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Paul W. Olsen Jr.

Adjunct Professor at Skidmore College

Glenville, NY, United States

Technologies

Preferred technologies

Experience

Adjunct Professor

Skidmore College

Aug 2014 → Dec 2014 (5 months)
java

Responsibilities:

  • Design and presentation of course materials
  • Writing and grading exams
  • Preparing and grading homework assignments
  • Aiding students with projects
  • Holding office hours

Summer Research Assistant

Department of Computer Science, University at Albany -- State University of New York

May 2012 → Aug 2014 (2 years, 4 months)
java latex eclipse

Responsibilities:

  • Conducting research
  • Managing projects
  • Writing project reports (some of which have been published)

Teaching Assistant

Department of Computer Science, University at Albany -- State University of New York

Aug 2010 → May 2014 (3 years, 10 months)
java c

Responsibilities:

  • Designing labs
  • Grading assignments and exams
  • Holding office hours
  • Substituting for professors

Education

Ph.D. Computer Science (expected)

University at Albany -- State University of New York

2010 → 2015
java c latex ml eclipse
  • Maintained a GPA over 3.8/4.0
  • Thesis: Exploiting Graph Structure to Efficiently Find Central Vertices
  • Served as co-chair for New Trends in Computer Science (NTCS) 2014, an annual department-wide event where students share research

M.S.

University at Albany -- State University of New York

2010 → 2014
java c ml eclipse latex
  • Maintained a GPA over 3.8/4.0
  • Master's project: "Efficient Top-k Closeness Centrality Search", published in the proceedings of International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE) 2014
  • Received the Best Poster Award for a poster presented at a plenary poster session during ICDE 2014

B.A.

University at Albany -- State University of New York

2007 → 2010
java c
  • Double majored in Philosophy and Computer Science
  • Graduated Summa Cum Laude, GPA: 3.75/4.0
  • On Dean's list from Fall 2008 to Spring 2010

Public Artifacts

TrajMetrix: A Trajectory Compression Benchmarking Framework — International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems 2012 (ACM SIGSPATIAL GIS) 2014

Trajectory compression algorithms enable efficient transmission, storage, and processing of trajectory data by eliminating redundant information. While a large number of compression algorithms have been developed, there is no comprehensive and convenient benchmarking system for evaluating these algorithms. We will demonstrate TrajMetrix, our system that meets the above need. We will show how TrajMetrix can be used to gain insights into the benefits and drawbacks of various compression algorithms given different compression requirements. From the knowledge attained by using TrajMetrix, we developed SQUISH-E (Spatial QUalIty Simplification Heuristic - Extended). This algorithm uses a priority queue to preferentially remove points based on the error introduced by their removal. Through live demonstrations that use both synthetic and real data sets, we will show the ability of SQUISH-E to effectively bound compression error with low computational overhead.

Scalable and Robust Management of Dynamic Graph Data — International Workshop on Big Dynamic Distributed Data (BD3) 2013

Most real-world networks evolve over time. This evolution can be modeled as a series of graphs that represent a network at different points in time. Our G* system enables efficient storage and querying of these graph snapshots by taking advantage of the commonalities among them. We are extending G* for highly scalable and robust operation. This paper shows that the classic challenges of data distribution and replication are imbued with renewed significance given continuously generated graph snapshots. Our data distribution technique adjusts the set of worker servers for storing each graph snapshot in a manner optimized for popular queries. Our data replication approach maintains each snapshot replica on a different number of workers, making available the most efficient replica configurations for different types of queries.

A Framework for Efficient and Convenient Evaluation of Trajectory Compression Algorithms — International Conference on Computing for Geospatial Research and Application (COMGEO) 2013

Trajectory compression algorithms eliminate redundant information in the history of a moving object. Such compression enables efficient transmission, storage, and processing of trajectory data. Although a number of compression algorithms have been proposed in the literature, no common benchmarking platform for evaluating their effectiveness exists. This paper presents a benchmarking framework for efficiently, conveniently, and accurately comparing trajectory compression algorithms. This framework supports various compression algorithms and metrics defined in the literature, as well as three synthetic trajectory generators that have different trade-offs. It also has a highly extensible architecture that facilitates the incorporation of new compression algorithms, evaluation metrics, and trajectory data generators. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of trajectory compression algorithms, evaluation metrics and data generators in conjunction with detailed discussions on their unique benefits and relevant application scenarios. Furthermore, this paper describes challenges that arise in the design and implementation of the above framework and our approaches to tackling these challenges. Finally, this paper presents evaluation results that demonstrate the utility of the benchmarking framework.

Efficient Top-k Closeness Centrality Search — International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE) 2014

Many of today's applications can benefit from the discovery of the most central entities in real-world networks. This paper presents a new technique that efficiently finds the k most central entities in terms of closeness centrality. Instead of computing the centrality of each entity independently, our technique shares intermediate results between centrality computations. Since the cost of each centrality computation may vary substantially depending on the choice of the previous computation, our technique schedules centrality computations in a manner that minimizes the estimated completion time. This technique also updates, with negligible overhead, an upper bound on the centrality of every entity. Using this information, our technique proactively skips entities that cannot belong to the final answer. This paper presents evaluation results for actual networks to demonstrate the benefits of our technique.

Others

Background

Background

I began programming in middle school on a Texas Instruments calculator. After years of Java in high school, I discovered philosophy while I was an undergraduate at the University at Albany. I obtained my undergraduate degree, majoring in philosophy and computer science, after three years of study.

Not satisfied with a B.A. degree, I enrolled in Albany’s computer science Ph.D. program in 2010. Since then I have worked on a number of projects involving big data, graph analytics, and GPS trajectory compression. Many of these projects have lead to publications, nine of which are listed on Google Scholar. I have a Masters degree in hand, and I plan to complete my Ph.D. in August 2015.

Paul W. Olsen Jr.

Glenville, NY, United States

Technical Skills

Likes: java c ml eclipse latex

Experience

Aug 2014 → Dec 2014 Adjunct Professor Skidmore College
java

Responsibilities:

  • Design and presentation of course materials
  • Writing and grading exams
  • Preparing and grading homework assignments
  • Aiding students with projects
  • Holding office hours
May 2012 → Aug 2014 Summer Research Assistant Department of Computer Science, University at Albany -- State University of New York
java, latex, eclipse

Responsibilities:

  • Conducting research
  • Managing projects
  • Writing project reports (some of which have been published)
Aug 2010 → May 2014 Teaching Assistant Department of Computer Science, University at Albany -- State University of New York
java, c

Responsibilities:

  • Designing labs
  • Grading assignments and exams
  • Holding office hours
  • Substituting for professors

Education

2010 → 2015 Ph.D. Computer Science (expected) University at Albany -- State University of New York
java, c, latex, ml, eclipse
  • Maintained a GPA over 3.8/4.0
  • Thesis: Exploiting Graph Structure to Efficiently Find Central Vertices
  • Served as co-chair for New Trends in Computer Science (NTCS) 2014, an annual department-wide event where students share research
2010 → 2014 M.S. University at Albany -- State University of New York
java, c, ml, eclipse, latex
  • Maintained a GPA over 3.8/4.0
  • Master's project: "Efficient Top-k Closeness Centrality Search", published in the proceedings of International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE) 2014
  • Received the Best Poster Award for a poster presented at a plenary poster session during ICDE 2014
2007 → 2010 B.A. University at Albany -- State University of New York
java, c
  • Double majored in Philosophy and Computer Science
  • Graduated Summa Cum Laude, GPA: 3.75/4.0
  • On Dean's list from Fall 2008 to Spring 2010

Public Artifacts

TrajMetrix: A Trajectory Compression Benchmarking Framework — International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems 2012 (ACM SIGSPATIAL GIS) 2014 https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8iHdJXwKruXcDV6VkF0TVFqeGs&authuser=0

Trajectory compression algorithms enable efficient transmission, storage, and processing of trajectory data by eliminating redundant information. While a large number of compression algorithms have been developed, there is no comprehensive and convenient benchmarking system for evaluating these algorithms. We will demonstrate TrajMetrix, our system that meets the above need. We will show how TrajMetrix can be used to gain insights into the benefits and drawbacks of various compression algorithms given different compression requirements. From the knowledge attained by using TrajMetrix, we developed SQUISH-E (Spatial QUalIty Simplification Heuristic - Extended). This algorithm uses a priority queue to preferentially remove points based on the error introduced by their removal. Through live demonstrations that use both synthetic and real data sets, we will show the ability of SQUISH-E to effectively bound compression error with low computational overhead.

Scalable and Robust Management of Dynamic Graph Data — International Workshop on Big Dynamic Distributed Data (BD3) 2013 https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8iHdJXwKruXdklUWWExWk16R0E&authuser=0

Most real-world networks evolve over time. This evolution can be modeled as a series of graphs that represent a network at different points in time. Our G* system enables efficient storage and querying of these graph snapshots by taking advantage of the commonalities among them. We are extending G* for highly scalable and robust operation. This paper shows that the classic challenges of data distribution and replication are imbued with renewed significance given continuously generated graph snapshots. Our data distribution technique adjusts the set of worker servers for storing each graph snapshot in a manner optimized for popular queries. Our data replication approach maintains each snapshot replica on a different number of workers, making available the most efficient replica configurations for different types of queries.

A Framework for Efficient and Convenient Evaluation of Trajectory Compression Algorithms — International Conference on Computing for Geospatial Research and Application (COMGEO) 2013 https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8iHdJXwKruXN1NaX2ZmZEh2d2M&authuser=0

Trajectory compression algorithms eliminate redundant information in the history of a moving object. Such compression enables efficient transmission, storage, and processing of trajectory data. Although a number of compression algorithms have been proposed in the literature, no common benchmarking platform for evaluating their effectiveness exists. This paper presents a benchmarking framework for efficiently, conveniently, and accurately comparing trajectory compression algorithms. This framework supports various compression algorithms and metrics defined in the literature, as well as three synthetic trajectory generators that have different trade-offs. It also has a highly extensible architecture that facilitates the incorporation of new compression algorithms, evaluation metrics, and trajectory data generators. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of trajectory compression algorithms, evaluation metrics and data generators in conjunction with detailed discussions on their unique benefits and relevant application scenarios. Furthermore, this paper describes challenges that arise in the design and implementation of the above framework and our approaches to tackling these challenges. Finally, this paper presents evaluation results that demonstrate the utility of the benchmarking framework.

Efficient Top-k Closeness Centrality Search — International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE) 2014 https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B8iHdJXwKruXRV9uN0hCWkZFSlE&authuser=0

Many of today's applications can benefit from the discovery of the most central entities in real-world networks. This paper presents a new technique that efficiently finds the k most central entities in terms of closeness centrality. Instead of computing the centrality of each entity independently, our technique shares intermediate results between centrality computations. Since the cost of each centrality computation may vary substantially depending on the choice of the previous computation, our technique schedules centrality computations in a manner that minimizes the estimated completion time. This technique also updates, with negligible overhead, an upper bound on the centrality of every entity. Using this information, our technique proactively skips entities that cannot belong to the final answer. This paper presents evaluation results for actual networks to demonstrate the benefits of our technique.

Others

Background Background

I began programming in middle school on a Texas Instruments calculator. After years of Java in high school, I discovered philosophy while I was an undergraduate at the University at Albany. I obtained my undergraduate degree, majoring in philosophy and computer science, after three years of study.

Not satisfied with a B.A. degree, I enrolled in Albany’s computer science Ph.D. program in 2010. Since then I have worked on a number of projects involving big data, graph analytics, and GPS trajectory compression. Many of these projects have lead to publications, nine of which are listed on Google Scholar. I have a Masters degree in hand, and I plan to complete my Ph.D. in August 2015.