Print

Mark Simpson

Senior Software Engineer at WRLD3D

Scotland, United Kingdom
Last seen on Stack Overflow today

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Top Percentiles
Top 1%
Top 5%
Top 10%

Experience

Senior Software Engineer

eegeo

Sep 2010 → Current (8 years, 4 months)

Worked on the core technology for the eeGeo mapping platform. During this time, we built a few different versions of the technology using Unity3D and Flash (using the Away3D engine). Areas I worked in included spatial partitioning schemes, resource compilation / serialisation, streaming, shaders (AGAL -- not very nice), web services etc.

Researched and developed a solution for creating 3D roads from 2D spline data. Took it from R&D through to large scale (UK & US) coverage. Created a flexible codebase that was re-purposed for railways with a minimum of changes, too.

Implemented the Python side of our terrain data build, with an elegant mechanism for plugging in new data providers and mapping source GIS data land use codes to our own style of texturing.

Multi-threaded the resource building on the client in the Unity3D technology.

Optimisation work using CPU & GPU profilers targeting Unity3D and Flash (Stage3D). Identified and fixed numerous performance problems.

Created IDE-independent Flash build automation for the eeGeo mapping platform using GradleFX; also set up continuous integration with TeamCity.

Automated the data build python environment using curl, setuptools & pip.

Advocated automated testing of the Python data build pipeline (Hadoop-based). Integrated new libraries (nose, data-driven testing with ddt) to reduce boilerplate code. Worked with colleagues to ensured that the data build was robust, tests were more trustworthy and so on. Restructured the configuration of our Python tasks to reduce repetition, automated config validation, etc.

Created an automated end-to-end nightly build system for our EMR (Hadoop-based) resource build using Python and TeamCity. Each night, a limited geographical area is built using a small EMR cluster and deployed to a test resource store.

Prolific (internal) blogger, sharing knowledge wherever possible and encouraging others to follow suit.

Software Engineer

Realtime Worlds

Oct 2009 → Sep 2010 (1 year)

Worked on Project: MyWorld until RTW detonated.

Worked in diverse areas including:

  • Integration of tools with game code. Was responsible for serializing a lighting editor's output format, deserializing it on the client and then advancing the time of day in a customisable fashion so that observers could react to the changes.
  • Effects programming. Refactoring and improving the fidelity of a cheap, CPU based depth of field effect.
  • Build performance instrumentation. Employed aspect oriented programming using Castle Dynamic Proxy to record coarse-grained timings. Timings were then served to registered performance handlers (such as a debug form, a file logger and so forth). All code instrumentation could be toggled on and off at autofac registration time and was completely non-invasive beyond a [ProfileMe] attribute.
  • Backend work & web services. Crash logging for client stability.

Software Test Engineer

Realtime Worlds

Jan 2008 → Oct 2009 (1 year, 10 months)

Worked on Project: MyWorld.

My first professional job was a baptism of fire. At first, I was parachuted into an adversarial test department that received orbital over-the-wall code drops. I was then tasked with writing automated tests for already-written code. It was futile. By the time the production code was written, it was very hard to test and the tests couldn't accurately capture the intent or help shape the API.

This wasn't the fault of the software engineers writing the code, it was just the way things were -- the company was trying some things that were alien to games companies and hard to set up (Osherove & Misko are totally right on this point -- most developers don't know how to test and don't have the time to learn without appropriate support).

Despite being wet behind the ears, I set about building my knowledge of automated testing and then, with the support of my lead and some of the team leads, began to work with developers to identify suitable test strategies, write testable code and thorough tests (correct, atomic, repeatable, isolated etc.) perform code reviews and so on. I also researched and delivered multiple talks on testing practices. Along with the TE lead and one of my colleagues, I was responsible for interviewing, hiring and mentoring test engineers, too.

In short, we went from ineffective adversarial testing to the point where a couple of the teams were extremely proficient in automated testing skills and started schooling me on web testing, bdd and so on. The rest of the teams were either unwilling to even try automated testing or didn't believe in it. At that point I felt the job had run its course and moved into a Software Engineer role.

Lead Level Designer (amateur mod)

Fortress Forever (amateur mod)

Dec 2003 → Oct 2007 (3 years, 11 months)

Fortress Forever is an amateur mod project; it's still on the go now.

As an all-rounder, I worked in various disciplines throughout my time on the mod, including: design, lead level design, prop modelling, testing, recruitment, documentation, organisation etc. I also carried out bug fixing duties towards the end of the project.

It was a labour of love and, ultimately, the mod never achieved widespread popularity, but it was a fantastic experience and taught me a lot about developing and releasing a game.

Education

Computer Games Technology (First class honours)

Abertay University

Graduated with first class honours.

My dissertation subject was a comparative evaluation of deferred and forward shading for real time games; it was recommended for further dissemination by the course leader.

It's probably a bit dusty and inaccurate these days, but you can dig it up on my old site: www.defragdev.com

The course topics included: Maths, Dynamics, Network programming (programming with sockets, dead-reckoning, synchronisation etc.), PS2 programming (Linux kits) etc.

Top Posts

53

Rhino Mocks - Stub .Expect vs .AssertWasCalled

Jan 2010
What is your test trying to achieve? What behaviour or state are you verifying? Specifically, are you verifying that the collaborator (data) is having its ListCount method called (interaction ...
31

Resharper Exception rethrow possibly intended

Nov 2009
Maybe I'm not understanding the question, so please correct me if I've got the wrong end of the stick. There's two cases going on here: The first is that you catch the original exception. You then ...
32

How to start unit testing or TDD?

Sep 2009
Test first / test after: It should be noted that 'test first' as part of TDD is just as much (if not more) to do with design as it is to do with unit testing. It's a software development technique ...
10

How do you Setup your Unit Test Project(s) in .Net?

Jul 2009
IMO, if you want to make your tests easy to run, the test project(s) absolutely must go in the same solution as the production code. While putting tests in another solution may work if all developers ...
9

How to overcome unit test frustration? [closed]

Apr 2009
I'd like to spend those years learning about real developement skills. Unit testing is a valuable skill to have in your arsenal. Two reasons to chew over: As you write tests and find numerous types ...
55

Pitfalls of code coverage [closed]

Mar 2009
In a sentence: Code coverage tells you what you definitely haven't tested, not what you have. Part of building a valuable unit test suite is finding the most important, high-risk code and asking hard ...
View more top posts

Stack Exchange

Community Name
Reputation

Tools

First computer ZX Spectrum +3
Favorite editor Visual Studio (With R#)

Others

Background

Background

I'm a totally, totally decent guy. You would probably like me.

Mark Simpson

Scotland, United Kingdom http://defragdev.com/blog/

Technical Skills

Likes: c# .net python c++ automated-tests

Experience

Sep 2010 → Current Senior Software Engineer eegeo
.net, c#, asp.net-mvc, python, unity3d, nunit, as3, teamcity, git

Worked on the core technology for the eeGeo mapping platform. During this time, we built a few different versions of the technology using Unity3D and Flash (using the Away3D engine). Areas I worked in included spatial partitioning schemes, resource compilation / serialisation, streaming, shaders (AGAL -- not very nice), web services etc.

Researched and developed a solution for creating 3D roads from 2D spline data. Took it from R&D through to large scale (UK & US) coverage. Created a flexible codebase that was re-purposed for railways with a minimum of changes, too.

Implemented the Python side of our terrain data build, with an elegant mechanism for plugging in new data providers and mapping source GIS data land use codes to our own style of texturing.

Multi-threaded the resource building on the client in the Unity3D technology.

Optimisation work using CPU & GPU profilers targeting Unity3D and Flash (Stage3D). Identified and fixed numerous performance problems.

Created IDE-independent Flash build automation for the eeGeo mapping platform using GradleFX; also set up continuous integration with TeamCity.

Automated the data build python environment using curl, setuptools & pip.

Advocated automated testing of the Python data build pipeline (Hadoop-based). Integrated new libraries (nose, data-driven testing with ddt) to reduce boilerplate code. Worked with colleagues to ensured that the data build was robust, tests were more trustworthy and so on. Restructured the configuration of our Python tasks to reduce repetition, automated config validation, etc.

Created an automated end-to-end nightly build system for our EMR (Hadoop-based) resource build using Python and TeamCity. Each night, a limited geographical area is built using a small EMR cluster and deployed to a test resource store.

Prolific (internal) blogger, sharing knowledge wherever possible and encouraging others to follow suit.

Oct 2009 → Sep 2010 Software Engineer Realtime Worlds
.net, c#, nhibernate, asp.net-mvc, autofac, perforce, nunit, rhino-mocks, teamcity, nant

Worked on Project: MyWorld until RTW detonated.

Worked in diverse areas including:

  • Integration of tools with game code. Was responsible for serializing a lighting editor's output format, deserializing it on the client and then advancing the time of day in a customisable fashion so that observers could react to the changes.
  • Effects programming. Refactoring and improving the fidelity of a cheap, CPU based depth of field effect.
  • Build performance instrumentation. Employed aspect oriented programming using Castle Dynamic Proxy to record coarse-grained timings. Timings were then served to registered performance handlers (such as a debug form, a file logger and so forth). All code instrumentation could be toggled on and off at autofac registration time and was completely non-invasive beyond a [ProfileMe] attribute.
  • Backend work & web services. Crash logging for client stability.
Jan 2008 → Oct 2009 Software Test Engineer Realtime Worlds
.net, c#, nhibernate, asp.net-mvc, autofac, perforce, nunit, rhino-mocks, cruisecontrol

Worked on Project: MyWorld.

My first professional job was a baptism of fire. At first, I was parachuted into an adversarial test department that received orbital over-the-wall code drops. I was then tasked with writing automated tests for already-written code. It was futile. By the time the production code was written, it was very hard to test and the tests couldn't accurately capture the intent or help shape the API.

This wasn't the fault of the software engineers writing the code, it was just the way things were -- the company was trying some things that were alien to games companies and hard to set up (Osherove & Misko are totally right on this point -- most developers don't know how to test and don't have the time to learn without appropriate support).

Despite being wet behind the ears, I set about building my knowledge of automated testing and then, with the support of my lead and some of the team leads, began to work with developers to identify suitable test strategies, write testable code and thorough tests (correct, atomic, repeatable, isolated etc.) perform code reviews and so on. I also researched and delivered multiple talks on testing practices. Along with the TE lead and one of my colleagues, I was responsible for interviewing, hiring and mentoring test engineers, too.

In short, we went from ineffective adversarial testing to the point where a couple of the teams were extremely proficient in automated testing skills and started schooling me on web testing, bdd and so on. The rest of the teams were either unwilling to even try automated testing or didn't believe in it. At that point I felt the job had run its course and moved into a Software Engineer role.

Dec 2003 → Oct 2007 Lead Level Designer (amateur mod) Fortress Forever (amateur mod)
hammer, c++, source-engine, lua, 3ds-max, photoshop

Fortress Forever is an amateur mod project; it's still on the go now.

As an all-rounder, I worked in various disciplines throughout my time on the mod, including: design, lead level design, prop modelling, testing, recruitment, documentation, organisation etc. I also carried out bug fixing duties towards the end of the project.

It was a labour of love and, ultimately, the mod never achieved widespread popularity, but it was a fantastic experience and taught me a lot about developing and releasing a game.

Education

Computer Games Technology (First class honours) Abertay University
c++, directx, opengl, hlsl

Graduated with first class honours.

My dissertation subject was a comparative evaluation of deferred and forward shading for real time games; it was recommended for further dissemination by the course leader.

It's probably a bit dusty and inaccurate these days, but you can dig it up on my old site: www.defragdev.com

The course topics included: Maths, Dynamics, Network programming (programming with sockets, dead-reckoning, synchronisation etc.), PS2 programming (Linux kits) etc.

Projects & Interests

Mar 2009 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/83891/mark-simpson
Written 136 answers. Active in testing, unit-testing, c#, code-coverage, debugging and 6 other tags.

Others

Background Background

I'm a totally, totally decent guy. You would probably like me.

Tools

First Computer: ZX Spectrum +3
Favorite Editor: Visual Studio (With R#)