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Raphael Reitzig

Computer Scientist. Programmer. Teacher.

Würzburg, Germany
github.com/reitzig
Last seen on Stack Overflow 4 days ago

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Non-preferred technologies
Top Percentiles
Top 5%
Top 10%
Top 20%

Experience

IT Consultant

codecentric AG

Jun 2019 → Current (2 years, 1 month)

Software Developer

Telepaxx Medical Data

Dec 2016 → May 2019 (2 years, 6 months)
swift java kotlin spring-boot grails jenkins docker jsonschema documentation automated-tests build-automation gradle git

Research Assistant

University of Kaiserslautern

Oct 2012 → Apr 2016 (3 years, 7 months)
ruby wolfram-mathematica latex git algorithm data-structures

My responsibilities were twofold: support my advisor's teaching and do research.

My priorities rested with my teaching obligations; it was important to me to ensure that our students would take away as much as possible from our courses. Specific tasks I performed include

  • organizing exercises for undergraduate courses of varying size (5-20 and 100-200 participants),
  • managing and supporting teams of TAs (5-10 individuals),
  • creating exercise and exam problems and solutions of sufficient quality,
  • filling in as lecturer (about once or twice a term),
  • acting as TA for graduate courses, and
  • general support of our students.

Together with a colleague of mine, I created an elaborate framework (mostly with LaTeX and Git) for managing large collections of problems (300+ pages) in an accessible and maintainable fashion. This was essential for us to deal effectively (and efficiently) with changing needs and preferences as well as update demands in the context of exercise sheet and exam composition. We also created tools to generate and evaluate pseudonymized exams efficiently and safely.

In my final term, I got to implement a flipped course. While my choices, including active learning techniques, where supervised, I enjoyed large autonomy regarding execution.


In what time was left I actually got to explore the landscape of computer science research on my own for a bit. I summarized my activities on my website. Several avenues of investigations lead into dead ends open questions, but there was some success as well.

Research Intern

Chalmers University of Technology

Oct 2010 → Mar 2011 (6 months)
scala machine-learning latex

My task was to re-implement the NETGEM tool which was only available as a Matlab prototype. The goal was to have a more flexible, expandable and easily usable implementation that would adapt to future research ideas.

My Scala version achieved these goals but did not end up being used in future research as far as I can tell.

It was during this project that I learned Scala, and that ugly nested loop to in fact outperform nice abstractions if you are not very, very careful. I also learned that machine learning has less to offer than its reputation suggests, or had at that time.

Student Assistant

University of Kaiserslautern

2008 → 2009 (2 years)
java antlr swing

I implemented a GUI (Java) for a model checking tool pipeline developed as part of Prof. Dr. Ina Schaefer's doctoral thesis. This included constructing a parser for a domain-specific language (temporal logic) for which I used a parser generator (ANTLR). I also touched upon Katja, an approach to bring order-sorted, immutable datatypes to Java.

Education

M.Sc. Computer Science

University of Kaiserslautern

2009 → 2012
java svn algorithm gnuplot data-structures parallel-processing concurrency distributed-computing spring intellij-idea latex compilation wolfram-mathematica

My master project team developed MaLiJAn, a tool for average-case algorithm analysis. Given user-defined sets of inputs, it executes specially annotated code and proposes asymptotics for block-visit counts. From this, it is possible to derive asymptotics for user-defined cost measures.

MaLiJAn provides a GUI frontend for easy use and a distributed backend for the simulation workload. It has been successfully used for generating and supporting hypotheses in algorithm analysis, in particular on non-uniform input distributions.


For my master thesis, I investigated how dynamic programming recurrences can be computed in parallel. Under reasonable assumptions, I was able to establish a characterisation of which kinds of recurrences can be computed in parallel on shared-memory machines.

I then implemented several variants (proof-of-concept quality) and compared their performance; I observed consistent speed-ups. Finally, I created a plugin for the Scala compiler that would generate parallel code from an annotated dynamic programming recursion.

Thus, I showed that it is possible to simplify parallel programming by empowering compilers using abstract algorithmic considerations.

B.Sc. Computer Science

University of Kaiserslautern

2006 → 2009
formal-languages java svn swing

My bachelor project team developed JAguc, a GUI application written in Java. It facilitates identifying large samples of RNA data efficiently and supports the user during the whole process. Particular care was taken to create a tool that biology researchers -- typically less than technology-savvy -- would actually be able to work with effectively.

The tool has been used heavily by biology researchers. It remains to be one of the most efficient and, maybe more importantly, usable tools in its field.

Open Source

container-do

Jun 2020 → Current (1 year, 1 month) 63 commits / 4,996 ++ / 1,381 -- Last commit on Feb 17, 21
go docker github-actions

Run project-level CLI tools in containers.

SDKMAN! for fish

Nov 2018 → Current (2 years, 8 months) 71 commits / 2,247 ++ / 1,094 -- Last commit on Dec 14, 20
fish cucumber github-actions

Wraps the bash-only SDKMAN! so that can be used in fish shells, including completion.

ltx2any

Oct 2012 → Current (8 years, 9 months) 17 commits / 454 ++ / 2,228 -- Last commit on Aug 30, 17
ruby latex

Yet another LaTeX build wrapper with a couple of nifty features: Automatically compiles as often as necessary; executes additional programs as necessary; aggregates errors and warning into a single, readable log file; certain extensions work in parallel.

I am the only developer on this project. Development has been slow and on an on-demand basis mostly, but ongoing for years. I use the tool myself for all my LaTeX projects.

To the best of my knowledge, the core features of ltx2any are novel and do not exist in other tools.

TeXLogParser

Mar 2018 → Sep 2018 (7 months) 78 commits / 10,213 ++ / 3,643 -- Last commit on Sep 15, 18
ruby latex continuous-integration rubygems

Eases many pains around digesting logs from (La)TeX engines. Used as a command-line program or library, it converts (La)TeX logs into human- or machine-readable forms.

Apps & Software

HealthDataSpace

Dec 2018
grails postgresql spock jenkins docker groovy cucumber

We continuously maintain our backend service. My focus has lately been on improving our automated testing pipelines.

HealthDataSpace Access Codes

Jul 2018
java kotlin spring-boot mockito gradle jsonschema

Simplifies patient access to medical images. My main contributions were around requirements engineering, specification and validation of interfaces.

HealthDataSpace SDK for Apple

Aug 2017
swift rest xmpp

Easy access to the features of HealthDataSpace from iOS and macOS apps. I co-lead the project from design through implementation to release.

Top Posts

48

How does a computer work?

Sep 2012
This is a broad question that does not have an easy answer; it's a long way from electrons skittering along copper wires to rendering a website in Firefox. I will attempt to give you an overview from ...
4

Branch and Bound explanation

May 2012
Consider scheduling, the task of assigning jobs with certain durations and deadlines to machines. We assume discrete time. Many such problems are NP(O)-hard. In particular, this answer will talk ...

Stack Exchange

Community Name
Reputation

Public Artifacts

A Practical and Worst-Case Efficient Algorithm for Divisor Methods of Apportionment

Sep 2015

Proportional apportionment is the problem of assigning seats to parties according to their relative share of votes. Divisor methods are the de-facto standard solution, used in many countries.

In recent literature, there are two algorithms that implement divisor methods: one by Cheng and Eppstein (ISAAC, 2014) has worst-case optimal running time but is complex, while the other (Pukelsheim, 2014) is relatively simple and fast in practice but does not offer worst-case guarantees.

We demonstrate that the former algorithm is much slower than the other in practice and propose a novel algorithm that avoids the shortcomings of both. We investigate the running-time behavior of the three contenders in order to determine which is most useful in practice.

Efficient Algorithms for Envy-Free Stick Division With Fewest Cuts

Apr 2015

Abstract: Segal-Halevi, Hassidim, and Aumann (AAMAS, 2015) propose the problem of cutting sticks so that at least k sticks have equal length and no other stick is longer. This allows for an envy-free allocation of sticks to k players, one each. The resulting number of sticks should also be minimal.

We analyze the structure of this problem and devise a linear-time algorithm for it.

Readings

A Guide to Experimental Algorithmics

Catherine C. McGeoch

This book is a great introduction into performing scientific experiments with algorithms, a skill that is employed and taught far too rarely in algorithms research.

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

David Allen

I learned that having too many things floating around in my mind actively slows me down. This seems obvious in hindsight, but you get so used to (slowly increasing levels) of noise that you do not really notive until it is gone.

I also learned how to get rid of the noise and transform it into useful, organized data. I expect this to be an ongoing, ever-lasting process -- but this book was essential to get me started.

Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students, and Saving Faculty Time

Linda Nilson

Nilson claims to have a solution for many problems that plague academic teaching. Her concept is very intriguing and holds promise, pending controlled studies that show the efficacy.

I have some reservations about her assumptions and have to think more about how specifications grading can be implemented in STEM courses in rather restricted, single-exam circumstances.

The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series)

Mark Sisson

Sisson proposes a small set of rules for nutrition, exercise and lifestyle. If you follow these rules, so he promises, you will (re)gain and retain health, fitness and performance. Aside from many success stories you can find on the web, his reasoning is twofold: 1) the rules fit the behaviour humans evolved to and 2) science supports the principles and shows their efficacy. His website links to hundreds of scientic articles to that effect.

I have only started to implement the Primal Bluepring rules (mostly nutrition, exercise to follow; lifestyle will be the hardest), and I already feel better for it.

Tools

Favorite editor Jetbrains IDEs, VSCode, gedit, vim

Technical Skills

Likes: kotlin java latex antlr linux git algorithm data-structures parallel-processing automata cucumber kubernetes containers
Dislikes: windows c c++ javascript php ios macos

Experience

Jun 2019 → Current IT Consultant codecentric AG
Dec 2016 → May 2019 Software Developer Telepaxx Medical Data
swift, java, kotlin, spring-boot, grails, jenkins, docker, jsonschema, documentation, automated-tests, build-automation, gradle, git
Oct 2012 → Apr 2016 Research Assistant University of Kaiserslautern
ruby, wolfram-mathematica, latex, git, algorithm, data-structures

My responsibilities were twofold: support my advisor's teaching and do research.

My priorities rested with my teaching obligations; it was important to me to ensure that our students would take away as much as possible from our courses. Specific tasks I performed include

  • organizing exercises for undergraduate courses of varying size (5-20 and 100-200 participants),
  • managing and supporting teams of TAs (5-10 individuals),
  • creating exercise and exam problems and solutions of sufficient quality,
  • filling in as lecturer (about once or twice a term),
  • acting as TA for graduate courses, and
  • general support of our students.

Together with a colleague of mine, I created an elaborate framework (mostly with LaTeX and Git) for managing large collections of problems (300+ pages) in an accessible and maintainable fashion. This was essential for us to deal effectively (and efficiently) with changing needs and preferences as well as update demands in the context of exercise sheet and exam composition. We also created tools to generate and evaluate pseudonymized exams efficiently and safely.

In my final term, I got to implement a flipped course. While my choices, including active learning techniques, where supervised, I enjoyed large autonomy regarding execution.


In what time was left I actually got to explore the landscape of computer science research on my own for a bit. I summarized my activities on my website. Several avenues of investigations lead into dead ends open questions, but there was some success as well.

Oct 2010 → Mar 2011 Research Intern Chalmers University of Technology
scala, machine-learning, latex

My task was to re-implement the NETGEM tool which was only available as a Matlab prototype. The goal was to have a more flexible, expandable and easily usable implementation that would adapt to future research ideas.

My Scala version achieved these goals but did not end up being used in future research as far as I can tell.

It was during this project that I learned Scala, and that ugly nested loop to in fact outperform nice abstractions if you are not very, very careful. I also learned that machine learning has less to offer than its reputation suggests, or had at that time.

2008 → 2009 Student Assistant University of Kaiserslautern
java, antlr, swing

I implemented a GUI (Java) for a model checking tool pipeline developed as part of Prof. Dr. Ina Schaefer's doctoral thesis. This included constructing a parser for a domain-specific language (temporal logic) for which I used a parser generator (ANTLR). I also touched upon Katja, an approach to bring order-sorted, immutable datatypes to Java.

Education

2009 → 2012 M.Sc. Computer Science University of Kaiserslautern
java, svn, algorithm, gnuplot, data-structures, parallel-processing, concurrency, distributed-computing, spring, intellij-idea, latex, compilation, wolfram-mathematica

My master project team developed MaLiJAn, a tool for average-case algorithm analysis. Given user-defined sets of inputs, it executes specially annotated code and proposes asymptotics for block-visit counts. From this, it is possible to derive asymptotics for user-defined cost measures.

MaLiJAn provides a GUI frontend for easy use and a distributed backend for the simulation workload. It has been successfully used for generating and supporting hypotheses in algorithm analysis, in particular on non-uniform input distributions.


For my master thesis, I investigated how dynamic programming recurrences can be computed in parallel. Under reasonable assumptions, I was able to establish a characterisation of which kinds of recurrences can be computed in parallel on shared-memory machines.

I then implemented several variants (proof-of-concept quality) and compared their performance; I observed consistent speed-ups. Finally, I created a plugin for the Scala compiler that would generate parallel code from an annotated dynamic programming recursion.

Thus, I showed that it is possible to simplify parallel programming by empowering compilers using abstract algorithmic considerations.

2006 → 2009 B.Sc. Computer Science University of Kaiserslautern
formal-languages, java, svn, swing

My bachelor project team developed JAguc, a GUI application written in Java. It facilitates identifying large samples of RNA data efficiently and supports the user during the whole process. Particular care was taken to create a tool that biology researchers -- typically less than technology-savvy -- would actually be able to work with effectively.

The tool has been used heavily by biology researchers. It remains to be one of the most efficient and, maybe more importantly, usable tools in its field.

Projects & Interests

Dec 2010 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/539599/raphael
Written 164 answers. Active in swift, docker, docker-compose, kotlin, scala and 3 other tags.
Jun 2020 → Current container-do https://github.com/reitzig/container-do
go, docker, github-actions

Run project-level CLI tools in containers.

Nov 2018 → Current SDKMAN! for fish https://github.com/reitzig/sdkman-for-fish
fish, cucumber, github-actions

Wraps the bash-only SDKMAN! so that can be used in fish shells, including completion.

Oct 2012 → Current ltx2any https://github.com/akerbos/ltx2any
ruby, latex

Yet another LaTeX build wrapper with a couple of nifty features: Automatically compiles as often as necessary; executes additional programs as necessary; aggregates errors and warning into a single, readable log file; certain extensions work in parallel.

I am the only developer on this project. Development has been slow and on an on-demand basis mostly, but ongoing for years. I use the tool myself for all my LaTeX projects.

To the best of my knowledge, the core features of ltx2any are novel and do not exist in other tools.

Mar 2018 → Sep 2018 TeXLogParser https://github.com/reitzig/texlogparser
ruby, latex, continuous-integration, rubygems

Eases many pains around digesting logs from (La)TeX engines. Used as a command-line program or library, it converts (La)TeX logs into human- or machine-readable forms.

Public Artifacts

Sep 2017 Secure Infrastructure for the Mobile Legion https://www.slideshare.net/rreitzig/secure-infrastructure-for-the-mobile-legion

Talk given at eHealth Innovation Days 2017

Jan 2016 How useful is Landau notation? http://reitzig.github.io/ramblings/2016/how-useful-is-landau-notation

Some thoughts about how useful Landau notation (also “Big-Oh”) really is.

Sep 2015 A Practical and Worst-Case Efficient Algorithm for Divisor Methods of Apportionment http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.06475

Proportional apportionment is the problem of assigning seats to parties according to their relative share of votes. Divisor methods are the de-facto standard solution, used in many countries.

In recent literature, there are two algorithms that implement divisor methods: one by Cheng and Eppstein (ISAAC, 2014) has worst-case optimal running time but is complex, while the other (Pukelsheim, 2014) is relatively simple and fast in practice but does not offer worst-case guarantees.

We demonstrate that the former algorithm is much slower than the other in practice and propose a novel algorithm that avoids the shortcomings of both. We investigate the running-time behavior of the three contenders in order to determine which is most useful in practice.

Apr 2015 Efficient Algorithms for Envy-Free Stick Division With Fewest Cuts http://arxiv.org/abs/1502.04048

Abstract: Segal-Halevi, Hassidim, and Aumann (AAMAS, 2015) propose the problem of cutting sticks so that at least k sticks have equal length and no other stick is longer. This allows for an envy-free allocation of sticks to k players, one each. The resulting number of sticks should also be minimal.

We analyze the structure of this problem and devise a linear-time algorithm for it.

Apps & Software

Dec 2018 HealthDataSpace https://healthdataspace.org/
grails, postgresql, spock, jenkins, docker, groovy, cucumber

We continuously maintain our backend service. My focus has lately been on improving our automated testing pipelines.

Jul 2018 HealthDataSpace Access Codes https://sdk.healthdataspace.org/how-health-clouds-help-medical-practices-speeding-up-their-work-processes/
java, kotlin, spring-boot, mockito, gradle, jsonschema

Simplifies patient access to medical images. My main contributions were around requirements engineering, specification and validation of interfaces.

Aug 2017 HealthDataSpace SDK for Apple https://sdk.healthdataspace.org/
swift, rest, xmpp

Easy access to the features of HealthDataSpace from iOS and macOS apps. I co-lead the project from design through implementation to release.

Readings

A Guide to Experimental Algorithmics Catherine C. McGeoch http://www.amazon.com/Guide-Experimental-Algorithmics-Catherine-McGeoch/dp/0521173019

This book is a great introduction into performing scientific experiments with algorithms, a skill that is employed and taught far too rarely in algorithms research.

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity David Allen http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Things-Done-Stress-Free-Productivity/dp/0143126563

I learned that having too many things floating around in my mind actively slows me down. This seems obvious in hindsight, but you get so used to (slowly increasing levels) of noise that you do not really notive until it is gone.

I also learned how to get rid of the noise and transform it into useful, organized data. I expect this to be an ongoing, ever-lasting process -- but this book was essential to get me started.

Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students, and Saving Faculty Time Linda Nilson http://www.amazon.com/Specifications-Grading-Restoring-Motivating-Students/dp/1620362422

Nilson claims to have a solution for many problems that plague academic teaching. Her concept is very intriguing and holds promise, pending controlled studies that show the efficacy.

I have some reservations about her assumptions and have to think more about how specifications grading can be implemented in STEM courses in rather restricted, single-exam circumstances.

The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) Mark Sisson http://www.marksdailyapple.com/

Sisson proposes a small set of rules for nutrition, exercise and lifestyle. If you follow these rules, so he promises, you will (re)gain and retain health, fitness and performance. Aside from many success stories you can find on the web, his reasoning is twofold: 1) the rules fit the behaviour humans evolved to and 2) science supports the principles and shows their efficacy. His website links to hundreds of scientic articles to that effect.

I have only started to implement the Primal Bluepring rules (mostly nutrition, exercise to follow; lifestyle will be the hardest), and I already feel better for it.

The Power of Habit Charles Duhigg http://charlesduhigg.com/the-power-of-habit/

Tools

Favorite Editor: Jetbrains IDEs, VSCode, gedit, vim