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To make sure that the first value it encounters is exactly the value you want, you need to apply a GROUP BYGROUP BY to an ordered query, hence the need to resor usinguse a subquery. You can't do it without resortingotherwise.

The accepted answer on the other question

The accepted answer on the other question doesn't look correct at allaccepted answer on the other question looks wrong to me. I think this is wrong:

(if you areIf you're sure that IDID is alwaysonly increasing, and if ID1>ID2ID1 > ID2 also means that post_date1>post_date2post_date1 > post_date2, then the query could be made much more simple, but I amI'm not sure if this is the case).

To make sure that the first value it encounters is exactly the value you want, you need to apply a GROUP BY to an ordered query, hence the need to resor using a subquery. You can't do it without resorting.

The accepted answer on the other question

The accepted answer on the other question doesn't look correct at all to me. I think this is wrong:

(if you are sure that ID is always increasing, and if ID1>ID2 also means that post_date1>post_date2 the query could be made much more simple, but I am not sure if this is the case).

To make sure that the first value it encounters is exactly the value you want, you need to apply a GROUP BY to an ordered query, hence the need to use a subquery. You can't do it otherwise.

The accepted answer on the other question looks wrong to me:

(If you're sure that ID is only increasing, and if ID1 > ID2 also means that post_date1 > post_date2, then the query could be made much more simple, but I'm not sure if this is the case).

4 added 1685 characters in body
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ButIf you need to extract all the flowers that are the only flowers in the garder instead, you could just change the HAVING condition to HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT flower)=1, orbut MySql also allows you to use this:

So, if this trick works, it's just a matter of luck.

The accepted answer on the other question

The accepted answer on the other question doesn't look correct at all to me. I think this is wrong:

HAVING wp_posts.post_date = MAX(wp_posts.post_date)

wp_posts.post_date is a non-aggregated column, and its value will be officially undetermined, but it will likely be the first post_date encountered. But since the GROUP BY trick is applied to an unordered table, it is not sure which is the first post_date encountered.

It will probably returns posts that are the only posts of a single author, but even this is not always certain.

A possible solution

I think that this could be a possible solution:

SELECT wp_posts.*
FROM   wp_posts
WHERE  id IN (
  SELECT max(id)
  FROM wp_posts
  WHERE (post_author, post_date) = (
    SELECT   post_author, max(post_date)
    FROM     wp_posts
    WHERE    wp_posts.post_status='publish'
             AND wp_posts.post_type='post'
    GROUP BY post_author
  ) AND wp_posts.post_status='publish'
    AND wp_posts.post_type='post'
  GROUP BY post_author
)

On the inner query I'm returning the maximum post date for every author. I'm then taking into consideration the fact that the same author could theorically have two posts at the same time, so I'm getting only the maximum ID. And then I'm returning all rows that have those maximum IDs. It could be made faster using joins instead of IN clause.

(if you are sure that ID is always increasing, and if ID1>ID2 also means that post_date1>post_date2 the query could be made much more simple, but I am not sure if this is the case).

But you need to extract all the flowers that are the only flowers in the garder, you could just change the HAVING condition to HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT flower)=1, or MySql also allows you to use this:

So, if this trick works, it's just a matter of luck.

If you need to extract all the flowers that are the only flowers in the garder instead, you could just change the HAVING condition to HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT flower)=1, but MySql also allows you to use this:

So, if this trick works, it's just a matter of luck.

The accepted answer on the other question

The accepted answer on the other question doesn't look correct at all to me. I think this is wrong:

HAVING wp_posts.post_date = MAX(wp_posts.post_date)

wp_posts.post_date is a non-aggregated column, and its value will be officially undetermined, but it will likely be the first post_date encountered. But since the GROUP BY trick is applied to an unordered table, it is not sure which is the first post_date encountered.

It will probably returns posts that are the only posts of a single author, but even this is not always certain.

A possible solution

I think that this could be a possible solution:

SELECT wp_posts.*
FROM   wp_posts
WHERE  id IN (
  SELECT max(id)
  FROM wp_posts
  WHERE (post_author, post_date) = (
    SELECT   post_author, max(post_date)
    FROM     wp_posts
    WHERE    wp_posts.post_status='publish'
             AND wp_posts.post_type='post'
    GROUP BY post_author
  ) AND wp_posts.post_status='publish'
    AND wp_posts.post_type='post'
  GROUP BY post_author
)

On the inner query I'm returning the maximum post date for every author. I'm then taking into consideration the fact that the same author could theorically have two posts at the same time, so I'm getting only the maximum ID. And then I'm returning all rows that have those maximum IDs. It could be made faster using joins instead of IN clause.

(if you are sure that ID is always increasing, and if ID1>ID2 also means that post_date1>post_date2 the query could be made much more simple, but I am not sure if this is the case).

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