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This seems to be a classic case of non-standard features on various platforms.

Quite simply, I want a universally (or at least widely) supported method for getting the modified time of a file as a unix timestamp in seconds.

Now I know of various ways to do this with stat but most are platform for specific; for example stat -c %Y $file works for some, but won't work on OS X (and presumably other FreeBSD systems) which uses stat -f %m $file instead.

Likewise, some platforms support date -r $file +%s, however OS X/FreeBSD again does not as the -r option seems to just be an alternate to using +%s for getting a unix timestamp, rather than the reference file option as on other platforms.

The other alternative I'm familiar with is to use find with the -printf option, but again this is not widely supported. The last method I know of is parsing ls which, aside from being an unpleasant thing to have to do, is not something I believe can (or at least should) be relied upon either.

So, is there a more compatible method for getting a file's modified time? Currently I'm just throwing different variations of stat into a script and running them until one exits with a status of zero, but this is far from ideal, even if I cache the successful command to run first in future.

This seems to be a classic case of non-standard features on various platforms.

Quite simply, I want a universally (or at least widely) supported method for getting the modified time of a file as a unix timestamp in seconds.

Now I know of various ways to do this with stat but most are platform for specific; for example stat -c %Y $file works for some, but won't work on OS X (and presumably other FreeBSD systems) which uses stat -f %m $file instead.

Likewise, some platforms support date -r $file +%s, however OS X/FreeBSD again does not as the -r option seems to just be an alternate to using +%s for getting a unix timestamp, rather than the reference file option as on other platforms.

The other alternative I'm familiar with is to use find with the -printf option, but again this is not widely supported. The last method I know of is parsing ls which, aside from being an unpleasant thing to have to do, is not something I believe can (or at least should) be relied upon either.

So, is there a more compatible method for getting a file's modified time? Currently I'm just throwing different variations of stat into a script and running them until one exits with a status of zero, but this is far from ideal.

This seems to be a classic case of non-standard features on various platforms.

Quite simply, I want a universally (or at least widely) supported method for getting the modified time of a file as a unix timestamp in seconds.

Now I know of various ways to do this with stat but most are platform specific; for example stat -c %Y $file works for some, but won't work on OS X (and presumably other FreeBSD systems) which uses stat -f %m $file instead.

Likewise, some platforms support date -r $file +%s, however OS X/FreeBSD again does not as the -r option seems to just be an alternate to using +%s for getting a unix timestamp, rather than the reference file option as on other platforms.

The other alternative I'm familiar with is to use find with the -printf option, but again this is not widely supported. The last method I know of is parsing ls which, aside from being an unpleasant thing to have to do, is not something I believe can (or at least should) be relied upon either.

So, is there a more compatible method for getting a file's modified time? Currently I'm just throwing different variations of stat into a script and running them until one exits with a status of zero, but this is far from ideal, even if I cache the successful command to run first in future.

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Best Way to Get File Modified Time in Seconds

This seems to be a classic case of non-standard features on various platforms.

Quite simply, I want a universally (or at least widely) supported method for getting the modified time of a file as a unix timestamp in seconds.

Now I know of various ways to do this with stat but most are platform for specific; for example stat -c %Y $file works for some, but won't work on OS X (and presumably other FreeBSD systems) which uses stat -f %m $file instead.

Likewise, some platforms support date -r $file +%s, however OS X/FreeBSD again does not as the -r option seems to just be an alternate to using +%s for getting a unix timestamp, rather than the reference file option as on other platforms.

The other alternative I'm familiar with is to use find with the -printf option, but again this is not widely supported. The last method I know of is parsing ls which, aside from being an unpleasant thing to have to do, is not something I believe can (or at least should) be relied upon either.

So, is there a more compatible method for getting a file's modified time? Currently I'm just throwing different variations of stat into a script and running them until one exits with a status of zero, but this is far from ideal.