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Nicholas Perry

Co-Founder / Lead Designer at Praetor Labs

South Burlington, VT, United States
Last seen on Stack Overflow 13 days ago

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Non-preferred technologies
Top Percentiles
Top 20%

Experience

Co-Founder / Lead Designer

Praetor Labs

Oct 2010 → Current (8 years, 3 months)

What started as a shoe-string software venture with a friend has turned into a development-house located in South Burlington. We call it "[The L.A.B.]"

Praetor Laboratories is our incubator for all the projects we want to work on and will hopefully become the foundation of a successful lean startup.

Our first serious attempt at an application is in development. The prototype had proved more than useful for my personal use so we are looking at better technologies to get ourselves off the ground.

We took a hiatus during my time at All-Access and the domain for the project has since lapsed in registration. We have started the initiative again at http://praetorlabs.com

Initially a PHP / MySQL app running at [now defunct website], we have decided to move to a more productive pipeline. Currently we are working on a Scala (TypeSafe Stack) based system. We are aiming to use rest-like connections between servers to make it easier to mesh various languages and services together.

Our current focus is on developing a cluster of ShuttlePCs to run as the framework for our site. This lets us experiment with DevOps principles and will hopefully allow us to be less dependent on the typical grunt work involved with managing servers. Our end goal is to have a hybrid cloud system that runs between our servers and AWS.

We are also working on a robot in our basement.

Software Engineer

Systems & Software, Inc.

Feb 2013 → Nov 2013 (10 months)

I helped with the design, development and support of industry leading customer information systems (CIS), Utility Billing Solutions and Financial Management Software (FMS) . As a vertical, we offered services to investor-owned and municipal utilities through our flagship product "enQuesta" and the suite of related software.

As part of a medium sized team of software engineers, I worked in a cross disciplinary fashion. My roles included working with legacy financial systems (COBOL, AIX, CVS) and expanding on relatively recent technology like GWT, Java Serverlets, ICEfaces, and XHTML/CSS.

I gained experience using a Service Oriented Architecture. I also spent time working on Tomcat/JBoss server setups, minor database maintenance, and general product configuration. I also used my skills in web development to apply skins to the front-end of public facing payment portals.

My main outcome was gaining experience as a developer within a corporate environment. I touched upon the complete product life-cycle - system design, development, unit/integration testing, deployment, and on-going support.

Service Desk Technician

All-Access Infotech, LLC

Sep 2011 → Aug 2012 (1 year)

I assisted with remote management and IT support needs for a large number of businesses in the north-east region (vt, nh, me). As part of a small team, my role spanned many disciplines as we adapted to the ever changing needs of our clients.

Highlights include: Successfully implementing shell scripting for automated computer setups and clean-ups for our various clients. The typical computer setup time went from 2+hrs per machine down to a little less than 20 minutes and production line ready.

My main focus ended up as spearheading a lot of automation technologies while helping to change the company over to Kaseya's RMM offering.

Help Desk Technician

VTC Information Technology

Aug 2007 → Dec 2009 (2 years, 5 months)

Tech-support including: Windows systems maintenance, networking, and computer repair. Within a demanding college environment serving 1,800+ students and 100+ faculty/staff.

Part time during the school year(s) and full time during one summer. Originally a work-study student, I managed to get on direct hire because my dedication and diligence and willingness to take the time and teach my fellow work-studies.

Education

B.S. Computer Engineering

Vermont Technical College

2004 → 2009

3.1 GPA

"The Adventurer's Guild" (Gaming Club): Vice-President '09 and long standing member. Helped run weekly lan-parties and assisted with managing board-game nights.

Highschool / College Hybrid (Computer Engineering)

Vermont Academy of Science and Technology

2004 → 2005

Hundreds of students apply to V.A.S.T. which is an expedited college hybrid program (and accredited high-school). To be selected, you must have excellent grades and a strong math background. I was chosen as one of only a handful of students to partake in the program.

Graduated with Honors.

Certifications

CompTia A+

Jul 2012 → Jul 2015 (3 years, 1 month)

Apps & Software

Praetor Laboratories

Website: Praetor Laboratories is a small *ware development venture and private idea incubator located in South Burlington Vermont. We make stuff like websites and killer robots.

Developed website for Praetor Laboratories. I am the Co-Founder and lead designer. Currently living at [The L.A.B.]

Top Posts

1

Restore OneNote Ribbon from backup

Nov 2011
I answered my own question. An esoteric Google search lead me to: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee704589.aspx The documentation discusses where the UI files are stored. It mentions the ...
5

Can S-Video drive HDTV?

Nov 2009
Usually the ones that include a component converter aren't actually s-video, but a proprietary connection that uses a similar shape/plug. Take a look at the closeups in the picture below. The one ...
4

Notebook wakes up after disconnecting mouse

Nov 2009
Control Panel-> (window/startmenu -> control panel) Mouse-> (icon) Hardware-> (tab) Properties-> (button) Change Setting-> (button:vista/win 7 only) PowerManagement-> (tab) Allow this device to ...
8

What are the popular, contemporary uses for Perl?

Jun 2009
The problem with this question, is that Perl is a very versatile language. Between code golf and it's similarity to awk/sed, it is still widely used as a glue language and quick go-to language for ...
11

How could I add an entry to the right click menu?

Dec 2008
in the registry, HKEY CLASSES ROOT houses the stuff you need. specifically (any file) HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shellex\ContextMenuHandlers (any folder) HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell ...
View more top posts

Stack Exchange (9)

Readings (21)

Effective Programming: More Than Writing Code

Jeff Atwood

I follow Jeff's Blog and have always come away with a better appreciation of the world of programming. This book is a great way to get reintroduced to some of his more iconical programming entries.

Rework

Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson

I learned that I have what it takes to meet the needs of all the other parts that are needed to run an effective business. But more importantly I found that these parts aren't as boring as everyone makes them out to be.

Mastering Perl

brian d foy

If brian d foy has his name on it, I've probably read it. that includes most of his posts in StackOverflow. I'd love to work in a Perl development outfit that appreciates Perl as much as he does. I find Perl to be a very productive language for certain types of programming tasks.

Mastering Regular Expressions

Jeffrey E.F. Friedl

I have an affinity for regular expressions. The points in this book helped to improve my ability to read and write them in a much more consistent and idiomatic way, while avoiding some of the little things that make it hard for other developers to understand them.

The Non-Designer's Design Book

Robin Williams

This book has given me the super-power to scream inside my head when I see fliers done in Word. Everything is comic-sans and centered. (Oh the humanity!)

It is a very thorough introduction to design elements and makes an effort to teach you the theory behind why things are done the way they are.

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

David Allen

I've indirectly used the system in my college career after discovering blogs about it online. I finally got around to reading this book shortly out of college and I wish I had read it sooner, I was missing so much!

I have since implemented a GTD system using microsoft OneNote and have had a ubiquitous capture device (notepad) on me almost ever since.

Principles of Parallel Programming

Calvin Lin, Larry Snyder

I am currently re-reading this book in more depth. It was a required reading for a new course that I was unable to take, so I barrowed it from a friend.

The detail it goes into about the various parallel processor systems is superb. As a principles book, I already can appreciate the concepts and way of thinking that it is presenting. I plan on following it up with a book that takes these concepts more specifically concerning CUDA or OpenCL as some of things I'd like to eventually do will require this type of programming.

Java How to Program, 7th Edition

Harvey M. Deitel, Paul J. Deitel

I had this book as part of a course that covered Swing and basic Java, but didn't' actually need it at the time. I got sick of my lack of knowledge about the Java ecosystem while on a hobby project so I started reading it. I was quickly impressed by the thoroughness of covered concepts and the programming examples were superb.

16 more

Tools

First computer Zenith ZWL-184-97 (8088)
Favorite editor Notepad++, Eclipse, Code::Blocks, Visual Studio, Emacs, GEdit, Photoshop & Illustrator, Google Docs

Others

Background

Background

1987 - May

Born.

1990 - Age 3

Played my first video game on a NES. Excite Bike!

1991 - Age 4

Introduced to programming. My uncle showed me a computer game on his commodore 64 and walked me through what it was doing.

1992 - Spring - Age 5

Learned how to type on an Apple Macintosh Color Classic during our afternoon computer labs. We all had a great time with the paint program's stamp tools.

1994 - Age 7

Played around on my mom's Zenith ZWL-184-97 (?) and I messed around with BASIC and customized a number of the games from "Basic Computer Games" book. I managed even though I had no idea what a loop was.

1995 - Age 8

Skipped grade levels for English and Math courses. Passed with A's despite missing ~60 days of school.

1997 - Age 10

Bought our first true family computer. Windows 95 was awesome compared to DOS. I jumped through hoops with MS-Works' spreadsheet for fun, and read almost every entry in Microsoft's encyclopedia Britannica. I also played some Carmen Sandiego. Then the internet happened.

1999 - Winter - Age 12

Gifted my first computer. A gateway 466mhz Celeron running windows 98 se. I played Diablo, 'Populous: The Beginning', and Atomic Bomberman. It went through many upgrades and a paint job over the years. I named it 'Underdog'.

2000 - Spring - Age 12

Skipped up to 8th grade Math class and did my Science as a self-study.

2001 - Spring - Age 14

Started messing around with HTML and reading about game development after getting obsessed with the computer game 'Black & White'. I found my way to developer websites and communities and started learning more about software development in general.

2002 - Summer - Age 15

Took a couple community college courses. One was a comprehensive A+ cert course and it was the best course I've ever failed.

I also took an advanced algebra class, and a course on web-development. My quaint final project is still up on tripod: http://ultimape.tripod.com/ . The site was originally hand rolled although I re-did everything later with Dreamweaver to have better standards compliance.

2003 - Summer - Age 16

Managed to get into Upward Bound at Lyndon State College. Upward Bound was a program to help high-school students prepare for college.

As a result, I ended up getting 1420(/1600) on my SATs, 720 on my SAT2 Math, and getting 75hours of community service working as a volunteer in the IT shop. I spent my mornings in some intro to programming courses and I spent my evenings playing Quake III in the computer labs.

During a college expo at the end of the UB summer program, I learned about V.A.S.T. and realized I could start college early and leave my high-school in the dust.

2004 - Fall - Age 17

Did a number of self-studies in highscool for Art (Learned Photoshop & Illustrator). I was also moved up to Senior level Math and Yearbook class.

2005 - Winter - Age 17

Built second computer from parts during winter break. Named it 'Acxendor'.

2005 - Fall - Age 18

Started my final year of high school as a V.A.S.T. student. I took a C programming course and finally learned how loops worked.

2006 - Spring - Age 18

Graduated from V.A.S.T. and got my diploma. I liked the environment at VTC so I decided to stay on for the rest of my degree.

2006 - Winter - Age 18

Got my first laptop, a gateway Tablet PC. I love Tablet PCs.

2007 - Spring - Age 18

Nicholas Perry

South Burlington, VT, United States http://praetorlabs.com/

Technical Skills

Likes: web-applications game-programming html css jquery c++ scala perl arduino javascript
Dislikes: anti-patterns

Experience

Oct 2010 → Current Co-Founder / Lead Designer Praetor Labs
scala, processing, java, html, javascript, html5, arduino, unity3d, robotics, jquery, event-driven-design, mysql, nginx, centos, xen, hyper-v

What started as a shoe-string software venture with a friend has turned into a development-house located in South Burlington. We call it "[The L.A.B.]"

Praetor Laboratories is our incubator for all the projects we want to work on and will hopefully become the foundation of a successful lean startup.

Our first serious attempt at an application is in development. The prototype had proved more than useful for my personal use so we are looking at better technologies to get ourselves off the ground.

We took a hiatus during my time at All-Access and the domain for the project has since lapsed in registration. We have started the initiative again at http://praetorlabs.com

Initially a PHP / MySQL app running at [now defunct website], we have decided to move to a more productive pipeline. Currently we are working on a Scala (TypeSafe Stack) based system. We are aiming to use rest-like connections between servers to make it easier to mesh various languages and services together.

Our current focus is on developing a cluster of ShuttlePCs to run as the framework for our site. This lets us experiment with DevOps principles and will hopefully allow us to be less dependent on the typical grunt work involved with managing servers. Our end goal is to have a hybrid cloud system that runs between our servers and AWS.

We are also working on a robot in our basement.

Feb 2013 → Nov 2013 Software Engineer Systems & Software, Inc.
cobol, aix, cvs, gwt, java, oracle10g, html, ksh, perl, pdfbox, itext, linux, redhat, tomcat, ajax, icefaces, soa

I helped with the design, development and support of industry leading customer information systems (CIS), Utility Billing Solutions and Financial Management Software (FMS) . As a vertical, we offered services to investor-owned and municipal utilities through our flagship product "enQuesta" and the suite of related software.

As part of a medium sized team of software engineers, I worked in a cross disciplinary fashion. My roles included working with legacy financial systems (COBOL, AIX, CVS) and expanding on relatively recent technology like GWT, Java Serverlets, ICEfaces, and XHTML/CSS.

I gained experience using a Service Oriented Architecture. I also spent time working on Tomcat/JBoss server setups, minor database maintenance, and general product configuration. I also used my skills in web development to apply skins to the front-end of public facing payment portals.

My main outcome was gaining experience as a developer within a corporate environment. I touched upon the complete product life-cycle - system design, development, unit/integration testing, deployment, and on-going support.

Sep 2011 → Aug 2012 Service Desk Technician All-Access Infotech, LLC
windows-server-2008-r2, powershell, batch, windows, remote-desktop, kaseya, ms-office

I assisted with remote management and IT support needs for a large number of businesses in the north-east region (vt, nh, me). As part of a small team, my role spanned many disciplines as we adapted to the ever changing needs of our clients.

Highlights include: Successfully implementing shell scripting for automated computer setups and clean-ups for our various clients. The typical computer setup time went from 2+hrs per machine down to a little less than 20 minutes and production line ready.

My main focus ended up as spearheading a lot of automation technologies while helping to change the company over to Kaseya's RMM offering.

Aug 2007 → Dec 2009 Help Desk Technician VTC Information Technology
batch, windows-7, windows-xp, computer-support, computer-hardware, ms-office, helpdesk-support

Tech-support including: Windows systems maintenance, networking, and computer repair. Within a demanding college environment serving 1,800+ students and 100+ faculty/staff.

Part time during the school year(s) and full time during one summer. Originally a work-study student, I managed to get on direct hire because my dedication and diligence and willingness to take the time and teach my fellow work-studies.

Education

2004 → 2009 B.S. Computer Engineering Vermont Technical College

3.1 GPA

"The Adventurer's Guild" (Gaming Club): Vice-President '09 and long standing member. Helped run weekly lan-parties and assisted with managing board-game nights.

2004 → 2005 Highschool / College Hybrid (Computer Engineering) Vermont Academy of Science and Technology

Hundreds of students apply to V.A.S.T. which is an expedited college hybrid program (and accredited high-school). To be selected, you must have excellent grades and a strong math background. I was chosen as one of only a handful of students to partake in the program.

Graduated with Honors.

Certifications

Jul 2012 → Jul 2015 CompTia A+

Projects & Interests

Dec 2008 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/42082/ape-inago
Written 59 answers. Active in c++.

Apps & Software

Praetor Laboratories http://praetorlabs.com/
html, css, jquery

Website: Praetor Laboratories is a small *ware development venture and private idea incubator located in South Burlington Vermont. We make stuff like websites and killer robots.

Developed website for Praetor Laboratories. I am the Co-Founder and lead designer. Currently living at [The L.A.B.]

Nicholas T. Perry: Computer Engineer - Résumé http://praetorlabs.com/profile/nperry/resume/nperry_resume.html
html5, css

Online Resume. Fully Printable. Version 4.0, Active Date: 2013-01-10

Written 100% by hand. Validates as HTML5.

Others

Background Background

1987 - May

Born.

1990 - Age 3

Played my first video game on a NES. Excite Bike!

1991 - Age 4

Introduced to programming. My uncle showed me a computer game on his commodore 64 and walked me through what it was doing.

1992 - Spring - Age 5

Learned how to type on an Apple Macintosh Color Classic during our afternoon computer labs. We all had a great time with the paint program's stamp tools.

1994 - Age 7

Played around on my mom's Zenith ZWL-184-97 (?) and I messed around with BASIC and customized a number of the games from "Basic Computer Games" book. I managed even though I had no idea what a loop was.

1995 - Age 8

Skipped grade levels for English and Math courses. Passed with A's despite missing ~60 days of school.

1997 - Age 10

Bought our first true family computer. Windows 95 was awesome compared to DOS. I jumped through hoops with MS-Works' spreadsheet for fun, and read almost every entry in Microsoft's encyclopedia Britannica. I also played some Carmen Sandiego. Then the internet happened.

1999 - Winter - Age 12

Gifted my first computer. A gateway 466mhz Celeron running windows 98 se. I played Diablo, 'Populous: The Beginning', and Atomic Bomberman. It went through many upgrades and a paint job over the years. I named it 'Underdog'.

2000 - Spring - Age 12

Skipped up to 8th grade Math class and did my Science as a self-study.

2001 - Spring - Age 14

Started messing around with HTML and reading about game development after getting obsessed with the computer game 'Black & White'. I found my way to developer websites and communities and started learning more about software development in general.

2002 - Summer - Age 15

Took a couple community college courses. One was a comprehensive A+ cert course and it was the best course I've ever failed.

I also took an advanced algebra class, and a course on web-development. My quaint final project is still up on tripod: http://ultimape.tripod.com/ . The site was originally hand rolled although I re-did everything later with Dreamweaver to have better standards compliance.

2003 - Summer - Age 16

Managed to get into Upward Bound at Lyndon State College. Upward Bound was a program to help high-school students prepare for college.

As a result, I ended up getting 1420(/1600) on my SATs, 720 on my SAT2 Math, and getting 75hours of community service working as a volunteer in the IT shop. I spent my mornings in some intro to programming courses and I spent my evenings playing Quake III in the computer labs.

During a college expo at the end of the UB summer program, I learned about V.A.S.T. and realized I could start college early and leave my high-school in the dust.

2004 - Fall - Age 17

Did a number of self-studies in highscool for Art (Learned Photoshop & Illustrator). I was also moved up to Senior level Math and Yearbook class.

2005 - Winter - Age 17

Built second computer from parts during winter break. Named it 'Acxendor'.

2005 - Fall - Age 18

Started my final year of high school as a V.A.S.T. student. I took a C programming course and finally learned how loops worked.

2006 - Spring - Age 18

Graduated from V.A.S.T. and got my diploma. I liked the environment at VTC so I decided to stay on for the rest of my degree.

2006 - Winter - Age 18

Got my first laptop, a gateway Tablet PC. I love Tablet PCs.

2007 - Spring - Age 18

Readings

Effective Programming: More Than Writing Code Jeff Atwood http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Programming-More-Than-Writing/dp/147830054X%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D147830054X

I follow Jeff's Blog and have always come away with a better appreciation of the world of programming. This book is a great way to get reintroduced to some of his more iconical programming entries.

Expert C# Business Objects (Books for Professionals by Professionals) Rockford Lhotka http://www.amazon.com/Expert-Business-Objects-Books-Professionals/dp/1590593448%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D1590593448

I read this book on a whim, and wasn't disappointed. I am not a c# programmer, but the concepts and problems that this book presents are universal for large scale buisness programing. Seeing how such a system can be setup was very enlightening.

Rework Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson http://www.amazon.com/Rework-Jason-Fried/dp/0307463745%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0307463745

I learned that I have what it takes to meet the needs of all the other parts that are needed to run an effective business. But more importantly I found that these parts aren't as boring as everyone makes them out to be.

Getting Real: The smarter, faster, easier way to build a successful web application Jason Fried, Heinemeier David Hansson, Matthew Linderman http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Real-smarter-successful-application/dp/0578012812%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0578012812

Every part of this book is chock-full of great recommendations and tactics for "getting real". As a software developer who plans to ship code, this has been invaluable.

Programming in Scala: A Comprehensive Step-by-Step Guide, 2nd Edition Martin Odersky, Lex Spoon, Bill Venners http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Scala-Comprehensive-Step-Step/dp/0981531644%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0981531644
Actors in Scala Philipp Haller, Frank Sommers http://www.amazon.com/Actors-Scala-Philipp-Haller/dp/0981531652%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0981531652
Effective C++: 55 Specific Ways to Improve Your Programs and Designs (3rd Edition) Scott Meyers http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Specific-Improve-Programs-Designs/dp/0321334876%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321334876

Aside from the various specifics, I found the discussions in this book to help me to understand some of the nuances that make the difference between a newbie C++ coder, and a professional.

More Effective C++: 35 New Ways to Improve Your Programs and Designs Scott Meyers http://www.amazon.com/More-Effective-Improve-Programs-Designs/dp/020163371X%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D020163371X
The C++ Programming Language: Special Edition Bjarne Stroustrup http://www.amazon.com/The-Programming-Language-Special-Edition/dp/0201700735%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0201700735

Understanding some of the motivations behind C++ helped me to appreciate the of the more obscure parts of the language.

Effective STL: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your Use of the Standard Template Library Scott Meyers http://www.amazon.com/Effective-STL-Specific-Standard-Template/dp/0201749629%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0201749629

In my algorithms and data structures coursework, we were introduced to the STL. After the course ended, I found myself diving head first into what the could do. I picked up this book to help guide me around some of the little gotchas that I was running into. I refer to it regularly when working on my c++ projects.

Mastering Perl brian d foy http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Perl-brian-d-foy/dp/0596527241%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0596527241

If brian d foy has his name on it, I've probably read it. that includes most of his posts in StackOverflow. I'd love to work in a Perl development outfit that appreciates Perl as much as he does. I find Perl to be a very productive language for certain types of programming tasks.

Effective Perl Programming: Ways to Write Better, More Idiomatic Perl (2nd Edition) (Effective Software Development Series) Joseph N. Hall, Joshua A. McAdams, brian d foy http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Perl-Programming-Idiomatic-Development/dp/0321496949%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321496949

There may be "more than one way to do it" in Perl, but idiomatic Perl is definitely one of the best. I often refer to chapter/sections in this book in my program's comments.

Mastering Regular Expressions Jeffrey E.F. Friedl http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Regular-Expressions-Jeffrey-Friedl/dp/0596528124%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0596528124

I have an affinity for regular expressions. The points in this book helped to improve my ability to read and write them in a much more consistent and idiomatic way, while avoiding some of the little things that make it hard for other developers to understand them.

A+, Network+, Security+ Exams in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference (In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)) Pawan K. Bhardwaj http://www.amazon.com/Network-Security-Exams-Nutshell-Reference/dp/0596528248%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0596528248

I read this over a weekend and realized that I probably didn't need much of it to get A+ certified. It's always nice to have a refresher before taking an exam. I hope to get certified in Network+ and Security+ in the long run.

GUI Bloopers: Don'ts and Do's for Software Developers and Web Designers (Interactive Technologies) Jeff Johnson http://www.amazon.com/GUI-Bloopers-Developers-Interactive-Technologies/dp/1558605827%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D1558605827

This book taught me to think about user expectations and the power of UI conventions in a program. As a library book, I hardly remember the specifics, but I still consider it inspirational for pointing me down the right path.

Because of this book, I am always conscious of Ux issues even though I may not be a pro.

Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition Steve Krug http://www.amazon.com/Dont-Make-Me-Think-Usability/dp/0321344758%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321344758

You mean you haven't read this book yet?

The Non-Designer's Design Book Robin Williams http://www.amazon.com/Non-Designers-Design-Book-Robin-Williams/dp/0321193857%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321193857

This book has given me the super-power to scream inside my head when I see fliers done in Word. Everything is comic-sans and centered. (Oh the humanity!)

It is a very thorough introduction to design elements and makes an effort to teach you the theory behind why things are done the way they are.

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity David Allen http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Things-Done-Stress-Free-Productivity/dp/0142000280%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0142000280

I've indirectly used the system in my college career after discovering blogs about it online. I finally got around to reading this book shortly out of college and I wish I had read it sooner, I was missing so much!

I have since implemented a GTD system using microsoft OneNote and have had a ubiquitous capture device (notepad) on me almost ever since.

Principles of Parallel Programming Calvin Lin, Larry Snyder http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Parallel-Programming-Calvin-Lin/dp/0321487907%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321487907

I am currently re-reading this book in more depth. It was a required reading for a new course that I was unable to take, so I barrowed it from a friend.

The detail it goes into about the various parallel processor systems is superb. As a principles book, I already can appreciate the concepts and way of thinking that it is presenting. I plan on following it up with a book that takes these concepts more specifically concerning CUDA or OpenCL as some of things I'd like to eventually do will require this type of programming.

Java How to Program, 7th Edition Harvey M. Deitel, Paul J. Deitel http://www.amazon.com/Java-How-Program-7th-Edition/dp/0132222205%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0132222205

I had this book as part of a course that covered Swing and basic Java, but didn't' actually need it at the time. I got sick of my lack of knowledge about the Java ecosystem while on a hobby project so I started reading it. I was quickly impressed by the thoroughness of covered concepts and the programming examples were superb.

Remote: Office Not Required Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson http://www.amazon.com/Remote-Office-Required-Jason-Fried/dp/0804137501%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0804137501

Tools

First Computer: Zenith ZWL-184-97 (8088)
Favorite Editor: Notepad++, Eclipse, Code::Blocks, Visual Studio, Emacs, GEdit, Photoshop & Illustrator, Google Docs