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In the my_modules folder, add a __init__.py file to make it a proper package. In that file, you can inject the globals of each of those modules in the global scope of the __init__.py file, which makes them available as your module is imported (after you've also added the name of the global to the __all__ variable):

__all__ = []

import sys
import pkgutil
import inspect

for loader, name, is_pkg in pkgutil.walk_packages(__path__):
    module = loader.find_module(name).load_module(name)

    for name, value in inspect.getmembers(module):
        if name.startswith('__'):
            continue

        globals()[name] = value
        __all__.append(name)

Now, instead of doing:

from my_modules.class1 import Stuff

You can just do:

from my_modules import Stuff

Or to import everything into the global scope, which seems to be what you want to do:

from my_modules import *

The problem with this approach is classes overwrite one another, so if two modules provide Foo, you'll only be able to use the one that was imported last.

In the my_modules folder, add a __init__.py file to make it a proper package. In that file, you can inject the globals of each of those modules in the global scope of the __init__.py file, which makes them available as your module is imported (after you've also added the name of the global to the __all__ variable):

__all__ = []

import sys
import pkgutil
import inspect

for loader, name, is_pkg in pkgutil.walk_packages(__path__):
    module = loader.find_module(name).load_module(name)

    for name, value in inspect.getmembers(module):
        if name.startswith('__'):
            continue

        globals()[name] = value
        __all__.append(name)

Now, instead of doing:

from my_modules.class1 import Stuff

You can just do:

from my_modules import Stuff

Or to import everything into the global scope, which seems to be what you want to do:

from my_modules import *

The problem with this approach is classes overwrite one another, so if two modules provide Foo, you'll only be able to use the one that was imported last.

In the my_modules folder, add a __init__.py file to make it a proper package. In that file, you can inject the globals of each of those modules in the global scope of the __init__.py file, which makes them available as your module is imported (after you've also added the name of the global to the __all__ variable):

__all__ = []

import pkgutil
import inspect

for loader, name, is_pkg in pkgutil.walk_packages(__path__):
    module = loader.find_module(name).load_module(name)

    for name, value in inspect.getmembers(module):
        if name.startswith('__'):
            continue

        globals()[name] = value
        __all__.append(name)

Now, instead of doing:

from my_modules.class1 import Stuff

You can just do:

from my_modules import Stuff

Or to import everything into the global scope, which seems to be what you want to do:

from my_modules import *

The problem with this approach is classes overwrite one another, so if two modules provide Foo, you'll only be able to use the one that was imported last.

1
source | link

In the my_modules folder, add a __init__.py file to make it a proper package. In that file, you can inject the globals of each of those modules in the global scope of the __init__.py file, which makes them available as your module is imported (after you've also added the name of the global to the __all__ variable):

__all__ = []

import sys
import pkgutil
import inspect

for loader, name, is_pkg in pkgutil.walk_packages(__path__):
    module = loader.find_module(name).load_module(name)

    for name, value in inspect.getmembers(module):
        if name.startswith('__'):
            continue

        globals()[name] = value
        __all__.append(name)

Now, instead of doing:

from my_modules.class1 import Stuff

You can just do:

from my_modules import Stuff

Or to import everything into the global scope, which seems to be what you want to do:

from my_modules import *

The problem with this approach is classes overwrite one another, so if two modules provide Foo, you'll only be able to use the one that was imported last.