7 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yield an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answersthis question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yield an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yield an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

6 Fixed grammar
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Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yeldyield an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

Note that the for (auto&& elem : container) syntax works also works in the other cases of ordinary (non-proxy) iterators (e.g. for a vector<int> or a vector<string>).

Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yeld an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

Note that the for (auto&& elem : container) syntax works also in the other cases of ordinary (non-proxy) iterators (e.g. for a vector<int> or a vector<string>).

Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yield an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

Note that the for (auto&& elem : container) syntax also works in the other cases of ordinary (non-proxy) iterators (e.g. for a vector<int> or a vector<string>).

5 Added notes on generic code.
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  1. For observing the elements, use:

    for (const auto& elem : container)
    
  2. For modifying the elements in-place place, use:

    for (auto&& elem : container)
    
  1. For observing the elements, use:

    for (const auto& elem : container)
    
  2. For modifying the elements in-place, use:

    for (auto&& elem : container)
    
  1. For observing the elements, use:

    for (const auto& elem : container)
    
  2. For modifying the elements in place, use:

    for (auto&& elem : container)
    
4 Added notes on generic code.
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3 Added local-copy case, and some code fixing.
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2 added 3 characters in body
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1
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