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Ry4an Brase

Principal Software Engineer at Duo Security

Ann Arbor, MI, United States
github.com/ry4an
Last seen on Stack Overflow 12 days ago

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Non-preferred technologies
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Experience (6)

Principal Software Engineer

Duo Security

Aug 2016 → Current (2 years, 5 months)

Developer-y operations or operations-y developer.

VP, Engineering

DramaFever

Jul 2012 → Jul 2016 (4 years, 1 month)

Manage a team of 40, reporting to the CEO with direct involvement in: - Developing customer facing and backend features on a Django + JS stack - Increased search effiency by implementing Swiftype for in-site search and autocomplete - Built "big data" video analytics system with millions of data points per day analyzed using Amazon DyanamoDB, Elastic Map Reduce (Hadoop / Hive), and Redshift cutting reporting time from days to minutes - Helping build-out processes and tooling with GitHub, standard branching practices, continuous integration (Jenkins), IRC, and code review - Increasing monitoring with New Relic and Graphite - Working on improved streaming video over Akamai with HLS - Set top box / smart TV development for Panasonic, LG, and Samsung

Software Developer

8thBridge

Apr 2011 → Jul 2012 (1 year, 4 months)
  • Debugging and developing software for high-volume, high-reliability transaction processing with highly variable input and data store requirements
  • Conduting code reviews for security and correctness using GitHub and JIRA/Crucible
  • Helping to manage large Amazon EC2 deployments using Chef for automation and Jenkins for builds and deploys
  • Using NewRelic, Cacti, Graphite, Splunk, Snort, Pingdom, Akamai, Cloud Front, PagerDuty,and BrowserMob to ensure always-on availability
  • Primary point of contact for PCI-DSS certification -- one of the first on Amazon Web Services / Elastic Computing Cloud (AWS-EC2)

Software Developer

University of Minnesota - Supercomputing Institute

2010 → 2011 (2 years)

I help researchers with varying degrees of technical experience to use our computing infrastructure to further their research goals. I work with multiple research teams at a time who, when they initially contact us, can have as little as a partially written grant proposal or as much as some code which needs help to achieve greater parallelization on our massively multi-core systems.

The variety of academic field, technologies, and roles affords me great opportunities to exercise a diverse set of skills both technical and managerial. Just recently my efforts have included:

  • code review (Perl, Python, C++, Java)
  • security audit (CSS, CSRF, Perl, Apache)
  • release planning and management (Mercurial, Basecamp, status reports, formal release approval)
  • academic / technical liaison (grant writing
  • system specification and configuration (Linux, Apache, Python/Paste)

Working simultaneously on multiple projects for researchers to whom I don't report organizationally has honed by my communication and scheduling skills as I balance my time expenditures to align with project needs and fractional support from multiple grants.

One of many recent projects has been the specification, installation, configuration, and management of the Galaxy genomics / bioinformatics platform at the UMN. As lead technical resource on this project I set up the initial proof of concept, provided training for researchers and fellow developers, authored release procedures, and supervised the technical-side of a university wide roll out.

Director of Development, Co-founder

Swarmcast, Inc.

2002 → 2010 (9 years)

Built a team of 15 engineers from the ground up, and set their goals, selected their tools, crafted their environment, defined their procedures, and oversaw quality. Reliably delivered customer-facing software with a resalable product focus on time and under budget. Wrote a fair fraction of it too.

Oversaw processional services groups in North America, Europe, and Asia. Tasks included project scheduling, resource allocation, and international travel.

Managed the patent process, including 13 provisional patents filed in the US and as PCT. Two fully granted with the rest still pending.

Software Developer / Team Lead

Others

1995 → 2002 (8 years)

This is a placeholder position to show that I've been around for awhile. Look at the last fifteen years for the interesting stuff.

View more experience

Education

B.S. Computer Science

University of Minnesota

1995 → 2000
  • Student research assistant
  • Institute of Technology Honors Student
  • Association of Computing Machinery chapter vice-president

Open Source

occupied

Jul 2013 → Current (5 years, 5 months)

Fun little mini-project using Twine + go + App Engine

I created this mini hardware + software project to display the availability of our office bathrooms on the web. There's a full writeup on my blog.

dircproxy

Nov 2011 → Current (7 years, 2 months)

dircproxy is an IRC proxy server ("bouncer") designed for people who use IRC from lots of different workstations or clients, but wish to remain connected and see what they missed while they were away. You connect to IRC through dircproxy, and it keeps you connected to the server, even after you detach your client from it. While you're detached, it logs channel and private messages as well as important events, and when you reattach it'll let you know what you missed. Join us on IRC: irc.freenode.net #dircproxy

Found and fixed some IPC problems in a forked DNS resolver's memory handling.

Top Posts

228

Hg: How to do a rebase like git's rebase

Apr 2010
VonC has the answer you're looking for, the Rebase Extension. It is, however, worth spending a second or two thinking about why neither mq nor rebase are enabled by default in mercurial: because ...
76

How do I cherry-pick a single revision in Mercurial?

Nov 2009
Tonfa is right. What you're describing isn't 'merging' (or 'pushing' or 'pulling'); it's 'cherry-picking'. A push or a pull moves all the changesets from one repo to another that aren't already in ...
91

Android download binary file problems

Feb 2009
I don't know if it's the only problem, but you've got a classic Java glitch in there: You're not counting on the fact that read() is always allowed to return fewer bytes than you ask for. Thus, your ...

Stack Exchange

Community Name
Reputation

Public Artifacts

The Wedding Planned With Bugzilla (2006) — Ry4an.org

For years I'd watched an event planner who worked out of the same coffee shop I did practice her trade. So nearly as I could tell she lived entirely in a world of post-it notes and phone calls. On any given day I'd watch 500 different pieces of information flit before her mental windshield with no discernible organizational system I could recognize. It drove me crazy. I wanted to offer to help her come up with a computer based solution that would patch all the holes in her process I was sure had to plague her on every project.

Meanwhile, I was sitting next to her working on computer software, which for any project of reasonable size includes tracking thousands of details. Among those details are defects, bugs, and any team with any hope of success uses a bug tracker system to keep them documented. The most popular, but certainly not the most user-friendly, bug tracker is Bugzilla. I like it a great deal.

SwarmStream: A Next-Generation HTTP Stack for Java - O'Reilly Media (2005) — O'Reilly ONJava.com: The Independent Source for Enterprise Java

Mar 2005

Chief among the sins of Java's built-in HTTP support is its lack of support for automatic retries. Transient errors are a part of computer networking, and requiring developers to handle retries manually has resulted in scores of applications that turn temporary outages or general network hiccups into fatal errors. Just as the built-in HTTP protocol handler will automatically follow a 301 or 307 redirection response code, it is reasonable to expect it to retry a connection when appropriate.

Readings (6)

Peopleware : Productive Projects and Teams

Tom Demarco, Timothy Lister

Reading this early helped me shape a career filled with good jobs in good places. I hope it made working at Swarmcast better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick too.

Debugging

David J Agans

Agans puts down in writing what some people are born known and others figure out over brutal battles with defects. I give this book away regularly and always buy another copy shortly thereafter.

Effective Java (2nd Edition)

Joshua Bloch

This is another of those books that restores your faith in your fellow developers. Besides being filled with great advice, the fact that it's so well reputed and so frequently read, is encouraging because it reminds you no matter how horrible the code you might be looking at now is, that some people want to and do write better stuff.

Programming in Scala: A Comprehensive Step-by-step Guide

Martin Odersky, Lex Spoon, Bill Venners

I made the mistake of reading some other Scala books first, on the wrongheaded assumption that a good language designer probably slapped together a second rate book that was expected to sell just because the author also wrote Scala. I was wrong. This has better sequencing of concepts that most "here's a new language" books and excellent theoretical foundations to boot.

The Soul of A New Machine

Tracy Kidder

I didn't read this until I'd been through my first do-or-die software project and it was amazing to see how closely the team Kidder describes aligned with my experiences. It's all the more amazing that Kidder came in with no technical expertise. It's my hope to someday get my wife to read this so she'll understand why I keep throwing myself back into the maelstrom; thus far she's unconvinced.

1 more

Tools

First computer TRS-80 Color Computer
Favorite editor vim

Others

Background

Background

You've probably noticed that I've got a four in my first name. Covering the standard questions: It's not a typo. It is legal, and it's silent when pronounced.

I added the four 20 years ago for what seemed like good reasons at the time. I'm still quite fond of it even if it does make every aspect of my life very easy to google.

Ry4an Brase

Ann Arbor, MI, United States https://ry4an.org

Technical Skills

Likes: http python amazon-web-services mercurial apache linux vi java
Dislikes: windows gui soap

Experience

Aug 2016 → Current Principal Software Engineer Duo Security
aws, python, security, ansible

Developer-y operations or operations-y developer.

Jul 2012 → Jul 2016 VP, Engineering DramaFever
python, django, amazon-web-services, amazon-redshift, nginx, git, jenkins, postgresql, mysql

Manage a team of 40, reporting to the CEO with direct involvement in: - Developing customer facing and backend features on a Django + JS stack - Increased search effiency by implementing Swiftype for in-site search and autocomplete - Built "big data" video analytics system with millions of data points per day analyzed using Amazon DyanamoDB, Elastic Map Reduce (Hadoop / Hive), and Redshift cutting reporting time from days to minutes - Helping build-out processes and tooling with GitHub, standard branching practices, continuous integration (Jenkins), IRC, and code review - Increasing monitoring with New Relic and Graphite - Working on improved streaming video over Akamai with HLS - Set top box / smart TV development for Panasonic, LG, and Samsung

Apr 2011 → Jul 2012 Software Developer 8thBridge
scala, amazon-ec2, chef, mongodb, couchdb, rabbitmq, jetty, linux, java
  • Debugging and developing software for high-volume, high-reliability transaction processing with highly variable input and data store requirements
  • Conduting code reviews for security and correctness using GitHub and JIRA/Crucible
  • Helping to manage large Amazon EC2 deployments using Chef for automation and Jenkins for builds and deploys
  • Using NewRelic, Cacti, Graphite, Splunk, Snort, Pingdom, Akamai, Cloud Front, PagerDuty,and BrowserMob to ensure always-on availability
  • Primary point of contact for PCI-DSS certification -- one of the first on Amazon Web Services / Elastic Computing Cloud (AWS-EC2)
2010 → 2011 Software Developer University of Minnesota - Supercomputing Institute
linux, python, bioinformatics, galaxy, mpi, c++, apache, perl, amazon-web-services, puppet

I help researchers with varying degrees of technical experience to use our computing infrastructure to further their research goals. I work with multiple research teams at a time who, when they initially contact us, can have as little as a partially written grant proposal or as much as some code which needs help to achieve greater parallelization on our massively multi-core systems.

The variety of academic field, technologies, and roles affords me great opportunities to exercise a diverse set of skills both technical and managerial. Just recently my efforts have included:

  • code review (Perl, Python, C++, Java)
  • security audit (CSS, CSRF, Perl, Apache)
  • release planning and management (Mercurial, Basecamp, status reports, formal release approval)
  • academic / technical liaison (grant writing
  • system specification and configuration (Linux, Apache, Python/Paste)

Working simultaneously on multiple projects for researchers to whom I don't report organizationally has honed by my communication and scheduling skills as I balance my time expenditures to align with project needs and fractional support from multiple grants.

One of many recent projects has been the specification, installation, configuration, and management of the Galaxy genomics / bioinformatics platform at the UMN. As lead technical resource on this project I set up the initial proof of concept, provided training for researchers and fellow developers, authored release procedures, and supervised the technical-side of a university wide roll out.

2002 → 2010 Director of Development, Co-founder Swarmcast, Inc.
java, http, apache, jetty, squid, varnish, rfc2616, goovy, amazon-ec2, amazon-s3

Built a team of 15 engineers from the ground up, and set their goals, selected their tools, crafted their environment, defined their procedures, and oversaw quality. Reliably delivered customer-facing software with a resalable product focus on time and under budget. Wrote a fair fraction of it too.

Oversaw processional services groups in North America, Europe, and Asia. Tasks included project scheduling, resource allocation, and international travel.

Managed the patent process, including 13 provisional patents filed in the US and as PCT. Two fully granted with the rest still pending.

1995 → 2002 Software Developer / Team Lead Others
java, perl, linux, tomcat, jetty, cgi, http

This is a placeholder position to show that I've been around for awhile. Look at the last fifteen years for the interesting stuff.

Education

1995 → 2000 B.S. Computer Science University of Minnesota
networking, algorithms, computer-architecture, software-engineering
  • Student research assistant
  • Institute of Technology Honors Student
  • Association of Computing Machinery chapter vice-president

Projects & Interests

Sep 2008 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/8992/ry4an-brase
Written 1077 answers. Active in mercurial, merge, tortoisehg, version-control, bitbucket and 28 other tags.
Jul 2013 → Current occupied https://github.com/Ry4an/occupied
go, google-app-engine

Fun little mini-project using Twine + go + App Engine

I created this mini hardware + software project to display the availability of our office bathrooms on the web. There's a full writeup on my blog.

Nov 2011 → Current dircproxy https://github.com/Ry4an/dircproxy
c, irc, gdb

dircproxy is an IRC proxy server ("bouncer") designed for people who use IRC from lots of different workstations or clients, but wish to remain connected and see what they missed while they were away. You connect to IRC through dircproxy, and it keeps you connected to the server, even after you detach your client from it. While you're detached, it logs channel and private messages as well as important events, and when you reattach it'll let you know what you missed. Join us on IRC: irc.freenode.net #dircproxy

Found and fixed some IPC problems in a forked DNS resolver's memory handling.

Public Artifacts

The Wedding Planned With Bugzilla (2006) — Ry4an.org http://ry4an.org/unblog/post/2006-10-27/

For years I'd watched an event planner who worked out of the same coffee shop I did practice her trade. So nearly as I could tell she lived entirely in a world of post-it notes and phone calls. On any given day I'd watch 500 different pieces of information flit before her mental windshield with no discernible organizational system I could recognize. It drove me crazy. I wanted to offer to help her come up with a computer based solution that would patch all the holes in her process I was sure had to plague her on every project.

Meanwhile, I was sitting next to her working on computer software, which for any project of reasonable size includes tracking thousands of details. Among those details are defects, bugs, and any team with any hope of success uses a bug tracker system to keep them documented. The most popular, but certainly not the most user-friendly, bug tracker is Bugzilla. I like it a great deal.

Automatic SSH Tunnel Home As Securely As I Can — Ry4an.org http://ry4an.org/unblog/post/ssh_lojack/

After watching a video from Defcon 18 and seeing a tweet from Steve Losh I decided to finally set up an automatic SSH tunnel from my home server to my traveling laptop.

Mar 2005 SwarmStream: A Next-Generation HTTP Stack for Java - O'Reilly Media (2005) — O'Reilly ONJava.com: The Independent Source for Enterprise Java http://onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2005/03/16/swarmstream.html

Chief among the sins of Java's built-in HTTP support is its lack of support for automatic retries. Transient errors are a part of computer networking, and requiring developers to handle retries manually has resulted in scores of applications that turn temporary outages or general network hiccups into fatal errors. Just as the built-in HTTP protocol handler will automatically follow a 301 or 307 redirection response code, it is reasonable to expect it to retry a connection when appropriate.

Others

Background Background

You've probably noticed that I've got a four in my first name. Covering the standard questions: It's not a typo. It is legal, and it's silent when pronounced.

I added the four 20 years ago for what seemed like good reasons at the time. I'm still quite fond of it even if it does make every aspect of my life very easy to google.

Readings

Peopleware : Productive Projects and Teams Tom Demarco, Timothy Lister http://www.amazon.com/Peopleware-Productive-Projects-Tom-Demarco/dp/0932633056%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0932633056

Reading this early helped me shape a career filled with good jobs in good places. I hope it made working at Swarmcast better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick too.

Debugging David J Agans http://www.amazon.com/Debugging-David-J-Agans/dp/0814474578%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0814474578

Agans puts down in writing what some people are born known and others figure out over brutal battles with defects. I give this book away regularly and always buy another copy shortly thereafter.

Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution Steven Levy, Steven Levy http://www.amazon.com/Hackers-Computer-Revolution-Steven-Levy/dp/B000HD1OUK%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3DB000HD1OUK

This is the book that let me know my abnormal fascination with computers, technology, and software at age 11 was going to be okay.

Effective Java (2nd Edition) Joshua Bloch http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Java-2nd-Joshua-Bloch/dp/0321356683%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321356683

This is another of those books that restores your faith in your fellow developers. Besides being filled with great advice, the fact that it's so well reputed and so frequently read, is encouraging because it reminds you no matter how horrible the code you might be looking at now is, that some people want to and do write better stuff.

Programming in Scala: A Comprehensive Step-by-step Guide Martin Odersky, Lex Spoon, Bill Venners http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Scala-Comprehensive-Step-step/dp/0981531601%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0981531601

I made the mistake of reading some other Scala books first, on the wrongheaded assumption that a good language designer probably slapped together a second rate book that was expected to sell just because the author also wrote Scala. I was wrong. This has better sequencing of concepts that most "here's a new language" books and excellent theoretical foundations to boot.

The Soul of A New Machine Tracy Kidder http://www.amazon.com/Soul-New-Machine-Tracy-Kidder/dp/0316491977%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0316491977

I didn't read this until I'd been through my first do-or-die software project and it was amazing to see how closely the team Kidder describes aligned with my experiences. It's all the more amazing that Kidder came in with no technical expertise. It's my hope to someday get my wife to read this so she'll understand why I keep throwing myself back into the maelstrom; thus far she's unconvinced.

Tools

First Computer: TRS-80 Color Computer
Favorite Editor: vim