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2 edited body
source | link

I'm not sure why you have the if/else block in the catch and isntanceofinstanceof, I think you can do what you want with:-

catch( ProcessExecutionException ex )
{
   // handle ProcessExecutionException
}
catch( InterruptException ex )
{
   // handler InterruptException*
}

One thing to consider, to reduce clutter, is to catch the exception inside your callable method and re-throw as your own domain/package specific exception or exceptions. How many exceptionexceptions you need to create would largely depend on how your calling code will respond to the exception.

I'm not sure why you have the if/else block in the catch and isntanceof, I think you can do what you want with:-

catch( ProcessExecutionException ex )
{
   // handle ProcessExecutionException
}
catch( InterruptException ex )
{
   // handler InterruptException*
}

One thing to consider, to reduce clutter, is to catch the exception inside your callable method and re-throw as your own domain/package specific exception or exceptions. How many exception you need to create would largely depend on how your calling code will respond to the exception.

I'm not sure why you have the if/else block in the catch and instanceof, I think you can do what you want with:-

catch( ProcessExecutionException ex )
{
   // handle ProcessExecutionException
}
catch( InterruptException ex )
{
   // handler InterruptException*
}

One thing to consider, to reduce clutter, is to catch the exception inside your callable method and re-throw as your own domain/package specific exception or exceptions. How many exceptions you need to create would largely depend on how your calling code will respond to the exception.

1
source | link

I'm not sure why you have the if/else block in the catch and isntanceof, I think you can do what you want with:-

catch( ProcessExecutionException ex )
{
   // handle ProcessExecutionException
}
catch( InterruptException ex )
{
   // handler InterruptException*
}

One thing to consider, to reduce clutter, is to catch the exception inside your callable method and re-throw as your own domain/package specific exception or exceptions. How many exception you need to create would largely depend on how your calling code will respond to the exception.