Use Stack Overflow for Teams at work to find answers in a private and secure environment. Get your first 10 users free. Sign up.
3 Typo in code
source | link

The 'C network library' offers functions to handle endian'ness. Namely htons(), htonl(), ntohs() and ntohl() ...where n is "network" (ie. big-endian) and h is "host" (ie. the endian'ness of the machine running the code).

These apparent 'functions' are (commonly) defined as macros [see <netinet/in.h>], so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The following macros use these 'functions' to evaluate endian'ness.

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#define  IS_BIG_ENDIAN     (1 == htons(1))
#define  IS_LITTLE_ENDIAN  (!IS_BIGIS_BIG_ENDIAN)

In addition:

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability) ...In cases such as these, you may prefer to use the endian functions directly:

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);

The 'C network library' offers functions to handle endian'ness. Namely htons(), htonl(), ntohs() and ntohl() ...where n is "network" (ie. big-endian) and h is "host" (ie. the endian'ness of the machine running the code).

These apparent 'functions' are (commonly) defined as macros [see <netinet/in.h>], so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The following macros use these 'functions' to evaluate endian'ness.

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#define  IS_BIG_ENDIAN     (1 == htons(1))
#define  IS_LITTLE_ENDIAN  (!IS_BIG)

In addition:

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability) ...In cases such as these, you may prefer to use the endian functions directly:

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);

The 'C network library' offers functions to handle endian'ness. Namely htons(), htonl(), ntohs() and ntohl() ...where n is "network" (ie. big-endian) and h is "host" (ie. the endian'ness of the machine running the code).

These apparent 'functions' are (commonly) defined as macros [see <netinet/in.h>], so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The following macros use these 'functions' to evaluate endian'ness.

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#define  IS_BIG_ENDIAN     (1 == htons(1))
#define  IS_LITTLE_ENDIAN  (!IS_BIG_ENDIAN)

In addition:

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability) ...In cases such as these, you may prefer to use the endian functions directly:

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);
2 In respect to Oren's valid criticism, I have prepended detail which addresses the original question more directly.
source | link

The 'C network library' offers functions to handle endian'ness. Namely htons(), htonl(), ntohs() and ntohl() ...where n is "network" (ie. big-endian) and h is "host" (ie. the endian'ness of the machine running the code).

These apparent 'functions' are (commonly) defined as macros [see <netinet/in.h>], so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The following macros use these 'functions' to evaluate endian'ness.

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#define  IS_BIG_ENDIAN     (1 == htons(1))
#define  IS_LITTLE_ENDIAN  (!IS_BIG)

In addition:

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability)  .

If/when this is the case..In cases such as these, you canmay prefer to use the 'C network library'endian functions to ensure your data is big-endian (aka "network order") before you write it.directly:

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);

There IS an equivalent htons() for variables of type 'short' (2 bytes).

There is NO equivalent htonll() for variables of type 'long long' (8 bytes).

There are equivalent ntohs() and ntohl() functions for converting back to 'host' order.

These apparent functions are actually macros (defined in ) so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability).

If/when this is the case, you can use the 'C network library' functions to ensure your data is big-endian (aka "network order") before you write it.

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);

There IS an equivalent htons() for variables of type 'short' (2 bytes).

There is NO equivalent htonll() for variables of type 'long long' (8 bytes).

There are equivalent ntohs() and ntohl() functions for converting back to 'host' order.

These apparent functions are actually macros (defined in ) so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The 'C network library' offers functions to handle endian'ness. Namely htons(), htonl(), ntohs() and ntohl() ...where n is "network" (ie. big-endian) and h is "host" (ie. the endian'ness of the machine running the code).

These apparent 'functions' are (commonly) defined as macros [see <netinet/in.h>], so there is no runtime overhead for using them.

The following macros use these 'functions' to evaluate endian'ness.

#include <arpa/inet.h>
#define  IS_BIG_ENDIAN     (1 == htons(1))
#define  IS_LITTLE_ENDIAN  (!IS_BIG)

In addition:

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability)  ...In cases such as these, you may prefer to use the endian functions directly:

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);
1
source | link

The only time I ever need to know the endian'ness of a system is when I write-out a variable [to a file/other] which may be read-in by another system of unknown endian'ness (for cross-platform compatability).

If/when this is the case, you can use the 'C network library' functions to ensure your data is big-endian (aka "network order") before you write it.

#include <arpa/inet.h>

#define JPEG_MAGIC  (('J'<<24) | ('F'<<16) | ('I'<<8) | 'F')

// Result will be in 'host' byte-order
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = JPEG_MAGIC;

// Result will be in 'network' byte-order (IE. Big-Endian/Human-Readable)
unsigned long  jpeg_magic = htonl(JPEG_MAGIC);

There IS an equivalent htons() for variables of type 'short' (2 bytes).

There is NO equivalent htonll() for variables of type 'long long' (8 bytes).

There are equivalent ntohs() and ntohl() functions for converting back to 'host' order.

These apparent functions are actually macros (defined in ) so there is no runtime overhead for using them.