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Sven Amann

Software Quality Consultant

Darmstadt, Germany
github.com/salsolatragus
Last seen on Stack Overflow today

Technologies

Preferred technologies
Top Percentiles
Top 20%

Experience

Developer & Software Quality Consultant

CQSE GmbH

Oct 2018 → Current (2 months)

I'm a developer of Teamscale and related tooling. I support software development teams in monitoring and continuously improving their code quality and tests.

Software Developer

Laborgenossenschaft Darmstadt e.G.

Oct 2010 → Jan 2017 (6 years, 4 months)

Developer in a small Scrum team, working on the LabCONN2 system. LabCONN2 facilitates data exchange between surgeries and laboratories. I originally started as the team's Product Owner, but switched roles with a teammate when I participated in a student exchange.

Student Assistant

Software AG

Oct 2006 → Mar 2009 (2 years, 6 months)

I worked on an Application Designer used to create web-based interfaces for Service-Oriented Architectures. I participated in the development of new features, maintenance, and customer service.

Education

PhD

Technische Universität Darmstadt

May 2013 → Sep 2018

I'm the project lead of MuBench and MuDetect. My work is partly funded by the IT-Project-Leadership Program "Software Campus". I'm a member of the program committees of the MSR'17 Mining Challenge and SANER'17.

Master of Science, Computer Science

Technische Universität Darmstadt

2009 → 2013

Master of Science, Computer Science

Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro

Jan 2013 → Jul 2013

Bachelor of Science, Computer Science

Technische Universität Darmstadt

2006 → 2009

Open Source

MuBench

Nov 2015 → Current (3 years, 1 month)

MuBench is an automated benchmarking pipeline for API-misuse detectors, such as MuDetect, GrouMiner, JADET, Tikanga, or DMMC.

KaVE (C#)

Jul 2014 → Nov 2016 (2 years, 5 months)

A user-interaction tracker and intelligent code completion for VisualStudio/C#.

I'm a core committer to this project, almost from day one.

Stack Exchange

Community Name
Reputation

Public Artifacts (25)

Lessons Learned from Bad API Design

Oct 2018

Software libraries and their Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are essential for proper code reuse that leads to faster software development and less software bugs. However, a poorly designed API can end up causing more harm than good: clients of the API may incorrectly use certain functionality leading to runtime failures, performance degradations, or security issues.

Docker for Cross-platform Research Prototypes

Jan 2018

I use Docker to provide a platform-independent, ready-to-use environment for my research prototypes. Reduce setup time, faster CI, and did I say platform-independent?

Just Use My Testing Infrastructure

Sep 2017

I try to make using my (test) code as easy as possible. Makes it more likely people actually use it!

About Assumptions

Jul 2017

Implicit assumptions may cause much confusion and miscommunication. Conversely, sometimes, it’s making them explicit what helps others the most when we try to explain something, be it in a talk, a lecture, a discussion, or in a scientific publication.

Naming Tests

Jun 2017

Recently, I received an email from a former student assistant of mine, who observed that I name tests different today, compared to when we were working together some years ago. He was curious to learn what guidelines I’m following now and what led me to them. Let me try to recap.

Legacy Code Retreat

May 2017

Where does legacy code come from? What is legacy code, anyway? Why should we care about it? Can we make it go away? How? Can we prevent it from coming back, or even from ever showing up in the first place?

Reuse

May 2017

Did you ever find yourself facing a problem, wishing you had a program to solve it for you? I certainly did. Repeatedly.

The Programmer Peculiarity

Apr 2017

Most people cannot construct a building or write a book, yet, it seems like everybody can program. Isn't that peculiar?

Inadvertent Prudent Technical Debt

Apr 2017

I recently stumbled upon a great talk by Martin Flower about Technical Debt. In the talk, he first classifies technical debt according to whether you are aware of taking it up (deliberate) or not (inadvertent). Then he also classifies it according to whether you do so as the result of an informed decision (prudent) or because you don’t care (reckless). From these two dimensions Martin forms a classification, separating four categories of technical debt.

Being Bad With Names

Apr 2017

I'm bad with names. Sometimes, when somebody tells me his name, I catch myself having forgotten about it literally in the next sentence. I've tried some techniques to prevent this from happening - such as immediately repeating the name several times in my head or using phrases like "Nice to meet you, NAME" to repeat them out loud. These help, but I still find it difficult.

To Agile or To(o) Lean

Apr 2017

Research is agile. Not only in its software development, but in its entirety. Simply because one rarely knows where it's going next. Research is, by its very definition, explorative. You have a problem, come up with possible solutions, implement the best, evaluate it, and either continue or backtrack. Adapt to change (new insights). Improve iteratively.

Unsustainable Pace

Mar 2017

Early in my PhD, attending my first conference, in fact, I stated that I usually don't work on weekends and public holidays. Several jaws dropped. "How do you ever want to finish your PhD?," I was asked.

Adam and the Tests

Mar 2017

A strong set of tests gives me confidence that the tools I devise do what I want them to do and that my experiments test what I intend them to test. This is crucial to my research. If I wouldn't have this confidence, how could I publish the results of my experiments, claiming that I found a better solution to the problem I'm working on?

How I Came to Test

Feb 2017

As you might remember, academics code, too. And that's not even only computer scientists: The first of my friends who needed to program in university were physicists. Early on, they had to evaluate the results of their lab experiments, which produced considerable amounts of output. Too much, certainly, for any sane human to process. And since respective software was simply unaffordable, they would go a write their evaluation scripts themselves. Of course, most of them were self-taught amateurs at the time. They didn't have any courses about programming, testing, design, or even version control.

Is TDD Just Unit-Test Waste?

Feb 2017

In early 2014, Cope published an article titled "Why Most Unit Testing Is Waste" and little later a follow up. In these articles, Cope states that unit testing, i.e., testing of individual functions, targets the wrong level of granularity for object-oriented software and will only every cover a very small subset of the actual state space, therefore, finding only few bugs. Worse, splitting functions solely for the sake of testability destroys the design. Tests (or test coverage) should never become a primary goal.

TDD vs. Architecture

Feb 2017

In 2007, Robert C. Martin (Uncle Bob) and James O. Coplien (Cope) had a discussion about TDD at the JAOO Conference. Uncle Bob opened the discussion proclaiming that it has become infeasible for a professional developer not to practice TDD. Cope, on the other hand, states that he has adopted a very strong position against what, in particular, the XP community calls TDD and absolutely rejects Uncle Bob's thesis.

The Dawn of TDD

Jan 2017

Young and unexperienced our art is and unique properties it has.

eXtreme Researching (XR)

Jan 2017

I'm an academic. I've never had a full-time developer job in my life. Yet, I write and screencast about software development. Why the heck should you care to listen to me?

Test Jekyll Builds

Jan 2017

When I recently set up a Travis build for my website, I came across several sources mentioning automated testing of Jekyll pages. Of course that got me curious. After all, what's CI without test? Part of what I ended up adding to my site's build is from an article by Jacob Tomlinson. I'll repeat those parts that I found useful and add my additional insights while I go along.

Edit a Jekyll Website from iOS

Dec 2016

A while ago, I moved my website and blog to Jekyll. Good decision. No more Wordpress vulnerabilities, less bling bling, more control. Only drawback: I can no longer blog from my tablet. Well... I couldn't. Here comes my first Jekyll post from my iPad.

Intercultural Awareness

Oct 2016

Last week, I had the chance to sharpen my “Intercultural Awareness” in a 2-day training, organized by SAP and Software Campus. Our coach was Melissa Lamson, who made the training an awesome experience, as she happily shared her knowledge and experience with us.

Mob Programming @ETFFM16

Mar 2016

Today, I ran an experiment. I formed a mob of conference participants and let them program an MVP of the POS Kata in (8 * 3 =) 24 min. This high-speed mob programming turned out to be…

I stayed to #OnAgile | Let's Developer

May 2015

Agile without the right mindset and practices leads to building big balls of mud. - Declan Whelan, wrapping up OnAgile 2015 Today, I had the chance to go to my very first virtual conference -- the…

Legacy Code Retreat

Mar 2015

In the beginning of this year, I decided to organize a code retreat. A little later Simone Bächle pointed me at jbrains' lovely example of a messed up trivia-game implementation and the idea of a…

View more public artifacts

Readings (9)

We Tried Baseball and It Didn't Work

This is RonJeffries.com, the combination of new articles, XProgramming, SameElephant, and perhaps even some new items never before contemplated.
Copyright © 1998-2015 Ronald E Jeffries

4 more

Tools

Favorite editor TextMate

Sven Amann

Darmstadt, Germany http://www.sven-amann.de

Technical Skills

Likes: testing agile-processes continuous-integration project-management tdd pair-programming

Experience

Oct 2018 → Current Developer & Software Quality Consultant CQSE GmbH

I'm a developer of Teamscale and related tooling. I support software development teams in monitoring and continuously improving their code quality and tests.

Oct 2010 → Jan 2017 Software Developer Laborgenossenschaft Darmstadt e.G.
java, mockito, hibernate, dependency-injection, fest, swing, jasper-reports, jenkins, maven

Developer in a small Scrum team, working on the LabCONN2 system. LabCONN2 facilitates data exchange between surgeries and laboratories. I originally started as the team's Product Owner, but switched roles with a teammate when I participated in a student exchange.

Oct 2006 → Mar 2009 Student Assistant Software AG
java, javascript, swt

I worked on an Application Designer used to create web-based interfaces for Service-Oriented Architectures. I participated in the development of new features, maintenance, and customer service.

Education

May 2013 → Sep 2018 PhD Technische Universität Darmstadt

I'm the project lead of MuBench and MuDetect. My work is partly funded by the IT-Project-Leadership Program "Software Campus". I'm a member of the program committees of the MSR'17 Mining Challenge and SANER'17.

2009 → 2013 Master of Science, Computer Science Technische Universität Darmstadt
Jan 2013 → Jul 2013 Master of Science, Computer Science Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro
2006 → 2009 Bachelor of Science, Computer Science Technische Universität Darmstadt

Projects & Interests

May 2012 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/1372671/sven-amann
Written 21 answers. Active in java.
Nov 2015 → Current MuBench http://github.com/stg-tud/MUBench
java, python, python-3.x, php, docker

MuBench is an automated benchmarking pipeline for API-misuse detectors, such as MuDetect, GrouMiner, JADET, Tikanga, or DMMC.

Jul 2014 → Nov 2016 KaVE (C#) https://github.com/stg-tud/kave
c#

A user-interaction tracker and intelligent code completion for VisualStudio/C#.

I'm a core committer to this project, almost from day one.

Public Artifacts

Oct 2018 Lessons Learned from Bad API Design http://blog.ieeesoftware.org/2018/10/lessons-learned-from-bad-api-design.html

Software libraries and their Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are essential for proper code reuse that leads to faster software development and less software bugs. However, a poorly designed API can end up causing more harm than good: clients of the API may incorrectly use certain functionality leading to runtime failures, performance degradations, or security issues.

Jan 2018 Docker for Cross-platform Research Prototypes http://academicscode.com/posts/2018/01/docker-for-cross-platform-prototypes/
docker, shell, batch-file

I use Docker to provide a platform-independent, ready-to-use environment for my research prototypes. Reduce setup time, faster CI, and did I say platform-independent?

Sep 2017 Just Use My Testing Infrastructure http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/09/just-use-my-testing-infrastructure/
maven, maven-jar-plugin, testing, dependencies

I try to make using my (test) code as easy as possible. Makes it more likely people actually use it!

Jul 2017 About Assumptions http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/07/about-assumptions/

Implicit assumptions may cause much confusion and miscommunication. Conversely, sometimes, it’s making them explicit what helps others the most when we try to explain something, be it in a talk, a lecture, a discussion, or in a scientific publication.

Jun 2017 Naming Tests http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/06/naming-tests/

Recently, I received an email from a former student assistant of mine, who observed that I name tests different today, compared to when we were working together some years ago. He was curious to learn what guidelines I’m following now and what led me to them. Let me try to recap.

May 2017 Legacy Code Retreat http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/05/legacy-code-retreat/

Where does legacy code come from? What is legacy code, anyway? Why should we care about it? Can we make it go away? How? Can we prevent it from coming back, or even from ever showing up in the first place?

May 2017 Reuse http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/05/reuse/

Did you ever find yourself facing a problem, wishing you had a program to solve it for you? I certainly did. Repeatedly.

Apr 2017 The Programmer Peculiarity http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/04/the-programming-peculiarity/

Most people cannot construct a building or write a book, yet, it seems like everybody can program. Isn't that peculiar?

Apr 2017 Inadvertent Prudent Technical Debt http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/04/inadvertent-prudent-technical-dept/

I recently stumbled upon a great talk by Martin Flower about Technical Debt. In the talk, he first classifies technical debt according to whether you are aware of taking it up (deliberate) or not (inadvertent). Then he also classifies it according to whether you do so as the result of an informed decision (prudent) or because you don’t care (reckless). From these two dimensions Martin forms a classification, separating four categories of technical debt.

Apr 2017 Being Bad With Names http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/04/bad-with-names/

I'm bad with names. Sometimes, when somebody tells me his name, I catch myself having forgotten about it literally in the next sentence. I've tried some techniques to prevent this from happening - such as immediately repeating the name several times in my head or using phrases like "Nice to meet you, NAME" to repeat them out loud. These help, but I still find it difficult.

Apr 2017 To Agile or To(o) Lean http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/04/to-agile-or-too-lean/

Research is agile. Not only in its software development, but in its entirety. Simply because one rarely knows where it's going next. Research is, by its very definition, explorative. You have a problem, come up with possible solutions, implement the best, evaluate it, and either continue or backtrack. Adapt to change (new insights). Improve iteratively.

Mar 2017 Unsustainable Pace http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/03/unsustainable-pace/

Early in my PhD, attending my first conference, in fact, I stated that I usually don't work on weekends and public holidays. Several jaws dropped. "How do you ever want to finish your PhD?," I was asked.

Mar 2017 Academics Code Only Prototypes http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/03/academics-code-only-prototypes/

"Academic code is like startup code, only we don't claim its production ready." ~A speaker at the 33C3

Mar 2017 Adam and the Tests http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/03/adam-and-tests/

A strong set of tests gives me confidence that the tools I devise do what I want them to do and that my experiments test what I intend them to test. This is crucial to my research. If I wouldn't have this confidence, how could I publish the results of my experiments, claiming that I found a better solution to the problem I'm working on?

Feb 2017 How I Came to Test http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/02/how-I-came-to-test/

As you might remember, academics code, too. And that's not even only computer scientists: The first of my friends who needed to program in university were physicists. Early on, they had to evaluate the results of their lab experiments, which produced considerable amounts of output. Too much, certainly, for any sane human to process. And since respective software was simply unaffordable, they would go a write their evaluation scripts themselves. Of course, most of them were self-taught amateurs at the time. They didn't have any courses about programming, testing, design, or even version control.

Feb 2017 Is TDD Just Unit-Test Waste? http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/02/a-little-history-of-tdd-unit-test-waste/

In early 2014, Cope published an article titled "Why Most Unit Testing Is Waste" and little later a follow up. In these articles, Cope states that unit testing, i.e., testing of individual functions, targets the wrong level of granularity for object-oriented software and will only every cover a very small subset of the actual state space, therefore, finding only few bugs. Worse, splitting functions solely for the sake of testability destroys the design. Tests (or test coverage) should never become a primary goal.

Feb 2017 TDD vs. Architecture http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/02/a-little-history-of-tdd-tdd-vs-architecture/

In 2007, Robert C. Martin (Uncle Bob) and James O. Coplien (Cope) had a discussion about TDD at the JAOO Conference. Uncle Bob opened the discussion proclaiming that it has become infeasible for a professional developer not to practice TDD. Cope, on the other hand, states that he has adopted a very strong position against what, in particular, the XP community calls TDD and absolutely rejects Uncle Bob's thesis.

Jan 2017 The Dawn of TDD http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/01/a-little-history-of-tdd-dawn-of-tdd/

Young and unexperienced our art is and unique properties it has.

Jan 2017 eXtreme Researching (XR) http://academicscode.com/posts/2017/01/extreme-researching/

I'm an academic. I've never had a full-time developer job in my life. Yet, I write and screencast about software development. Why the heck should you care to listen to me?

Jan 2017 Test Jekyll Builds http://sven-amann.de/blog/2017/01/test-jekyll-builds/
continuous-testing, travis-ci, jekyll, github

When I recently set up a Travis build for my website, I came across several sources mentioning automated testing of Jekyll pages. Of course that got me curious. After all, what's CI without test? Part of what I ended up adding to my site's build is from an article by Jacob Tomlinson. I'll repeat those parts that I found useful and add my additional insights while I go along.

Dec 2016 Edit a Jekyll Website from iOS http://sven-amann.de/blog/2016/12/jekyll-post-from-ios/
jekyll, travis-ci, github, ios, continuous-deployment

A while ago, I moved my website and blog to Jekyll. Good decision. No more Wordpress vulnerabilities, less bling bling, more control. Only drawback: I can no longer blog from my tablet. Well... I couldn't. Here comes my first Jekyll post from my iPad.

Oct 2016 Intercultural Awareness http://sven-amann.de/blog/2016/10/intercultural-awareness/

Last week, I had the chance to sharpen my “Intercultural Awareness” in a 2-day training, organized by SAP and Software Campus. Our coach was Melissa Lamson, who made the training an awesome experience, as she happily shared her knowledge and experience with us.

Mar 2016 Mob Programming @ETFFM16 http://sven-amann.de/blog/2016/03/etffm16-mob-programming/

Today, I ran an experiment. I formed a mob of conference participants and let them program an MVP of the POS Kata in (8 * 3 =) 24 min. This high-speed mob programming turned out to be…

May 2015 I stayed to #OnAgile | Let's Developer http://letsdeveloper.com/2015/05/i-stayed-to-onagile/

Agile without the right mindset and practices leads to building big balls of mud. - Declan Whelan, wrapping up OnAgile 2015 Today, I had the chance to go to my very first virtual conference -- the…

Mar 2015 Legacy Code Retreat http://letsdeveloper.com/2015/03/1st-darmstadter-legacy-code-retreat/

In the beginning of this year, I decided to organize a code retreat. A little later Simone Bächle pointed me at jbrains' lovely example of a messed up trivia-game implementation and the idea of a…

Readings

Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship Robert C. Martin http://www.amazon.com/Clean-Code-Handbook-Software-Craftsmanship/dp/0132350882%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0132350882
Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices Robert C. Martin http://www.amazon.com/Software-Development-Principles-Patterns-Practices/dp/0135974445%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0135974445
Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition Steve Krug http://www.amazon.com/Dont-Make-Me-Think-Usability/dp/0321344758%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0321344758
Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, John Brant, William Opdyke, Don Roberts http://www.amazon.com/Refactoring-Improving-Design-Existing-Code/dp/0201485672%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0201485672
Manage Your Project Portfolio: Increase Your Capacity and Finish More Projects (Pragmatic Programmers) Johanna Rothman http://www.amazon.com/Manage-Your-Project-Portfolio-Programmers/dp/1934356298
We Tried Baseball and It Didn't Work http://ronjeffries.com/xprog/articles/jatbaseball/

This is RonJeffries.com, the combination of new articles, XProgramming, SameElephant, and perhaps even some new items never before contemplated.
Copyright © 1998-2015 Ronald E Jeffries

Putting An Age-Old Battle To Rest - The Code Whisperer http://blog.thecodewhisperer.com/permalink/putting-an-age-old-battle-to-rest

Putting An Age-Old Battle To Rest December 7, 2013 Improving Names Comments So maybe not an epic, age-old battle, but a battle nonetheless. The bat...

How Test-driven Development Works (and More!) Joe Rainsberger (jbrains) http://blog.jbrains.ca/permalink/how-test-driven-development-works-and-more

Discusses how test-first development and test-driven development are founded in the queuing theory.

Slack: Getting Past Burnout, Busywork, and the Myth of Total Efficiency Tom DeMarco https://books.google.de/books/about/Slack.html?id=563gvssRPvkC

Good read on why you shouldn't work over hours and why becoming more productive is about doing less.

Tools

Favorite Editor: TextMate