance. We used Amazon Web Services for running our machines and various auxiliary services.

The other two backend developers were split up, one for each of the two platforms. I was tasked with working on the ad serving platform.

My work started with taking care of minor issues here and there in both the Rails and Lua code, fixing bugs and developing small features.

After roughly one month I started developing a new ad type that required some restructuring of the both the Rails and Lua application, although primarily the latter. Since the latter was in charge of composing and serving the Javascript that rendered the ad for the user, I got to work a fair amount with modifying said Javascript.

Having finished the new ad type about a month later, I started working on replacing a legacy ad type with a new one. Specification was very limited, so this task involved a number meetings with other departments in the office, trying to figure out what it was that we wanted to achieve with this new ad type. While the coding itself was somewhat similar to the development of the previous ad type, more work was needed over in the Rails application, since the we had to ensure that all of the important functionality of the legacy code was covered. Early December this project was shipped.

During the development of this "legacy replacement" I had taken on a slightly more active role in responding to support emails and fixing production issues. I was also occasionally in talks with the design/creative department of the company, with them consulting on the technical feasibility of certain projects.

From the middle of December and forward, I was working with developing solutions for long running tasks, optimizing the platform to be able to serve certain data in a quicker manner.

Developer

Bonnier Digital

Sep 2014 → Aug 2016 (2 years)

Me and 5-10 other developers maintained a large monolithic Ruby backend with significant amounts of either raw SQL or PL/pgSQL, which served a number of different gambling sites.

My first couple of months were spent primarily either implementing non-project-related feature requests or bugfixes (generally submitted by the developers or operations). This was everything from improving how our caching worked to what information was included in our incident report emails.

About four or five months in I started dedicating more time to implementing features necessary for whatever project was deemed most important at the time by the non-developer stakeholders. This lead to some bouncing around from project to project, however it was all contained within the above mentioned monolithical platform.

This culminated in what could be considered a three to four month long "crunch" on a project where we built a JSON API. This API exposed various sets of data from our platform to client applications/sites, and provided more interactive features such as logging in, monetary operations (such as depositing/withdrawing money), making bets and launching the various gambling games.

After this crunch I took on some more administrative roles, while still trying to work as much as I can with the usual backend related tasks.

I took over and worked for six months as merge master (due to the separation of development and operations, integrating code into the platform was quite manual), meaning that I had the responsibility to both do a final check on all code that is to go into production and then merge it.

I also took on the role as main communicator between our development team and the development teams tasked with creating two other sites that were to integrate with our backend. This lead to answering questions over email/chat about our platform, attending meetings with stakeholders and development teams, and reporting back to our development team.

During the summer and I was also chosen as the most suitable for mentoring a new employee; I introduced him to our code and to our coding practices.

As might be evident from the above, the summer and a large part of the fall wasn't spent coding for me, however the administrative tasks and the mentoring ended up teaching be a lot about the non-coding aspects of being a programmer.

By the end of 2015, I slowly transitioned away from all of the non-coding tasks, since I felt that I had been doing that for too long. Developing the API became my full-time work, until a very large change in Winter 2016:

An executive decision was made to drop the large monolithic platform and outsource most of its functionality. This lead us to start implementing a proxy-like application in Go. This application eventually grew from just proxying calls to talking to multiple different services and databases.

Developer

Videofy

Jul 2014 → Sep 2014 (3 months)

Me and two other developers were responsible for the maintenance and improvement of a Padrino JSON serving API. Upon my arrival we quickly decided that the greatest problem which needed to be addressed was the fact that the system was running Ruby 1.8.7. This was blocking a lot of other projects and we decided that it was crucial to get the latest Ruby version in place.

However, as a first step I decided that the test suite needed to have all of its tests passing before one could with confidence move towards such a large project as updating the Ruby version. The tests were failing for a numerous reasons, but their primary problem was that they weren't cared for during an extended period of time. Technical deficiencies, bad practices and unreliable tests (false flagging) were common.

After three-four weeks the test suite was passing, which led me to the next big project: updating the system from Ruby 1.8.7 to Ruby 2.1.2.

Besides the expected syntax issues and library incompatibilities, the biggest issues that I faced was the change in how the newer Ruby made use of a core feature (Procs/blocks, in specific), and the fact that the project had significant amounts of monkey-patching code (code that changes standard behavior to custom behavior) which was applied to both their own code and the libraries.

The process of upgrading Ruby eventually led me to start rewriting the database caching mechanism (Redis powered), but this project was put on hold when the front-end team noticed that the sharing functionality in the app (which is dependent on the backend) was broken in a number of ways, which resulted in me being assigned with the task of fixing it. This project was not finished since it started just a few days before me leaving the company.

Developer

Sqore

Sep 2013 → Jul 2014 (11 months)

During my first months I was tasked with improving the code standard and finding ways to improve our day-to-day programming practices. This lead to some lasting improvements, with structured code review being one of them.

Apart from resolving bugs and taking care of refactoring here and there, I spent a lot of time reviewing code, ensuring that the code being deployed to our customers was correct and of quality. When some of my colleagues had embraced these practices, I could proceed to participate more in client and in-house projects.

The most important in-house project was a large Rails-app that acted as a search engine and aggregator for web based competition (many of which were our client projects). I was a part of the development and maintenance of this application.

The client projects were a couple of different Rails-apps that served as a base; these apps were tweaked according to the customer's needs and preferences.

While work with in-house projects was characterized by iterative improvement, the client projects were shorter, more intense and generally had the developers work more closely with the small group that was tasked with a specific client.

View more experience

Education

MSCS

Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan

2008 → May 2013

Since the content of the Bachelor degree is purely preparatory for the Master, I've had the opportunity to come in contact with a wide variety of languages, techiniques and technologies. I've participated in a couple of student organizations, primarily one which handles the operation and development of the web pages and services for students of my program.

Open Source (6)

bluecherries

Jun 2013 → Current (5 years, 4 months)

Generates passwords that are easy to type.

An unfinished Gem written during my time as an Apprentice at thoughtbot.

I wrote virtually all the code and decided on the functionality of the application, but did so with a great deal of help from my mentor. While the idea for the project came out of a personal need, it served primarily as a learning experience.

Since then it has been slowly developed on and off and has served as a place where I can practice the various patterns and best practices, which I read about or see in the wild.

progp-molbio

Nov 2012 → Mar 2013 (5 months)

A haskell exercise on the subject of molecular biology for the KTH course ProgP.

The first parts of this application were part of a mandatory exercise for a course that (among other things) taught the students about functional programming.

I revisited this exercise a year after finishing it out of curiosity only to discover how horrible that code was due to my very limited familiarity with the language. This is a rewrite of that code and also some non-compulsory exercises extending that code.

progp-pathfind

Nov 2012 → Nov 2012 (1 month)

A prolog pathfinder written for the KTH course ProgP.

A course provided exercise that I used to refresh my memory on the workings of Prolog.

adk-concordance

Sep 2012 → Oct 2012 (2 months)

A concordance written for the KTH course ADK.

I wrote the original version of this in Java with a course mate, but it was terrible. I decided to rewrite the entire thing on my own in C.

kalaha-solver

Jun 2012 → Jul 2012 (2 months)

Solves what the optimal first turn would be in a game of Swedish Kalaha.

This project was basically an exercise for improving my Haskell skills. The functional nature of recursing through all of the board states felt perfect for the language.

graham-scan-haskell

Jun 2012 → Jun 2012 (1 month)

A basic implementation of the Graham Scan algorithm.

A small project made when reading the Real World Haskell book.

View more open source

Stack Exchange

Community Name
Reputation

Public Artifacts

Readings

The Well-Grounded Rubyist

David A. Black

Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide

Miran Lipovaca

Real World Haskell

Bryan O'Sullivan, John Goerzen, Don Stewart

Crossing the Chasm

Geoffrey A. Moore

Erlang and OTP in Action

Martin Logan, Eric Merritt, and Richard Carlsson

Tools

Favorite editor NeoVim

Mikael Muszynski

Stockholm, Sweden http://linduxed.com

I'm a back-end developer, a speaker, and an avid learner.

The technical challenges of building systems, large and small, is something that I've found excites me. The wealth of technologies, techniques and practices to learn is energizing and inspiring.

The challenges need not only be technical: during the past years as a full time developer I've gotten to experience companies in varied industries, with teams of different shapes and sizes, having their own cultures and processes. Navigating these environments has taught me the value of listening and the importance of seeing the other party's perspective (be it colleague, department or customer).

My interest for the technical isn't limited to what goes on at work, which is why I'm both hosting, organizing and participating in meetups for programmers, with Haskell Stockholm being the one I put most effort into. Whether I'm presenting, leading or mingling, I find these gatherings to be invigorating.

If given the opportunity, I also enjoy teaching: I mentioned presenting, listening and seeing the other person's perspective; all of these come together when explaining things. The times I've been tasked with mentoring junior employees have been satisfying experiences. Bridging gaps between developers and non-developers is something I've, for similar reasons, enjoyed and have done plenty of times.

I take pride in the quality of my work, but I've come to learn the importance of flexibility; while the highest standard might be the aim, time to market might be the higher priority. What the team jointly decides to be the best way forward is what's important.

Other than the above, when I'm not doing various nerdy things, I do sport climbing on a regular basis, both indoors and outdoors.

Technical Skills

Likes: haskell ruby c vim linux archlinux rust elixir erlang clojure
Dislikes: php .net windows

Experience

Apr 2018 → Current Developer Erlang Solutions
erlang, elixir
Jul 2017 → Mar 2018 General Manager Trifork AB
project-management, reactjs, clojure, elixir, ruby-on-rails

I transitioned from developing to taking over the position of the General Manager of the office, when he left for another company. At the time, we were seven people.

My primary responsibility was managing the day-to-day tasks of the employed.

For the developers, this meant project management, where I made sure that they had as few obstacles outside of programming as possible. This included (but was not limited to) clarifying tasks with project owners, helping the developers to move forward if they were stuck for some reason, and managing the expectations of the clients.

For the community manager (so far responsible for running and promoting the GOTO brand in Stockholm) I had to guide his work toward finding new clients. While we still ran the GOTO meetups from time to time, we also organized events for the local businesses in our city district. Together, we also worked out a sales pipeline for finding clients in various industries, necessitated by us not having the option to hire for a sales department.

The second responsibility was to clean up legacy paperwork issues, going thorough piles of unsorted documents and receipts. While most of the work was done by a part-time assistant, occasional findings forced me to get engaged in administrative projects (sometimes even involving law firm guidance).

My third responsibility was sales, supported by the work of the community manager. This consisted of finding prospects, contacting them and setting up meetings.

The main development projects during my time have been a rewriting a ReactJS frontend, supporting a Clojure+AngularJS platform and developing a React Native app.

Late 2017 we entered a collaboration with a local Erlang consultancy to do sub-contractor work for them, where I did Elixir platform reviews and remote consulting.

Mar 2017 → Jun 2017 Developer Trifork AB
elixir, reactjs, kubernetes, docker, project-management, elm, phoenix-framework, amazon-web-services, google-compute-engine

My primary assignment was the development and maintenance of an Elixir+Phoenix application that runs the various GOTO conference sites. This includes both the user facing pages (such as front page, schedules, payment, etc.) and admin pages (speakers, talks, venues, rooms, schedules, etc.).

I started out by fixing various minor issues that littered the platform, cleaning up things that seemed to have been neglected for a while. Due to the diverse development backgrounds of the people on the team and varying quality of the code, I proposed to my boss that we institute a review process to spread knowledge and move toward more structured work. This was introduced, and I was tasked to help with the adoption of this and other development practices.

While the application more or less a standard Phoenix application, it and the database were running in Docker containers. For the purpose of learning, our boss instructed us to move the architecture to a Kubernetes cluster on Google Cloud Platform.

Apart from my development responsibilities (contributing to the platform, helping other members in the team and reviewing code), I helped out with organizing GOTO Stockholm meetups, drove our weekly book reading circle meetings, and drove people to do the weekly internal tech talks.

Sep 2016 → Feb 2017 Backend developer adTEN
lua, moonscript, ruby, amazon-web-services, javascript

adTEN is the company developing the platforms of PlayAd Media Group, a digital video advertisement company. In day to day work, the separation between adTEN and PlayAd was not really a factor: we sat in the same office.

adTEN consisted of me, two other backend developers (one of them being the CTO), two frontend developers and the Head of Development.

The developers of adTEN managed two distinct platforms, both being combinations of Rails and Lua. One platform served ads, ran statistics for the serving of said ads and managed campaigns/publishers/partners, among other things. The other platform was a video player with syndicated content, a kind of "Youtube for your site, but not Youtube"-solution.

The Rails applications were in place for configuring the operation of the systems (used by the various departments of PlayAd), while the corresponding Lua applications read the data that was set up in databases by Rails and served the data to the outside world. This setup allowed for increased delivery performance. We used Amazon Web Services for running our machines and various auxiliary services.

The other two backend developers were split up, one for each of the two platforms. I was tasked with working on the ad serving platform.

My work started with taking care of minor issues here and there in both the Rails and Lua code, fixing bugs and developing small features.

After roughly one month I started developing a new ad type that required some restructuring of the both the Rails and Lua application, although primarily the latter. Since the latter was in charge of composing and serving the Javascript that rendered the ad for the user, I got to work a fair amount with modifying said Javascript.

Having finished the new ad type about a month later, I started working on replacing a legacy ad type with a new one. Specification was very limited, so this task involved a number meetings with other departments in the office, trying to figure out what it was that we wanted to achieve with this new ad type. While the coding itself was somewhat similar to the development of the previous ad type, more work was needed over in the Rails application, since the we had to ensure that all of the important functionality of the legacy code was covered. Early December this project was shipped.

During the development of this "legacy replacement" I had taken on a slightly more active role in responding to support emails and fixing production issues. I was also occasionally in talks with the design/creative department of the company, with them consulting on the technical feasibility of certain projects.

From the middle of December and forward, I was working with developing solutions for long running tasks, optimizing the platform to be able to serve certain data in a quicker manner.

Sep 2014 → Aug 2016 Developer Bonnier Digital
ruby, postgresql, plpgsql, go

Me and 5-10 other developers maintained a large monolithic Ruby backend with significant amounts of either raw SQL or PL/pgSQL, which served a number of different gambling sites.

My first couple of months were spent primarily either implementing non-project-related feature requests or bugfixes (generally submitted by the developers or operations). This was everything from improving how our caching worked to what information was included in our incident report emails.

About four or five months in I started dedicating more time to implementing features necessary for whatever project was deemed most important at the time by the non-developer stakeholders. This lead to some bouncing around from project to project, however it was all contained within the above mentioned monolithical platform.

This culminated in what could be considered a three to four month long "crunch" on a project where we built a JSON API. This API exposed various sets of data from our platform to client applications/sites, and provided more interactive features such as logging in, monetary operations (such as depositing/withdrawing money), making bets and launching the various gambling games.

After this crunch I took on some more administrative roles, while still trying to work as much as I can with the usual backend related tasks.

I took over and worked for six months as merge master (due to the separation of development and operations, integrating code into the platform was quite manual), meaning that I had the responsibility to both do a final check on all code that is to go into production and then merge it.

I also took on the role as main communicator between our development team and the development teams tasked with creating two other sites that were to integrate with our backend. This lead to answering questions over email/chat about our platform, attending meetings with stakeholders and development teams, and reporting back to our development team.

During the summer and I was also chosen as the most suitable for mentoring a new employee; I introduced him to our code and to our coding practices.

As might be evident from the above, the summer and a large part of the fall wasn't spent coding for me, however the administrative tasks and the mentoring ended up teaching be a lot about the non-coding aspects of being a programmer.

By the end of 2015, I slowly transitioned away from all of the non-coding tasks, since I felt that I had been doing that for too long. Developing the API became my full-time work, until a very large change in Winter 2016:

An executive decision was made to drop the large monolithic platform and outsource most of its functionality. This lead us to start implementing a proxy-like application in Go. This application eventually grew from just proxying calls to talking to multiple different services and databases.

Jul 2014 → Sep 2014 Developer Videofy
ruby, ruby-on-rails, amazon-web-services, sql, mongodb, elasticsearch, redis, rspec, padrino

Me and two other developers were responsible for the maintenance and improvement of a Padrino JSON serving API. Upon my arrival we quickly decided that the greatest problem which needed to be addressed was the fact that the system was running Ruby 1.8.7. This was blocking a lot of other projects and we decided that it was crucial to get the latest Ruby version in place.

However, as a first step I decided that the test suite needed to have all of its tests passing before one could with confidence move towards such a large project as updating the Ruby version. The tests were failing for a numerous reasons, but their primary problem was that they weren't cared for during an extended period of time. Technical deficiencies, bad practices and unreliable tests (false flagging) were common.

After three-four weeks the test suite was passing, which led me to the next big project: updating the system from Ruby 1.8.7 to Ruby 2.1.2.

Besides the expected syntax issues and library incompatibilities, the biggest issues that I faced was the change in how the newer Ruby made use of a core feature (Procs/blocks, in specific), and the fact that the project had significant amounts of monkey-patching code (code that changes standard behavior to custom behavior) which was applied to both their own code and the libraries.

The process of upgrading Ruby eventually led me to start rewriting the database caching mechanism (Redis powered), but this project was put on hold when the front-end team noticed that the sharing functionality in the app (which is dependent on the backend) was broken in a number of ways, which resulted in me being assigned with the task of fixing it. This project was not finished since it started just a few days before me leaving the company.

Sep 2013 → Jul 2014 Developer Sqore
ruby, ruby-on-rails, mysql, heroku, amazon-web-services

During my first months I was tasked with improving the code standard and finding ways to improve our day-to-day programming practices. This lead to some lasting improvements, with structured code review being one of them.

Apart from resolving bugs and taking care of refactoring here and there, I spent a lot of time reviewing code, ensuring that the code being deployed to our customers was correct and of quality. When some of my colleagues had embraced these practices, I could proceed to participate more in client and in-house projects.

The most important in-house project was a large Rails-app that acted as a search engine and aggregator for web based competition (many of which were our client projects). I was a part of the development and maintenance of this application.

The client projects were a couple of different Rails-apps that served as a base; these apps were tweaked according to the customer's needs and preferences.

While work with in-house projects was characterized by iterative improvement, the client projects were shorter, more intense and generally had the developers work more closely with the small group that was tasked with a specific client.

Education

2008 → May 2013 MSCS Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan
java, haskell, prolog, logic, discrete-mathematics, calculus, algorithm, data-structures, relational-database, c, matlab, numerical-methods, linear-algebra

Since the content of the Bachelor degree is purely preparatory for the Master, I've had the opportunity to come in contact with a wide variety of languages, techiniques and technologies. I've participated in a couple of student organizations, primarily one which handles the operation and development of the web pages and services for students of my program.

Projects & Interests

Jun 2013 → Current bluecherries https://github.com/linduxed/bluecherries
ruby

Generates passwords that are easy to type.

An unfinished Gem written during my time as an Apprentice at thoughtbot.

I wrote virtually all the code and decided on the functionality of the application, but did so with a great deal of help from my mentor. While the idea for the project came out of a personal need, it served primarily as a learning experience.

Since then it has been slowly developed on and off and has served as a place where I can practice the various patterns and best practices, which I read about or see in the wild.

Nov 2012 → Mar 2013 progp-molbio https://github.com/linduxed/progp-molbio
haskell

A haskell exercise on the subject of molecular biology for the KTH course ProgP.

The first parts of this application were part of a mandatory exercise for a course that (among other things) taught the students about functional programming.

I revisited this exercise a year after finishing it out of curiosity only to discover how horrible that code was due to my very limited familiarity with the language. This is a rewrite of that code and also some non-compulsory exercises extending that code.

Nov 2012 → Nov 2012 progp-pathfind https://github.com/linduxed/progp-pathfind
prolog

A prolog pathfinder written for the KTH course ProgP.

A course provided exercise that I used to refresh my memory on the workings of Prolog.

Sep 2012 → Oct 2012 adk-concordance https://github.com/linduxed/adk-concordance
c

A concordance written for the KTH course ADK.

I wrote the original version of this in Java with a course mate, but it was terrible. I decided to rewrite the entire thing on my own in C.

Jun 2012 → Jul 2012 kalaha-solver https://github.com/linduxed/kalaha-solver
haskell

Solves what the optimal first turn would be in a game of Swedish Kalaha.

This project was basically an exercise for improving my Haskell skills. The functional nature of recursing through all of the board states felt perfect for the language.

Jun 2012 → Jun 2012 graham-scan-haskell https://github.com/linduxed/graham-scan-haskell
haskell

A basic implementation of the Graham Scan algorithm.

A small project made when reading the Real World Haskell book.

Public Artifacts

Writing more readable RSpec tests — http://linduxed.com/ http://linduxed.github.io/blog/2014/08/24/writing-more-readable-rspec-tests

A piece I wrote after getting fed up with projects that insist on using RSpec features that can introduce complexity in tests.

Readings

The Well-Grounded Rubyist David A. Black
Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!: A Beginner's Guide Miran Lipovaca
Real World Haskell Bryan O'Sullivan, John Goerzen, Don Stewart
Crossing the Chasm Geoffrey A. Moore
Erlang and OTP in Action Martin Logan, Eric Merritt, and Richard Carlsson

Tools

Favorite Editor: NeoVim